Tag Archive for Wins

UFC 191 results: John Lineker wins wild slugfest against Francisco Rivera

John Lineker went up to the bantamweight division Saturday night. And he remembered to bring the power he showed in the flyweight division with him.

Lineker (26-7) got into a wild brawl with Francisco Rivera (11-5 1 NC) at UFC 191 at the MGM Grand Garden Arena in Las Vegas, then sealed the deal with a guillotine choke. The time of the whirlwind fight was 2:08.

More Coverage: UFC 191 Results | UFC news

The Brazilian standout landed several big blows at the outset as the fighters stood and traded, which knocked Rivera to the mat, then continued to land punches to the downed Rivera.

Rivera, however, was determined to make a comeback or go out on his shield. He got back to his feet and managed to land a couple impressive shots of his own. The two winged punches at one another until Rivera pulled guard and got the winning choke.

“He wasn’t intimidated because I was coming up from a lower division,” Lineker said. “I’m glad he did that.”

Lineker has won three straight and seven of his past eight. However, he consistently missed weight in the 125-pound division, necessitating his jump to 135.

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CSAC will no longer recognize wins earned in unsanctioned events

LOS ANGELES — The California State Athletic Commission (CSAC) has fired its first salvo against unsanctioned events in its state.

CSAC executive officer Andy Foster said Tuesday during the commission’s meeting that he would ignore victories obtained in unsanctioned events when he’s vetting the matchmaking of CSAC-regulated promotions. If all of a fighters’ wins have come in unsanctioned shows, CSAC will treat that fighter like he or she is making his or her pro debut and that fighter will not be able to compete against a more experienced opponent.

In theory, this will make it more difficult for a fighter who competes at unsanctioned events to make a direct jump to a major organization like the UFC or Bellator.

“If you’ve done all your fights against fake record people, you’re starting at nothing,” Foster said.

The commission will also be looking into other alternatives to curb the practice of fighters competing at unsanctioned events with the hopes of building their résumé against seemingly untrained opponents with records like 1-16 and 0-22.

CSAC will explore legal options into disciplinary action against licensees who compete at unsanctioned events and attempt to work with the Association of Boxing Commissions to reach out to the Native American reservations that host these shows. The commission will also consider upping the medical testing requirements of fighters who compete in unsanctioned events and then attempt to fight in a CSAC show.

The issue of unsanctioned events was brought to CSAC’s attention by the viral video of a particularly brutal knockout at Xplode Fight Series in January. Ilima MacFarlane, a trained and talented fighter out of San Diego Combat Academy, viciously knocked out Katie Castro in just 10 seconds. Castro, who looked ill prepared and not trained for a fight, was dubbed a “soccer mom” (even though she is not) by blogs. Castro had an 0-2 record coming into the fight with both losses coming via TKO in fewer than 30 seconds.

Fighters, managers and coaches told MMA Fighting in a three-part investigative piece that Xplode Fight Series did not require any medical exams or blood work from its competitors and deliberately sets up egregious mismatches.

XFS owner Gregg Sharp maintains that his standards are similar to sanctioned, regional shows across the country and that he does require things like blood work and medicals. Sharp told MMA Fighting on Sunday that he is in the process of bringing aboard a third-party sanctioning body for his next event Sept. 19.

Promotions like Xplode Fight Series and Gladiator Challenge skirt state athletic commission regulation by running events on Native American reservations. CSAC cannot regulate a show on a reservation unless explicitly invited by the tribe. Sharp said he has considered using CSAC to regulate his events, but commission sanctioning is too expensive.

The Association of Boxing Commissions, which oversees the state athletic commissions, recommends a 120-day suspension for fighters who compete on unsanctioned shows, but actual regulations are dependent on the legislation of the respective state.

MMA Fighting – All Posts

CSAC will no longer recognize wins earned in unsanctioned events

LOS ANGELES — The California State Athletic Commission (CSAC) has fired its first salvo against unsanctioned events in its state.

CSAC executive officer Andy Foster said Tuesday during the commission’s meeting that he would ignore victories obtained in unsanctioned events when he’s vetting the matchmaking of CSAC-regulated promotions. If all of a fighters’ wins have come in unsanctioned shows, CSAC will treat that fighter like he or she is making his or her pro debut and that fighter will not be able to compete against a more experienced opponent.

In theory, this will make it more difficult for a fighter who competes at unsanctioned events to make a direct jump to a major organization like the UFC or Bellator.

“If you’ve done all your fights against fake record people, you’re starting at nothing,” Foster said.

The commission will also be looking into other alternatives to curb the practice of fighters competing at unsanctioned events with the hopes of building their résumé against seemingly untrained opponents with records like 1-16 and 0-22.

CSAC will explore legal options into disciplinary action against licensees who compete at unsanctioned events and attempt to work with the Association of Boxing Commissions to reach out to the Native American reservations that host these shows. The commission will also consider upping the medical testing requirements of fighters who compete in unsanctioned events and then attempt to fight in a CSAC show.

The issue of unsanctioned events was brought to CSAC’s attention by the viral video of a particularly brutal knockout at Xplode Fight Series in January. Ilima MacFarlane, a trained and talented fighter out of San Diego Combat Academy, viciously knocked out Katie Castro in just 10 seconds. Castro, who looked ill prepared and not trained for a fight, was dubbed a “soccer mom” (even though she is not) by blogs. Castro had an 0-2 record coming into the fight with both losses coming via TKO in fewer than 30 seconds.

Fighters, managers and coaches told MMA Fighting in a three-part investigative piece that Xplode Fight Series did not require any medical exams or blood work from its competitors and deliberately sets up egregious mismatches.

XFS owner Gregg Sharp maintains that his standards are similar to sanctioned, regional shows across the country and that he does require things like blood work and medicals. Sharp told MMA Fighting on Sunday that he is in the process of bringing aboard a third-party sanctioning body for his next event Sept. 19.

Promotions like Xplode Fight Series and Gladiator Challenge skirt state athletic commission regulation by running events on Native American reservations. CSAC cannot regulate a show on a reservation unless explicitly invited by the tribe. Sharp said he has considered using CSAC to regulate his events, but commission sanctioning is too expensive.

The Association of Boxing Commissions, which oversees the state athletic commissions, recommends a 120-day suspension for fighters who compete on unsanctioned shows, but actual regulations are dependent on the legislation of the respective state.

MMA Fighting – All Posts

CSAC will no longer recognize wins earned in unsanctioned events

LOS ANGELES — The California State Athletic Commission (CSAC) has fired its first salvo against unsanctioned events in its state.

CSAC executive officer Andy Foster said Tuesday during the commission’s meeting that he would ignore victories obtained in unsanctioned events when he’s vetting the matchmaking of CSAC-regulated promotions. If all of a fighters’ wins have come in unsanctioned shows, CSAC will treat that fighter like he or she is making his or her pro debut and that fighter will not be able to compete against a more experienced opponent.

In theory, this will make it more difficult for a fighter who competes at unsanctioned events to make a direct jump to a major organization like the UFC or Bellator.

“If you’ve done all your fights against fake record people, you’re starting at nothing,” Foster said.

The commission will also be looking into other alternatives to curb the practice of fighters competing at unsanctioned events with the hopes of building their résumé against seemingly untrained opponents with records like 1-16 and 0-22.

CSAC will explore legal options into disciplinary action against licensees who compete at unsanctioned events and attempt to work with the Association of Boxing Commissions to reach out to the Native American reservations that host these shows. The commission will also consider upping the medical testing requirements of fighters who compete in unsanctioned events and then attempt to fight in a CSAC show.

The issue of unsanctioned events was brought to CSAC’s attention by the viral video of a particularly brutal knockout at Xplode Fight Series in January. Ilima MacFarlane, a trained and talented fighter out of San Diego Combat Academy, viciously knocked out Katie Castro in just 10 seconds. Castro, who looked ill prepared and not trained for a fight, was dubbed a “soccer mom” (even though she is not) by blogs. Castro had an 0-2 record coming into the fight with both losses coming via TKO in fewer than 30 seconds.

Fighters, managers and coaches told MMA Fighting in a three-part investigative piece that Xplode Fight Series did not require any medical exams or blood work from its competitors and deliberately sets up egregious mismatches.

XFS owner Gregg Sharp maintains that his standards are similar to sanctioned, regional shows across the country and that he does require things like blood work and medicals. Sharp told MMA Fighting on Sunday that he is in the process of bringing aboard a third-party sanctioning body for his next event Sept. 19.

Promotions like Xplode Fight Series and Gladiator Challenge skirt state athletic commission regulation by running events on Native American reservations. CSAC cannot regulate a show on a reservation unless explicitly invited by the tribe. Sharp said he has considered using CSAC to regulate his events, but commission sanctioning is too expensive.

The Association of Boxing Commissions, which oversees the state athletic commissions, recommends a 120-day suspension for fighters who compete on unsanctioned shows, but actual regulations are dependent on the legislation of the respective state.

MMA Fighting – All Posts

CSAC will no longer recognize wins earned in unsanctioned events

LOS ANGELES — The California State Athletic Commission (CSAC) has fired its first salvo against unsanctioned events in its state.

CSAC executive officer Andy Foster said Tuesday during the commission’s meeting that he would ignore victories obtained in unsanctioned events when he’s vetting the matchmaking of CSAC-regulated promotions. If all of a fighters’ wins have come in unsanctioned shows, CSAC will treat that fighter like he or she is making his or her pro debut and that fighter will not be able to compete against a more experienced opponent.

In theory, this will make it more difficult for a fighter who competes at unsanctioned events to make a direct jump to a major organization like the UFC or Bellator.

“If you’ve done all your fights against fake record people, you’re starting at nothing,” Foster said.

The commission will also be looking into other alternatives to curb the practice of fighters competing at unsanctioned events with the hopes of building their résumé against seemingly untrained opponents with records like 1-16 and 0-22.

CSAC will explore legal options into disciplinary action against licensees who compete at unsanctioned events and attempt to work with the Association of Boxing Commissions to reach out to the Native American reservations that host these shows. The commission will also consider upping the medical testing requirements of fighters who compete in unsanctioned events and then attempt to fight in a CSAC show.

The issue of unsanctioned events was brought to CSAC’s attention by the viral video of a particularly brutal knockout at Xplode Fight Series in January. Ilima MacFarlane, a trained and talented fighter out of San Diego Combat Academy, viciously knocked out Katie Castro in just 10 seconds. Castro, who looked ill prepared and not trained for a fight, was dubbed a “soccer mom” (even though she is not) by blogs. Castro had an 0-2 record coming into the fight with both losses coming via TKO in fewer than 30 seconds.

Fighters, managers and coaches told MMA Fighting in a three-part investigative piece that Xplode Fight Series did not require any medical exams or blood work from its competitors and deliberately sets up egregious mismatches.

XFS owner Gregg Sharp maintains that his standards are similar to sanctioned, regional shows across the country and that he does require things like blood work and medicals. Sharp told MMA Fighting on Sunday that he is in the process of bringing aboard a third-party sanctioning body for his next event Sept. 19.

Promotions like Xplode Fight Series and Gladiator Challenge skirt state athletic commission regulation by running events on Native American reservations. CSAC cannot regulate a show on a reservation unless explicitly invited by the tribe. Sharp said he has considered using CSAC to regulate his events, but commission sanctioning is too expensive.

The Association of Boxing Commissions, which oversees the state athletic commissions, recommends a 120-day suspension for fighters who compete on unsanctioned shows, but actual regulations are dependent on the legislation of the respective state.

MMA Fighting – All Posts

CSAC will no longer recognize wins earned in unsanctioned events

LOS ANGELES — The California State Athletic Commission (CSAC) has fired its first salvo against unsanctioned events in its state.

CSAC executive officer Andy Foster said Tuesday during the commission’s meeting that he would ignore victories obtained in unsanctioned events when he’s vetting the matchmaking of CSAC-regulated promotions. If all of a fighters’ wins have come in unsanctioned shows, CSAC will treat that fighter like he or she is making his or her pro debut and that fighter will not be able to compete against a more experienced opponent.

In theory, this will make it more difficult for a fighter who competes at unsanctioned events to make a direct jump to a major organization like the UFC or Bellator.

“If you’ve done all your fights against fake record people, you’re starting at nothing,” Foster said.

The commission will also be looking into other alternatives to curb the practice of fighters competing at unsanctioned events with the hopes of building their résumé against seemingly untrained opponents with records like 1-16 and 0-22.

CSAC will explore legal options into disciplinary action against licensees who compete at unsanctioned events and attempt to work with the Association of Boxing Commissions to reach out to the Native American reservations that host these shows. The commission will also consider upping the medical testing requirements of fighters who compete in unsanctioned events and then attempt to fight in a CSAC show.

The issue of unsanctioned events was brought to CSAC’s attention by the viral video of a particularly brutal knockout at Xplode Fight Series in January. Ilima MacFarlane, a trained and talented fighter out of San Diego Combat Academy, viciously knocked out Katie Castro in just 10 seconds. Castro, who looked ill prepared and not trained for a fight, was dubbed a “soccer mom” (even though she is not) by blogs. Castro had an 0-2 record coming into the fight with both losses coming via TKO in fewer than 30 seconds.

Fighters, managers and coaches told MMA Fighting in a three-part investigative piece that Xplode Fight Series did not require any medical exams or blood work from its competitors and deliberately sets up egregious mismatches.

XFS owner Gregg Sharp maintains that his standards are similar to sanctioned, regional shows across the country and that he does require things like blood work and medicals. Sharp told MMA Fighting on Sunday that he is in the process of bringing aboard a third-party sanctioning body for his next event Sept. 19.

Promotions like Xplode Fight Series and Gladiator Challenge skirt state athletic commission regulation by running events on Native American reservations. CSAC cannot regulate a show on a reservation unless explicitly invited by the tribe. Sharp said he has considered using CSAC to regulate his events, but commission sanctioning is too expensive.

The Association of Boxing Commissions, which oversees the state athletic commissions, recommends a 120-day suspension for fighters who compete on unsanctioned shows, but actual regulations are dependent on the legislation of the respective state.

MMA Fighting – All Posts

CSAC will no longer recognize wins earned in unsanctioned events

LOS ANGELES — The California State Athletic Commission (CSAC) has fired its first salvo against unsanctioned events in its state.

CSAC executive officer Andy Foster said Tuesday during the commission’s meeting that he would ignore victories obtained in unsanctioned events when he’s vetting the matchmaking of CSAC-regulated promotions. If all of a fighters’ wins have come in unsanctioned shows, CSAC will treat that fighter like he or she is making his or her pro debut and that fighter will not be able to compete against a more experienced opponent.

In theory, this will make it more difficult for a fighter who competes at unsanctioned events to make a direct jump to a major organization like the UFC or Bellator.

“If you’ve done all your fights against fake record people, you’re starting at nothing,” Foster said.

The commission will also be looking into other alternatives to curb the practice of fighters competing at unsanctioned events with the hopes of building their résumé against seemingly untrained opponents with records like 1-16 and 0-22.

CSAC will explore legal options into disciplinary action against licensees who compete at unsanctioned events and attempt to work with the Association of Boxing Commissions to reach out to the Native American reservations that host these shows. The commission will also consider upping the medical testing requirements of fighters who compete in unsanctioned events and then attempt to fight in a CSAC show.

The issue of unsanctioned events was brought to CSAC’s attention by the viral video of a particularly brutal knockout at Xplode Fight Series in January. Ilima MacFarlane, a trained and talented fighter out of San Diego Combat Academy, viciously knocked out Katie Castro in just 10 seconds. Castro, who looked ill prepared and not trained for a fight, was dubbed a “soccer mom” (even though she is not) by blogs. Castro had an 0-2 record coming into the fight with both losses coming via TKO in fewer than 30 seconds.

Fighters, managers and coaches told MMA Fighting in a three-part investigative piece that Xplode Fight Series did not require any medical exams or blood work from its competitors and deliberately sets up egregious mismatches.

XFS owner Gregg Sharp maintains that his standards are similar to sanctioned, regional shows across the country and that he does require things like blood work and medicals. Sharp told MMA Fighting on Sunday that he is in the process of bringing aboard a third-party sanctioning body for his next event Sept. 19.

Promotions like Xplode Fight Series and Gladiator Challenge skirt state athletic commission regulation by running events on Native American reservations. CSAC cannot regulate a show on a reservation unless explicitly invited by the tribe. Sharp said he has considered using CSAC to regulate his events, but commission sanctioning is too expensive.

The Association of Boxing Commissions, which oversees the state athletic commissions, recommends a 120-day suspension for fighters who compete on unsanctioned shows, but actual regulations are dependent on the legislation of the respective state.

MMA Fighting – All Posts

CSAC will no longer recognize wins earned in unsanctioned events

LOS ANGELES — The California State Athletic Commission (CSAC) has fired its first salvo against unsanctioned events in its state.

CSAC executive officer Andy Foster said Tuesday during the commission’s meeting that he would ignore victories obtained in unsanctioned events when he’s vetting the matchmaking of CSAC-regulated promotions. If all of a fighters’ wins have come in unsanctioned shows, CSAC will treat that fighter like he or she is making his or her pro debut and that fighter will not be able to compete against a more experienced opponent.

In theory, this will make it more difficult for a fighter who competes at unsanctioned events to make a direct jump to a major organization like the UFC or Bellator.

“If you’ve done all your fights against fake record people, you’re starting at nothing,” Foster said.

The commission will also be looking into other alternatives to curb the practice of fighters competing at unsanctioned events with the hopes of building their résumé against seemingly untrained opponents with records like 1-16 and 0-22.

CSAC will explore legal options into disciplinary action against licensees who compete at unsanctioned events and attempt to work with the Association of Boxing Commissions to reach out to the Native American reservations that host these shows. The commission will also consider upping the medical testing requirements of fighters who compete in unsanctioned events and then attempt to fight in a CSAC show.

The issue of unsanctioned events was brought to CSAC’s attention by the viral video of a particularly brutal knockout at Xplode Fight Series in January. Ilima MacFarlane, a trained and talented fighter out of San Diego Combat Academy, viciously knocked out Katie Castro in just 10 seconds. Castro, who looked ill prepared and not trained for a fight, was dubbed a “soccer mom” (even though she is not) by blogs. Castro had an 0-2 record coming into the fight with both losses coming via TKO in fewer than 30 seconds.

Fighters, managers and coaches told MMA Fighting in a three-part investigative piece that Xplode Fight Series did not require any medical exams or blood work from its competitors and deliberately sets up egregious mismatches.

XFS owner Gregg Sharp maintains that his standards are similar to sanctioned, regional shows across the country and that he does require things like blood work and medicals. Sharp told MMA Fighting on Sunday that he is in the process of bringing aboard a third-party sanctioning body for his next event Sept. 19.

Promotions like Xplode Fight Series and Gladiator Challenge skirt state athletic commission regulation by running events on Native American reservations. CSAC cannot regulate a show on a reservation unless explicitly invited by the tribe. Sharp said he has considered using CSAC to regulate his events, but commission sanctioning is too expensive.

The Association of Boxing Commissions, which oversees the state athletic commissions, recommends a 120-day suspension for fighters who compete on unsanctioned shows, but actual regulations are dependent on the legislation of the respective state.

MMA Fighting – All Posts

MMA fighter in Brazil wins strawweight title … while 12 weeks pregnant

File this under: “You Don’t See This Everyday” and close it with a #ThankYourLuckyStars hashtag.

Female mixed martial arts (MMA) fighters have a much different set of potential problems — many more then their male counterparts — and pregnancy is chief among them.

Brazilian Strawweight contender, Kinberly Novaes, fought and defeated Renata Baldan on May 17, 2015, to win the Noxii 115-pound title. Unbeknownst to her, however, she was three months pregnant at the time.

In fact, she didn’t discover the baby growing in her belly until she was encountered trouble cutting weight for her bout agaisnt Jocelyn Jones Lybarger, which was set to go down on Aug. 21, 2015 under the RFA banner.

Novaes immediately visited her doctor, worried that something could have happened to her unborn child when she realized that she competed while pregnant, according to MMAFighting.com.

“We did a morphology ultrasound last week and the doctor said I’m 24 weeks pregnant, almost six months, and my baby is healthy and strong. I was worried because I trained hard, fought, cut weight. I suffered a lot to make weight for my last fight, couldn’t dehydrate properly, and I was already training to fight again next week, but the doctor said everything is fine.”

She continued:

“I’m a little stubborn, I don’t like to go to the doctor. I’ve been feeling sick for a while, colic, headaches and cramps. I was feeling tired recently, couldn’t even run, and it was really tough for me to cut weight. I was cutting weight for my RFA debut, but couldn’t lose weight. I did a stricter diet four weeks before the fight, and I actually gained 2.2 pounds in six days. I was desperate. I realized my belly was hard, so I thought I had some intestine issue. I took laxative and other things, but a guy that does massages for me told me to go to the doctor. I finally decided to go to the hospital, and the doctor immediately asked me if I was pregnant. I insisted I was not, that I had an intestine issue, but he asked for a blood test. One hour later, he told us I was pregnant. I cried a lot, ran out of the hospital, but I realized that was good news. I thought I was sick, but I had a baby instead.”

Upon discovering the news himself, Noxii promoter Bruno Barros took the blame, admitting that asking for pregnancy tests prior to the fight never crossed his mind.

“I didn’t ask for the exam. That’s the truth. I didn’t even think about the possibility of a woman fighting while pregnant, going through a camp and dehydrating and everything. That was my first event. I asked for HIV and hepatitis tests, but some fighters didn’t send me the results. I didn’t pull them out of the fights because they all wanted to fight. Some fighters claimed they had no money to pay for the tests, others said they didn’t have time to do it, but that’s my fault that I let them fight anyway. But thank God everything is fine with the baby.”

Thankfully, all is going well with Novaes’ pregnancy — she and her child dodged a major bullet.

But, the unforeseen incident is a true eye opener for all MMA promoters to ensure all proper testing is done prior to getting bout agreements signed.

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UFC on FOX 16 results: Edson Barboza wins wild fight with Paul Felder

CHICAGO — Given both fighters’ track records, the UFC on FOX 16 lightweight battle between Edson Barboza and Paul Felder promised excitement.

And excitement was indeed delivered.

The two engaged in a wild dance of spinning strikes, with both fighters seemingly determined to deliver a wild knockout.

More Coverage: UFC on FOX 16 Results | UFC news

In the end, though, Barboza’s a bit more experienced at this level, and showed a bit more poise when it counted most. He earned an across-the-board, 29-28 victory in a fight which wowed the United Center crowd.

“It was a great victory,” said Barboza (16-3), who won for the third time in his past four fights. “He was a very, very tough guy.”

The two started throwing spinning strikes from the outset, which led to an odd exchange in the middle of the opening round. Barboza landed a spinning back fist in which his forearm connected with Felder’s head, Felder, acknowledged it, and they touched gloves. Barboza then landed a nasty spinning back kick to to the groin, which brought the fight to a halt for awhile.

The bout continued, as the two spent two fast-paced rounds trading brutal body kicks and came back for more. Both fighters continued to try to finish the bout with a knockout of the year, and both just missed on several occasions.

Barboza dictated the pace in the final round as Felder (10-1) who proved he can hang at an elite level, couldn’t quite land like he did over the first two rounss.

“I worked hard for this fight,” said Barboza. “He’s very very good, but I train with some of the best in the world.”

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