Tag Archive for Totally

Conor McGregor Seems Totally Cool With What Happened Last Night

At UFC 229, former champ Conor McGregor took a beating at the hands of reigning champ Khabib Nurmagomedov. Then, because of all the bad blood between them, Khabib spat on Conor, climbed over the cage, and leaped into the audience to scrap with McGregor’s teammate, Dillon Danis.

To make matters worse, Khabib’s teammates scampered over the side of the cage and attacked McGregor. It was total bedlam, and it ended with Las Vegas police escorting McGregor backstage.

A dismayed UFC boss Dana White made it clear that some of Khabib’s teammates were subsequently arrested. And for sure the Nevada State Athletic Commission was withholding Nurmagomedov’s fight purse pending a review of the chaos.

But you know who seems totally cool with what transpired? Conor McGregor.

Here’s what the Irish superstar said on both Twitter and Instagram afterwards:

 

View this post on Instagram

 

I’ll be back.

A post shared by Conor McGregor Official (@thenotoriousmma) on

As for Khabib’s teammates who were arrested, McGregor even declined to press charges.

Those dudes ganged up on him and attacked him from behind. And McGregor is cool with that!

We’ll never know for sure, but I suspect that, had McGregor won the fight, he wouldn’t have spit on Nurmagomedov and attacked his team. He might have actually been respectful – complimentary even.

Here’s champ Daniel Cormier giving his two cents:

The post Conor McGregor Seems Totally Cool With What Happened Last Night appeared first on Caged Insider.

Caged Insider

Conor McGregor Seems Totally Cool With What Happened Last Night

At UFC 229, former champ Conor McGregor took a beating at the hands of reigning champ Khabib Nurmagomedov. Then, because of all the bad blood between them, Khabib spat on Conor, climbed over the cage, and leaped into the audience to scrap with McGregor’s teammate, Dillon Danis.

To make matters worse, Khabib’s teammates scampered over the side of the cage and attacked McGregor. It was total bedlam, and it ended with Las Vegas police escorting McGregor backstage.

A dismayed UFC boss Dana White made it clear that some of Khabib’s teammates were subsequently arrested. And for sure the Nevada State Athletic Commission was withholding Nurmagomedov’s fight purse pending a review of the chaos.

But you know who seems totally cool with what transpired? Conor McGregor.

Here’s what the Irish superstar said on both Twitter and Instagram afterwards:

 

View this post on Instagram

 

I’ll be back.

A post shared by Conor McGregor Official (@thenotoriousmma) on

As for Khabib’s teammates who were arrested, McGregor even declined to press charges.

Those dudes ganged up on him and attacked him from behind. And McGregor is cool with that!

We’ll never know for sure, but I suspect that, had McGregor won the fight, he wouldn’t have spit on Nurmagomedov and attacked his team. He might have actually been respectful – complimentary even.

Here’s champ Daniel Cormier giving his two cents:

The post Conor McGregor Seems Totally Cool With What Happened Last Night appeared first on Caged Insider.

Caged Insider

Conor McGregor Seems Totally Cool With What Happened Last Night

At UFC 229, former champ Conor McGregor took a beating at the hands of reigning champ Khabib Nurmagomedov. Then, because of all the bad blood between them, Khabib spat on Conor, climbed over the cage, and leaped into the audience to scrap with McGregor’s teammate, Dillon Danis.

To make matters worse, Khabib’s teammates scampered over the side of the cage and attacked McGregor. It was total bedlam, and it ended with Las Vegas police escorting McGregor backstage.

A dismayed UFC boss Dana White made it clear that some of Khabib’s teammates were subsequently arrested. And for sure the Nevada State Athletic Commission was withholding Nurmagomedov’s fight purse pending a review of the chaos.

But you know who seems totally cool with what transpired? Conor McGregor.

Here’s what the Irish superstar said on both Twitter and Instagram afterwards:

 

View this post on Instagram

 

I’ll be back.

A post shared by Conor McGregor Official (@thenotoriousmma) on

As for Khabib’s teammates who were arrested, McGregor even declined to press charges.

Those dudes ganged up on him and attacked him from behind. And McGregor is cool with that!

We’ll never know for sure, but I suspect that, had McGregor won the fight, he wouldn’t have spit on Nurmagomedov and attacked his team. He might have actually been respectful – complimentary even.

Here’s champ Daniel Cormier giving his two cents:

The post Conor McGregor Seems Totally Cool With What Happened Last Night appeared first on Caged Insider.

Caged Insider

Midnight Mania! UFC 225 Didn’t Totally Bomb After All?

Bringing you the weird and wild from the world of MMA each and every weeknight …

Welcome to Midnight Mania!

UFC 225 didn’t do quite as dismal box office numbers as originally thought; instead of less than 150,000 pay-per-view (PPV) buys, MMAFighting.com reports that the event did 250,000 buys, including both digital and cable purchases.

The main event was a scintillating “Fight of the Year“ candidate between Robert Whittaker and Yoel Romero. Last minute hijinks, with Romero missing weight by four ounces or so, may have affected how viewers perceived the stakes of the event. The card also featured former bantamweight champion Holly Holm, former heavyweight champion Andrei Arlovski, and former lightweight champion Rafael Dos Anjos in an interim welterweight title bout. Notably, this was former professional wrestler CM Punk’s second attempt at MMA; he suffered his second loss in as many fights. His first attempt, at UFC 203, did significantly better at 450,000 buys, with Punk contributing probably 150,000 of those buys. It seems the aura of mystery around Punk has dissipated, and with it any crossover appeal he possessed.

Compared to original reports, this is good news, if not great news; it puts this event roughly in the same realm as UFC 222 with Cris Cyborg vs. Yana Kunitskaya, ahead of events like UFC 221 with Romero knocking out Luke Rockhold, or UFC 224 with Nunes defendering her title against Raquel Pennington, and behind UFC 220, which featured both Daniel Cormier and Stipe Miocic, and the cursed UFC 223, with Khabib Nurmagomedov vs. Al Iaquinta. This summer’s crossover blockbuster, the extremely stacked UFC 226, will likely smash these numbers as well.

It seems the adamant UFC lawyer insisting early reports were ‘fake news’ was right this time.


Insomnia

I’m a little mad they look alike

Just deadly anti-jiu-jitsu here:

Derrick Lewis posted this and … yeah … someone come get your dad.

A post shared by Derrick Lewis (@thebeastufc) on

Brazilian MMA stars trying to remember Brazilian soccer trivia is somehow very entertaining.

Chad Mendes working on that explosiveness ahead of his summer return against Myles Jury.

I’m actually looking forward to Demetrious Johnson vs. Henry Cejudo 2, thank you very much.

Johnson vs Cejudo 2: The Squeakquel

A post shared by COMBAT SPORTS / MARTIAL ARTS (@thestranglesquad) on

Eddie Alvarez vs. Dustin Poirier 2 is the sequel of the summer, though

Ronda Rousey will eventually win it all

Al Iaquinta Realty is one of the better parody accounts out there

#MMAFCUK :… Ragin’ Al ‘Real estate’ Iaquinta just made me piss my pants #HomeOwner

A post shared by #MMAFCUK (@mma_fightcentraluk) on

That’s … a pretty intense kick to be thrown in training!

This isn’t racially coded at all

Fuck, they got me there

A post shared by COMBAT SPORTS / MARTIAL ARTS (@thestranglesquad) on

No can defend

The perfect gun disarm? ➖➖➖➖➖➖➖➖➖➖➖ Sponsored by @jitzsoap

A post shared by McDojoLife (@mcdojolife) on

When “keep your hands up” is life

Rate @vladimirmyshev training out of 10

A post shared by MMA Бокс Boxeo Wrestling (@boxingband) on

This weekend in combat sports

Rate @vladimirmyshev training out of 10

A post shared by MMA Бокс Boxeo Wrestling (@boxingband) on


Slips, Rips, and KO Clips

This elbow battle had a clear winner

Boxing has been great for a long time

Roberto Duran- Greatest lightweight of all time.. – #legend #sweetscience #boxing

A post shared by Mads Burnell (@madsburnell) on

A 16-year-old Mike Tyson had some slippery head movement


Quick Hits


Podcasts and Video

Firaz Zahabi joined Joe Rogan

Daniel Cormier vs. Frank Mir was not a depressing fight at all, I don’t know what this podcast is talking about

Wait… LESS stacked cards?

Stay woke, Maniacs! Follow me on Twitter and Facebook @Vorpality

MMAmania.com – All Posts

Anthony Pettis warns Conor McGregor: ‘155 is a totally different world’

When Anthony Pettis signed to fight Eddie Alvarez at UFC Fight Night 81, he did so with an implicit understanding that a win would vault him back into the title picture. That was back in September though, before Conor McGregor ended 10 years of featherweight royalty with 13 seconds of brilliance, and things ceased being so simple.

Now the future of the lightweight division effectively hinges on McGregor’s next move. If the man with the numbers elects to move up and challenge for Rafael dos Anjos‘ title — an announcement which appears to be a mere formality at this point — then the rest of the 155-pound division will have little recourse but to take a backseat and watch the spectacle play out.

So what does it all mean for Pettis? Well, for starters his Jan. 17 meeting with Alvarez suddenly looks a lot less like the No. 1 contender fight he envisioned when he signed on the dotted line. However after wading through another round of injuries and delays, Pettis understands better than most that few things are guaranteed in the land of four-ounce gloves.

“I don’t even care, man. Give me Conor McGregor at this point,” Pettis told MMA Fighting. “I really don’t care, honestly. I want to go out and prove that I’m the best in the world with or without the belt. If they give me the title shot, I’ll take it. If they want to give me McGregor, I’ll take it. If they want to move me down to ’45, I really don’t care right now. I’m so content and motivated with that burning fire to be the best in the world again. The UFC makes promises to guys, they come out and they say things that don’t always happen, man.

“I’ve seen it a million times, so I’m not going to stress myself out over a title shot or who’s next in line. If they’re going to make money on Conor, I’m sure they’ll give [the title shot] to Conor. But I’ll tell you this, Conor going to 155 is a totally different world. I mean, he’s not going to go up there and look like the Conor of 145. That’s why Jose Aldo never moved to 155.”

The idea of a collision course between the featherweight and lightweight titles is not a new one. Pettis himself was nearly involved in a similar scenario in 2014, when talks of Aldo moving up to 155 pounds and vying for Pettis’ belt briefly picked up momentum before dying on the vine. Prior to that, Pettis agreed to drop to featherweight and challenge Aldo at UFC 163, although the fight was ultimately scrapped once Pettis tore his meniscus.

In that regard, having prepared for Aldo in the past, Pettis respects the significance of what McGregor accomplished at UFC 194, along with the unorthodox, movement-centric regimen which the Irishman preaches.

“That whole movement thing is traditional martial arts,” Pettis said. “It’s real talk. I live by it as well. If you go in there and you try to bang with somebody, you kind of take away your edge, you start getting hit more. It becomes a kickboxing or a boxing fight. In martial arts, mixed martial arts, you use that range, that movement, that different pace, guys aren’t used to that, and Conor is having some success with it. My whole career is based on that.

“MMA fans are so quick to judge or jump onto the next train or jump onto the next thing, if he would’ve lost, people would’ve been talking like, oh, movement ain’t nothing. But it definitely is important. Movement is huge in mixed martial arts. It’s huge in fighting. Understanding distance. Understanding where the power in your punch is. Not just being a strong, brutal guy. I don’t want to fight with force. I like to fight with accuracy.”

That being said, Pettis doesn’t expect to see many fighters emulating McGregor’s unique approach, if only because it takes a special type of athlete to have success with it.

“Everybody can’t do it,” Pettis said. “Not everybody can do this kind of movement. Not everybody’s bodies are made to do this. That’s why I love mixed martial arts. You have to find what style works for your body type, because I mean, Conor has a 74-inch reach. Of course he is using his range. Frankie Edgar, not so much. He has to use his inside boxing and wrestling. So it’s the kind of body types that create these fights, and it’s why these fights are interesting.”

MMA Fighting – All Posts

John Dodson: ‘I’ll Be a Totally Different Fighter Against Demetrious Johnson’

John Dodson will be the first to admit that he did not deliver a vintage “Magician” performance at UFC 187.
Recent News on Sherdog.com

Chris Weidman: Luke Rockhold was great vs. Lyoto Machida, but I’m ‘a totally different ball game’

Chris Weidman was in an awkward position on the FOX Sports post-fight show. Luke Rockhold had just called him out after his big submission win over Lyoto Machida. And Rockhold’s teammate Daniel Cormier was sitting right next to him on the panel, stirring the pot.

Weidman, though, more than held his own with the microphone in front of him at the conclusion of UFC on FOX 15 on Saturday night.

“He is a very well-rounded fighter, but he doesn’t have an expertise in anything,” Weidman said of Rockhold. “I think that’s going to be the problem he has to face with me. I’m a master at wrestling, I’m a master in jiu-jitsu. Striking, I’m an expert in as well. I’m the best at everything. He’s in trouble.”

By the end of that statement, the UFC middleweight champion had a smile on his face. He was half-joking, but Weidman is the same guy who told everyone he would beat Anderson Silva and went out and did it — twice. The New Yorker is supremely confident and he firmly believes he will beat Rockhold when the time comes.

“It’s all about matchups,” Weidman said. “He did great against Lyoto Machida, but that’s not me. He’s gonna have to deal with a whole different game plan. A totally different ball game.”

Weidman will first have to defend his title against Vitor Belfort in the co-main event of UFC 187 on May 23 in Las Vegas. UFC president Dana White would not say that Rockhold would be next in line if Weidman gets past Belfort, but Weidman surely thinks he is. The other potential opponent could be Ronaldo Souza, who submitted Chris Camozzi in the co-main event Saturday.

It’s hard to top Rockhold’s dominant win over a former light heavyweight champion in Machida, though.

“Amazing performance by Luke Rockhold, but I got May 23 to worry about with Vitor Belfort and [Rockhold] will be the next guy in line,” Weidman said. “I’m waiting on my throne right now with my belt. Very comfortable.”

The undefeated Weidman (12-0) has already beaten Machida, but it was by unanimous decision last July at UFC 175. Rockhold later came on the post-fight show set and the shared some laughs and a little light-hearted trash talk. Weidman said he would “smoke” Rockhold on the ground. Rockhold fired back with more confident statements.

The two men are friendly. And Cormier was sitting between them instigating. But none of the talk will matter. There’s a pretty good chance the two will meet and it could happen before the end of the year. Rockhold already laid out the possibility of it being at the UFC’s first event in New York. The promotion has a date set for December at Madison Square Garden.

Weidman would be more than cool with that. He could ride the Long Island Railroad all the way in with the middleweight belt on his shoulder. Rockhold at The World’s Most Famous Arena is just the kind of primetime battle he wants.

“You want a division full of beasts that come up and make big fights,” Weidman said. “You don’t want bums in your weight class.”

MMA Fighting – All Posts

Claudia Gadelha’s Sucker-Punch ‘Totally Different’ Than Paul Daley’s, According to Mind-Reading UFC President


(“You can’t put the slap back in the jar.” — Traditional Italian proverb that I just made up. / Photo via Getty)

By Trent Reinsmith

Dana White can see into your soul. At least, that’s sort of what the UFC president implied after Claudia Gadelha sucker-punched Joanna Jedrzejczyk following their strawweight fight at Saturday’s UFC on Fox 13 event.

The incident played out in a way that was very similar to the late punch that Paul Daley threw at Josh Koscheck after their UFC 113 fight had come to its conclusion. White wasted little time firing Daley from the UFC after his late strike, telling those at the post-fight press conference: “He’s done. I don’t give a shit if he’s the best 170-pounder in the world. He’ll never come back here again…I’m probably the most lenient guy in sports. And this is probably one of the most lenient organizations. We’re all human, we all make mistakes, things happen. There’s no excuse for that. These guys are professional athletes. You don’t ever hit a guy blatantly after the bell like that whether you’re frustrated or not. It was probably one of the dumbest things I’ve ever seen…I don’t care if he fights in every show all over the world and becomes the best and everybody thinks he’s the pound-for-pound best in the world. He will never fight in the UFC ever again.”

I guess you could argue that due to the nature of the sport (basically punching another individual in the head), Daley should have gotten off with a strong warning, but White went with the nuclear option and permabanned Daley on the spot.

So, when Gadelha did pretty much the exact same thing after her fight with Jedrzejczyk had come to a close, the expectation would have been for White to appear at the UFC on Fox 13 post-fight press conference red-faced with anger. He didn’t — White more or less just shrugged it off.

The UFC president said of Gadelha’s actions, “People were going crazy on that one. She hit her after the bell, she did this, she did that.’ And then of course everybody goes back to Daley. ‘You kicked Daley out for that.’ The difference is this: when Daley did it to Koscheck, I was in there, and I went up to Daley because he was getting pulled around, and he didn’t care. He didn’t give a s–t. He looked right at me and said he didn’t care. As soon as (Gadelha) did it to (Jedrzejczyk), she reached her hand out and she apologized to her. She said ‘I’m sorry, I’m sorry.’ She apologized.” White then added, “Those two had a war. They’re in the heat of a battle. She landed a kick and then the bell rang, and then she hit her with a punch. And then she completely apologized for doing it. Totally different scenario.”

Yeah, no. It’s the same thing. She punched her opponent after the horn had sounded to end the fight. The only difference is that prior to this fight Gadelha was being touted as a potential title contender in a very thin weight class. In other words, the UFC needs to keep her around for the sake of the strawweight division. Daley was more or less expendable at the time he committed his foul.

White’s “she completely apologized” excuse for not punishing Gadelha for the illegal strike is almost as laughable as UFC commentator Joe Rogan’s claim of, “I don’t think she was trying to hit her there, I think she was trying to like high five her or something.”

Remorse or lack of remorse should have nothing to do with how these things are dealt with because there’s no way to tell if the remorse is legitimate or feigned. When someone is caught red-handed doing something they shouldn’t, of course they’re going to go through some sort of calculation as to how they can get out of trouble or at least minimize the punishment. (For the record, Daley apologized the next day after cheap-shotting Koscheck.)

How White can discern the level of real remorse that Gadelha had after the late punch is beyond me. Yet there he was proclaiming that he knew that Gadelha was sorry for her actions because, you know, she acted like she was sorry. If that’s all it takes to get out of trouble with White, one can only imagine the havoc that his children get away with.

The bottom line is Gadelha broke the same rule that Daley did in pretty much the same way Daley did, and she walked away from it without even getting a stern look from the UFC boss.

In other words, hypocritical business as usual for the UFC’s head honcho.

Cagepotato

Jussier Formiga ‘not totally happy’ with his performance, targets Ian McCall rematch

Jussier Formiga won an important fight against Zach Makovsky, scoring back-to-back for the first time under the UFC banner, but he wouldn’t call it the best win of his MMA career.

The Nova Uniao flyweight, who defeated the former Bellator bantamweight champion via unanimous decision at the UFC Fight Night 47 card in Bangor, Maine, on Aug. 16, was disappointed with his third round against Makovsky.

“I’m not totally happy with my performance because of the last round. I knew that was his strongest position, the single leg takedown, but he still took me down,” Formiga told MMAFighting.com.

“The first two rounds were exactly as I planned, but he was able to take me down in the third. He wasn’t offering me much trouble on the ground with his ground and pound, so I decided to stay there and control the fight until the end.

“I will fix this mistake for my next fight. I want an impeccable performance in my next fight. I want three perfect rounds, and it would be even better if I can end it earlier”

The last man to beat flyweight title contender Chris Cariaso, Formiga is open to fighting for the UFC belt next against the winner of Cariaso vs. Demetrious Johnson, but is down to fighting one more time.

“Man, I’m excited just to think about it,” he said. “Fighting for the UFC title would be great, the best. I fought well in this fight, and I will fight even better in my next fight. It’s up to the UFC. If they want to give me another fight, I’m fine with it. I wanted to be at the top 5 after this fight, and here I am. This fight was good to show the UFC fans that I’m one of the best.”

John Dodson and Joseph Benavidez, the only fighters to beat Formiga under the UFC banner, already had their shots for the flyweight championship. Ian McCall is the other man to handle the Brazilian a loss, and that’s the fight Formiga wants.

“I will fight whoever they want, but I’m still bitter about my loss to McCall,” Formiga said. “I fought him three years ago, it was a tough fight, and he ended up defeating me. I wasn’t so physically strong by that time, I wasn’t in a good moment in my career. I can do much better against him. If I could choose my next opponent, I’d choose to fight him.”

McCall and Formiga are currently ranked No. 3 and 4 in the UFC rankings, respectively, and the Brazilian expects another close match-up against the Tachi Palace Fights 125-pound champion. The pair of flyweights battled for three rounds at Tachi PF 8 in February 2011, and McCall won the decision.

“I think it would be fifty, fifty,” he said. “When I fought him, he was heavier than me. He was coming from WEC, where he fought as a bantamweight, and I gave him a tough fight. I think it would be a closer match-up this time.”

MMA Fighting – All Posts

Old rifts aside, Dana White believes ‘totally different’ Jon Jones capable of being sport’s best ever

BALTIMORE, Md. — The relationship between UFC President Dana White and UFC light heavyweight Jon Jones has not always or even consistently been harmonious. Even today, Jones doesn’t seem to regard it as particularly special. That doesn’t mean, however, that things aren’t in a position that isn’t mutually advantageous.

Two days out from Jones’ next title defense at UFC 172, White is insistent he’s on Jones’ side. As proof, the UFC executive is ready to heap praise on a fighter that is capable of achieving unparallelled greatness even if the pair don’t share tight friendship.

“I don’t know. I think if you keep winning the way that he wins, you might not have to like him, but you’ll definitely respect him,” White said of Jones at Thursday’s Ultimate Media Day.

“I say it all the time, look at what he’s accomplished. Look at what he’s done at such a young age. The guys he beat, the guys he’s gone through. And look at who he has in front of him, who is not a five-to-one underdog. After this he’s got [Alexander] Gustafsson and possibly [Daniel] Cormier. He hasn’t had an easy road and it’s not looking any easier for him, but those are the kind of fights that create your legacy. If this kid wins the next three fights, it’s hard not to call him the greatest light heavyweight ever. What do you call him after these next three fights?”

For White, perhaps he doesn’t have much to say in praise of Jones. It’s possible he cannot summon a friendly word about Jones’ fighter ethos or friendliness or the strength of their bond. Perhaps he doesn’t have to. If all else fails, White is ready to point to Jones’ resume, something he suggests no skeptic in the world could possibly deny.

“Look at who he beat and the next three that he’s got. If he beats Glover on Saturday, he continued, he’ll fight again towards the end of the year, which will be Gustafsson. Then at the beginning of next year he’ll fight either Cormier or Henderson. If he wins those two fights, what will he be, 27 [years of age]? 27 years old and he’ll have beat all those people. It’s just, I don’t know, man. It’s pretty crazy.”

White, however, isn’t dismissive of the bumpy path both have taken to arrive at this moment. In a unique twist of events, he’s even willing to acknowledge it’s not simply someone else’s fault, but a mutual failing.

“Anything’s possible, but I think the rough road for Jones is behind us. We had our moments. He had his moments when he became a star and started making a lot of money. I think he’s over all that. I don’t see that happening again, but anything’s possible.

“I think he’s a totally different guy now. I even had my doubts after the Gustafsson fight, but he’s bounced back from that, too. His attitude has changed. When you take your first ass whipping, the guy had never been in a fight like that in his life. He dominated everybody that he fought. Then he went in against Gustafsson and that fight was a war.”

“And everybody here saw and fans all around the world saw it: he was in deep water and kept fighting and came out with that elbow,” White continued. “He came out and fought the fifth round like he wanted to win the fifth round. He wanted to win that fight and keep the title. It takes a lot, man. It takes a lot to do that. I guarantee those two guys felt closer to death than they ever had in their whole life and when you fight through something like that, it’s just, it makes you a different person one way or the other. You either don’t want to do that again or you rise to the occasion and realize you’re the champ. I think Jones did that,” White concluded matter of factly.

Nevertheless, there’s a palpable coldness between the two, if more from Jones’ side than White’s. It isn’t a cold war, exactly, but it’s enough chill to feel. For the UFC President, though, it’s a situation he doesn’t see as particularly bad nor one he can meaningfully improve. And ultimately, it’s not about their past. It’s only Jones’ future that matters.

“Could I say more good things about him? He’s on the right track. He’s on his way to possibly being the greatest ever. Maybe he’s the greatest ever in three fights. He might be.

“Whether you like Jon Jones or you don’t like Jon Jones, you can’t deny what he’s done. What he’s done is unbelievable. He choked [Lyoto] Machida unconscious. He destroyed Shogun [Rua] in minutes. All these guys that he’s walked through. It’s unbelievable. No matter how much you love Gustafsson – I love Gustafsson – I love the way he fights, I love his attitude, I love everything. I don’t care if you f–king hate Jon Jones, you cannot deny he won that fight. He won that fight.”

“If he gets through [Teixeira] and the next two fights, I don’t know what we’re even talking about here. He might be the greatest ever.”

MMA Fighting – All Posts