Fallout: Chokes, Referees, and Kevin Lee, Tony Ferguson Talking Major Trash

UFC Fight Night 112 saw some major controversy in the main event. The fight between Michael Chiesa and Kevin Lee was anticipated to be a high stakes game between two fighters hoping to enter title contention with a win Sunday night. But instead of everyone speaking on how great the main event was, everyone is talking about Mario Yamasaki’s supposed “flub.”

Watch the fight the first time around, it appeared that Michael Chiesa was still conscious and willing to continue his grudge match again Kevin Lee. Yamasaki intervened and called the fight which seemed to many observers to be an early stoppage. Here’s the thing about being a ref: it’s an absolutely thankless job. No one appreciates what these refs have to go through with each and every fight they have to call. The thing about this fight was that it was apparent in multiple viewings that Michael Chiesa was on his way to blacking out completely.

The choke was locked in tight, there was thirty plus seconds left, Lee was cranking his choke and Chiesa’s arms went limp, eyes fading and rolling back into his head, a clear response from a blood choke rather than a wind choke. With Yamasaki on top of the action he had the best view out of anyone present. Rather than letting Chiesa go out like a “warrior” Yamasaki instead stopped the match. Sure, we want fighters to be given a chance at victory, at accomplishing the goals they’ve been obsessed with for weeks of training. Problem is that their ego can get in the way of their health at times and that’s what the refs are there for. As a result we have an angry fighter, angry fans, and people cursing the ref for his utter stupidity. Funny thing is, while the tough call may not be the most popular, Yamasaki had a job to do, did what he thought was right and shouldn’t be demonized for it.

On a side note, I never knew I wanted a Kevin Lee versus Tony Ferguson fight before last night. Ferguson congratulated Lee like a true class act, but the brash Detroit native took things a different way. In true McGregor form, Lee wasted no time in his additional time on television as he relegated the rest of the lightweight division as chumps and potentially set up a match between himself and Ferguson.

It was entertaining as hell and is just the kind of thing you want to see if you’re the UFC. Two personalities clashing making for a potentially exciting grudge match in the cage. It’ll sell and at the end of the day this sport is a business. Dollars and cents rule the day and Kevin Lee is setting himself up nicely to start making a nice profit.

What are your biggest takeaways from UFC Fight Night 112?


Jonathan Salmon is a writer, martial arts instructor, and geek culture enthusiast. Check out his Instagram, Twitter and Facebook to keep up with his antics.

The post Fallout: Chokes, Referees, and Kevin Lee, Tony Ferguson Talking Major Trash appeared first on Cagepotato.

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Predictions! UFC Lincoln ‘Prelims’ Preview – Pt. 2

Ultimate Fighting Championship (UFC) is bringing a bevy of “Prelims” fights to both UFC Fight Pass and FOX Sports 1 this weekend (Sat., Aug. 25, 2018) when UFC Fight Night 135: “Gaethje vs. Vick” storms Pinnacle Bank Arena, Lincoln, Nebraska. MMAmania.com’s Patrick Stumberg continues the UFC Fight Night 135 “Prelims” party with the second — and final — installment of a two-part undercard preview series below.

It’s time for less than five rounds of Lightweight action!

Human bonus-winning machine Justin Gaethje and surging contender James Vick take their feud from Twitter to the Octagon in Lincoln, Neb., this Saturday (Aug. 25, 2018), headlining UFC Fight Night 135 inside Pinnacle Bank Arena, which will air live on FOX Sports 1. UFC Fight Night 135’s main card will also feature Bryan Barberena vs. Jake Ellenberger, Deiveson Figueiredo vs. John Moraga, and Eryk Anders vs. Tim Williams, among others.

We’ve got four more UFC Fight Night 135 “Prelims” undercard matches to check out before that, though (check out the first batch here), so let’s continue, shall we?

170 lbs.: James Krause vs. Warlley Alves

Despite riding a two-fight win streak, James Krause (23-8) elected to try his hand on The Ultimate Fighter (TUF) 25, where he picked up another two wins before falling to Jesse Taylor in the semifinals. He has since notched victories over Tom Gallicchio and Alex White to move his UFC record to 6-3.

He stands three inches taller than Warlley Alves (13-2) and will have an inch of reach on him.

Alves followed up his dominant TUF: “Brazil” run with four consecutive Octagon victories, only to drop consecutive bouts to Bryan Barberena and Kamaru Usman. He has since gotten back on track with wins over Salim Touahri and Sultan Aliev, the latter of whom he finished via grotesque eye swelling.

Four of his six submission wins have come by guillotine.

Assuming he doesn’t have issues making the cut, I’d prefer to see Krause at 155 pounds. At Welterweight, he’s going to struggle against more physically powerful foes, a bill which Alves fits nicely. He’s got the heavier hands of the two and should be able to power through Krause’s long-range offense to do damage on the inside.

I’m not convinced Krause has the firepower to keep Alves off of him, and judging by that less than 20 percent takedown accuracy, he’s not shutting down Alves the way Usman did. Alves’ steady pressure stifles Krause’s kicks and allows him to beat up the head and legs for a clear decision.

Prediction: Alves via unanimous decision

135 lbs.: Cory Sandhagen vs. Iuri Alcantara

Two knockout victories in a combined 4:07 erased the memory of Cory Sandhagen’s (8-1) lone career loss and brought him to the Octagon this past January on an eight-day turnaround. The short notice proved no issue as he put away Austin Arnett with body shots in the second round.

He’s two inches taller than Iuri Alcantara (36-9), but will give up an inch of reach.

Alcantara’s comeback kneebar of Luke Sanders gave way to upset losses to Brian Kelleher and Alejandro Perez, the former of whom handed “Marajo” his first submission loss since 2009. He went on to prove he was still dangerous by thrashing Joe Soto in 66 seconds to secure his fourth post-fight bonus in his previous six fights.

He has knocked out and submitted 14 opponents apiece.

As great as the Soto knockout was, it feels like Alcantara’s flashes of brilliance are getting fewer and farther between. “Marajo” took a career-altering beating from Sanders before pulling off a Hail Mary submission and sleepwalked through his fight with Perez. He’s also closing in on 40 years old, meaning that freak athleticism may not last much longer.

Sandhagen, meanwhile, is a decade younger and a much smoother striker. His body attack should work well against the explosive Brazilian and Alcantara’s never been a consistent takedown artist. Barring one of the bursts of violence “Marajo” is known for, Sandhagen avoids the big left hand and out-boxes him for 15 minutes.

Prediction: Sandhagen via unanimous decision

185 lbs.: Andrew Sanchez vs. Markus Perez

Andrew Sanchez (9-4) looked poised to make waves in the division after a strong TUF run, dominating Khalil Rountree and defeating Trevor Smith in his first two Octagon appearances. His cardio issues have since reared their heads, allowing underdogs Anthony Smith and Ryan Janes to knock him out in brutal fashion.

He has knocked out five opponents and submitted another two.

Markus Perez (10-1) made the most of his first LFA appearance by choking out future “Contender Series” standout Ian Heinisch to win the promotion’s Middleweight title. He fell to Eryk Anders in his short-notice Octagon debut, but picked up his first UFC victory in May with a submission of James Bochnovic.

“Maluko” steps in for Antonio Braga Neto on three weeks notice.

Sanchez could really be something special if he could learn to pace himself. Solid wrestling and Brazilian jiu-jitsu with serviceable striking is a quality skillset, even it’ll never carry him past the monsters waiting at the top of the division.

I’m going to go out on a limb and say he wins this, even if that seems hypocritical given how I talked about Jon Tuck yesterday. He just seems like he can outclass Perez in the latter’s area of expertise, and I’d imagine that thrashing from Ryan Janes has taught him not to blow his wad early. This is the last shot I’ll give him, but I say Sanchez comes up big with his back against the wall and mixes boxing and takedowns for the win.

Prediction: Sanchez via unanimous decision

170 lbs.: Mickey Gall vs. George Sullivan

Mickey Gall (4-1) rose above his Octagon origins as a C.M. Punk opponent to become a genuine contender with his 2016 submission of Sage Northcutt. He had some good moments, but couldn’t do the same to Randy Brown at UFC 217, resulting his first-ever professional defeat.

All four of his professional mixed martial arts (MMA) wins have come by rear-naked choke.

George Sullivan (17-6) started his UFC career strong with wins over Mike Rhodes and Igor Araujo, closing as the underdog in both fights. He’s just 1-3 since, suffering stoppage losses to Tim Means, Alexander Yakovlev and Niko Price, and faced a two-year layoff because of USADA issues.

“The Silencer” has knocked out 11 professional opponents.

This is a fairly obvious get-well fight for Gall, albeit one with the slightest tinge of danger. Sullivan is a threat on the feet and showed some nasty ground-and-pound against Araujo. That said, he looked hopeless on the ground against Niko Price, who struggles in most aspects of the game that aren’t punching people extremely hard, and has been taken down at least twice in every UFC appearance.

Heck, Dom Waters got him down five times.

Gall’s going to get him to the mat as soon as he wants to, and from there it’s just a matter of time until he takes the back and puts on the squeeze.

Prediction: Gall via first-round submission

Justin Gaethje means I’m tuning in, no questions asked. See you Saturday, Maniacs.

Remember that MMAmania.com will deliver LIVE round-by-round, blow-by-blow coverage of the entire UFC Fight Night 135 fight card this weekend, starting with the Fight Pass “Prelims” undercard bout at 6:30 p.m. ET, followed by the FOX Sports 1 “Prelims” undercard bouts at 8 p.m. ET, before the main card start time at 10 p.m. ET (also on FOX Sports 1).

- Current UFC “Prelims” Prediction Record for 2018: 113-56

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Hector Lombard Relocates to Sweden’s Allstars Training Center Ahead of UFC Sao Paulo

Hector Lombard is looking to change things up in order to halt a six-fight winless streak.
Recent News on Sherdog.com

Is The UFC Worth Seven Billion Bucks?

It was just a few short years ago that the Fertitta brothers sold the UFC for over four billion dollars, and now, according to UFC honcho Dana White, the organization’s value tops seven billion.

Granted, this info is coming from a somewhat nonpartisan person, and we’d never know the UFC’s true valuation until a roomful of bespectacled bean counters goes through all the paperwork themselves, but if that number is accurate… wow.

Despite a seeming lack of pay-per-view magic, the UFC has been making some moves.

Here’s MMAJunkie:

According to White and corroborating investor reports, 2017 was the most financially lucrative year in company history. Add in the UFC’s new stateside television deal with ESPN worth $ 1.5 billion over five years, and White said the value of the UFC brand now sits at a whopping $ 7 billion.

“When you think about it we haven’t even scratched the surface yet of how big this thing can be,” White said in a recent interview with Tony Robbins. “We just did a TV deal with ESPN for $ 1.5 billion for five years. Now the company is worth $ 7 billion.”

Whether White’s claim is accurate or not is unknown, but he made it clear he still sees the UFC on an upward trajectory. Ratings for the majority of the UFC’s televised events in the United States arguably tell a slightly different story, but the company is still pulling strong gate and attendance numbers, plus there are a lengthy list of international deals that drive significant revenue.

The post Is The UFC Worth Seven Billion Bucks? appeared first on Caged Insider.

Caged Insider

Hector Lombard Relocates to Sweden’s Allstars Training Center Ahead of UFC Sao Paulo

Hector Lombard is looking to change things up in order to halt a six-fight winless streak.
Recent News on Sherdog.com

Unconscious Fighter ‘Saw Death’ After Ref Let Choke Go On For 90 Secs

Melquizael Costa explains what it was like after a referee almost let him get choked to death during a Demolidor Fight event in Brazil.

Back in the ‘60s, Yale University psychologist Stanley Milgram put together a controversial experiment to see how far the average person can be pushed into behaving unethically if prompted by someone in a position of authority. Subjects were placed in a room and prompted by scientists to press a button delivering electrical shocks to an unseen victim. The number of people who followed those prompts even as the (fake) victim screamed was disturbingly high.

In MMA, we sometimes see a different sort of Milgram experiment. A fighter has defeated their opponent, yet the referee isn’t stepping in. Will the fighter stop attacking his defenseless victim or wait until the referee stops the fight?

The latest terrible example of this came in the main event of Brazil’s Demolidor Fight main event this past weekend. Rafael Barbosa put Melquizael Costa to sleep in a choke, only to have the ref not realize the fight was over. Watch:

As if that wasn’t disturbing enough, now MMA Fighting’s Guilherme Cruz has some words from Costa.

“He locked the anaconda choke, and when I turned to the wrong side, I went out,” Costa told MMA Fighting. “The first thing I remember is opening my eyes and seeing my coaches and a doctor over me, calling my name, and I couldn’t breathe. It was agonizing. I only came back to normal when I got to the hospital and they gave me some serum.”

“I saw in the video that I went out and my eyes were open,” Costa said. “You might think I’m awake, but I was already out. I moved a couple of times, but I was having seizures. My corner and his corner yelled that I was out, but the referee said he would only stop the fight if I was out. And I was! Every referee touches the fighter to see if they are out, but he never touched me. My opponent stopped the fight. Otherwise, I would be dead.”

“My wife is still in shock,” Costa said. “My wife and friends were watching the fight online and they cut the stream when that happened, and everyone was in shock because they didn’t know what happened. I saw death so close. My opponent let me go, otherwise I would be dead if I had to wait for the referee. It was horrible. It was agonizing for me when I came back because I couldn’t breathe.”

The referee involved has already announced his decision to retire, which is probably not a terrible idea given how badly things almost turned out in this situation.

MMAmania.com – All Posts

Yoel Romero Unable to Face Paulo Costa at UFC 230 Due to Broken Orbital

It appears that top middleweight contender Yoel Romero won’t be able to compete at UFC 230 as originally planned.
Recent News on Sherdog.com

Kamaru Usman Compares Darren Till’s Weight Struggles With Anthony Johnson

Kamaru Usman has been officially named by the Ultimate Fighting Championship as a back-up for the UFC 228’s welterweight title fight between the current champion Tyron Woodley and Liverpool, England’s Darren Till. Usman was a recent guest on The MMA Hour and was asked about his status as a replacement for both fighters before stating his belief that Till would struggle again to make weight.
Recent News on Sherdog.com

Is The UFC Worth Seven Billion Bucks?

It was just a few short years ago that the Fertitta brothers sold the UFC for over four billion dollars, and now, according to UFC honcho Dana White, the organization’s value tops seven billion.

Granted, this info is coming from a somewhat nonpartisan person, and we’d never know the UFC’s true valuation until a roomful of bespectacled bean counters goes through all the paperwork themselves, but if that number is accurate… wow.

Despite a seeming lack of pay-per-view magic, the UFC has been making some moves.

Here’s MMAJunkie:

According to White and corroborating investor reports, 2017 was the most financially lucrative year in company history. Add in the UFC’s new stateside television deal with ESPN worth $ 1.5 billion over five years, and White said the value of the UFC brand now sits at a whopping $ 7 billion.

“When you think about it we haven’t even scratched the surface yet of how big this thing can be,” White said in a recent interview with Tony Robbins. “We just did a TV deal with ESPN for $ 1.5 billion for five years. Now the company is worth $ 7 billion.”

Whether White’s claim is accurate or not is unknown, but he made it clear he still sees the UFC on an upward trajectory. Ratings for the majority of the UFC’s televised events in the United States arguably tell a slightly different story, but the company is still pulling strong gate and attendance numbers, plus there are a lengthy list of international deals that drive significant revenue.

The post Is The UFC Worth Seven Billion Bucks? appeared first on Caged Insider.

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Midnight Mania! Incompetent referee allows unconscious fighter to stay in chokehold for 90 seconds

Bringing you the weird and wild from the world of MMA each and every weeknight

Welcome to Midnight Mania!

I cover this sport nearly every day, and I see plenty that make me wince or cringe — a particularly gruesome knockout, limbs snapping, late stoppages — but this may be the hardest thing to watch I’ve seen yet.

The event was Demolidor Fight MMA 13, and the fight was the main event, Melziquiel Conceição (Melk) vs Rafael Barbosa. Melk was the man unconscious as Barbosa held the choke while the referee looked placidly on as a man nearly died in front of his eyes. The commission proceeded to blame the promotion, and the promotion blame the commission, for hiring the referee.

The fighter, who was taken to the hospital, was reportedly okay afterwards, though he said he couldn’t seem to breathe correctly.

Big John also weighed in, and had a similar reaction.

Every referee makes gaffes- John McCarthy himself was infamously kicked by Roy Nelson after a late stoppage of his opponent- but this one was utterly beyond the pale.

Hopefully that referee will never ever oversee two men in combat ever again. He deserves to be decked for that gross negligence, like this referee was.


Insomnia

Ali Abelaziz is one of the most successful MMA managers today. He’s also full of it.

Tony Ferguson rejects the “weird” label

Quinton “Rampage” Jackson still got jokes.

This was the very obvious response to Dana White, who has been saying a lot of stuff lately.

Dana White is just making things up, of course, but this is still egregious.

Mike Perry living his best life

The fight odds for Justin Gaethje vs. James Vick have Gaethje as the underdog, and though I’m rooting for Gaethje, I have to agree. This is another tough matchup for him.

MMA fighter TJ Laramie says this video is of him catching his girlfriend cheating on him.

Slick bit of grappling

I’ve never seen this effortless takedown before.

There is some genuinely awful self-defense advice out there.

Actor Chris Pratt, of Guardians of the Galaxy, Avengers 3, Magnificent Seven and of course, Parks and Rec fame, has MMA nightmares and spent Sunday working them out on the pads.

Amazing back kick by Alexey Efremov, took the wind right out of him.

Daniel Cormier has a clean USADA testing schedule, but we all remember towelgate, and Joe Rogan says extreme weight cutting is more effective cheating than steroids.

A post shared by ASAIG (@_asaig_) on

How I think I look while training:

How I actually look:

I like this sketch art of Dustin Poirier vs. Nate Diaz. With Yoel Romero vs. Paulo Costa sadly off UFC 230, this fight takes on more importance to the big NYC card.

Sometimes the best insults don’t use words. Luke Rockhold vs. Chris Weidman 2 means UFC 230 is still middleweight mayhem in the making.

In case you missed this insane Cowboy Cerrone story: the man almost died in an underwater cave. A lot of people have died on cave dives, so he’s not exaggerating the danger.

Look at this body hook.

McGregor has never been particularly adept at defending his big noggin using his gloves (it’s harder to do well with small gloves anyway), so fighting hands low has always made the most sense for him.

Fuck hands up.

A post shared by Conor McGregor Official (@thenotoriousmma) on


Random Land

Goats don’t care. Goats live free and die hard.

This guy had some life. I love learning about people that history has largely forgotten.

While I’m on my history kick: they thought man-made climate change might turn out to be a problem in 1912.

Road Runner stuff right here.

Stay woke, Maniacs! Follow me on Twitter and Facebook @Vorpality. Support my Kickstarter

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