Tag Archive for stupid’

White: Blaming UFC For Khabib-McGregor Brawl A ‘Stupid Opinion’

There seems to be a lot of finger pointing in the aftermath of UFC 229, the mixed martial arts (MMA) pay-per-view (PPV) that ended with Khabib Nurmagomedov submitting Conor McGregor in the main event (highlights), then diving into the crowd to brawl with “Notorious” teammate Dillon Danis (replay here).

The lightweight “Eagle” believes the combat sports media is to blame for promoting trash talkers like McGregor, who hold nothing back during the build up to a fight and cut loose on family, religion, politics, and whatever else is deemed fair game.

Outspoken pundits (like this guy), meanwhile, are holding the promotion accountable for its “Bad Blood” narrative while hyping the Khabib-McGregor feud, suggesting that Dana White lit the fuse — then feigned surprise when the bomb went off.

“Dumbest quote I ever heard in my life, you’re an idiot whoever wrote that,” White told ESPN’s First Take. “The way that we promoted this fight was exactly the way that this thing played out. That’s all part of the storyline. Almost 20 years we’ve been doing this, we’ve had plenty of fights where there’s tons of bad blood and we don’t have fights after the fights. We have scuffles with guys in the back, I mean this is the fight business and a lot of people don’t like each other. That’s a stupid opinion.”

It should be noted the “Bad Blood” video preview was taken down immediately after the event. I think now is also a good time to point out that White grants leniency to troublesome fighters, so long as they do gangbusters at the box office.

Even though it often leads to this.

McGregor was in hot water earlier this year for his Brooklyn bus attack (video) and found himself in front of the local magistrate to answer for his crimes. While the end result for Nurmagomedov is likely to be much less dramatic, “The Eagle” will still need to appear before Nevada State Athletic Commission (NSAC) and face potential disciplinary action.

Let’s hope UFC has a camera there to capture footage for marketing a potential Khabib-McGregor rematch.

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Insurance Doesn’t Cover ‘Stupid French People’ Like GSP

Former Ultimate Fighting Championship (UFC) welterweight champion Georges St-Pierre, who also held (and surrendered) gold in the middleweight division, is showing mixed martial arts (MMA) fans his humorous side in this latest Instragram video.

Which might be the funniest wheelchair joke since Seinfeld’s “The Handicap Spot.”

“I’m with my friend Spencer and I wanna try his wheelchair,” St-Pierre said in the above video. “I want to take a drive with his wheelchair but he doesn’t want to let me drive!”

Probably because he’s afraid of “Rush” getting abducted by aliens.

“That’s correct,” Spencer responded. “Because my insurance doesn’t cover stupid French people.”

St-Pierre (26-2), who turned 37 back in May, has been battling health problems after ballooning up to 185 pounds. In fact, “Rush” is so happy to be shedding the extra skin, he’s actually contemplating a “bitch” drop to the lightweight division.

Where the winner of this fight would undoubtedly fulfill that “legacy” requirement.

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Floyd Mayweather’s trainer worried Conor McGregor might go crazy, do something stupid to get disqualified on Aug. 26

There’s a major UFC event this weekend, roughly 24 hours after Bellator MMA fires off one of the best fight cards in its entire history. Unfortunately, nobody is clicking on those posts, so I’m forced to revert back to the Floyd Mayweather vs. Conor McGregor hype.

You have no one to blame but yourselves.

This latest angle comes from Mayweather’s assistant trainer Nate Jones, who is convinced “Money” will defeat the “Notorious” interloper when they collide this August, assuming McGregor doesn’t go crazy and do something stupid.

From his conversation with Submission Radio:

“One way I can see the fight ending is Floyd outboxing him, beating the crap out of him. Another way I’m gonna be concerned about is when Floyd gets to a point where he frustrates him too much, McGregor’s gonna do something crazy. That’s the only thing I’m worried about. He’s 40 years old, McGregor has crazy weird power and he’s got weird shots from weird angles. I’m worried about that. But for my prediction in the fight, is Floyd either confusing him and frustrating him and stopping him in the later rounds or Floyd outboxing him or he doing something stupid and losing the fight. That’s my prediction.”

Blame Joe Rogan for planting that seed.

McGregor, one of the best mixed martial arts (MMA) fighters on the planet, is contractually obligated to keep this bout strictly boxing. That means elbow, knees in the clinch, and other punishing moves from his world of cage fighting are barred.

According to this guy, he may not even need them.

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UFC 210: Gegard Mousasi would be closer to a title shot if not for ‘stupid’ matchmaking

With a win over Chris Weidman at the upcoming UFC 210 pay-per-view (PPV) event — which is all set to go down on April 8, 2017 in Buffalo, New York — Gegard Mousasi inches himself closer to his first-ever UFC title shot.

But, he will have to wait a bit longer, though, as the upcoming Middleweight title fight between division king and Georges St-Pierre has really muddled up the division that already had plenty of worthy contenders for “The Count” to face.

“The UFC is making these fights that don’t make any sense,” Mousasi said. “Dan Henderson and now (Georges St-Pierre), so if they would have done it the correct way, Romero would have fought for his belt, (Ronaldo) ‘Jacare’ (Souza) would have got his shot by now, and I would have been afterwards. But because of this fight (between Bisping and St-Pierre) that really doesn’t make any sense, the No. 1 contenders have to wait,” said Mousasi in a recent interview with MMA Junkie.

Indeed, Romero was promised his shot at the strap before “Rush” decided to come back into the picture. That said, he, along with Souza and Mousasi have to wait a bit longer to fulfill their championship dreams.

Even if he gets a win over “All American,” Gegard isn’t too sure he’ll have to fight yet again to earn his shot. And it’s all thanks to the “stupid” matchmaking

“Let’s say after this fight, I have to put everything on the line again to get a win, and then fight for the title, where it actually should have been me already if the UFC hadn’t made those stupid fights.”

This guy feels your pain, Mousasi.

For more on the upcoming UFC 210 PPV event click here and here.

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Lorenz Larkin on free agency: ‘If fighters fight in the UFC just to say I’m a UFC fighter, that’s stupid’

Lorenz Larkin had one fight left in his deal with the UFC when he was offered a fight against Neil Magny at UFC 202 in August. The promotion reached out to him before the bout to try and re-sign him, but the California-native calls the offer a “slap in the face.” Three months have passed since his win, and he’s still yet to sign a new contract.

“I’m kind of disappointed when it comes to the whole side of the UFC because it’s such a long waiting period, especially when everything first happened, the way it came to me (about) re-signing a new deal before my Magny fight,” Larkin told Ariel Helwani on Monday’s edition of The MMA Hour. “I just thought the offer they threw at me was kind of a slap in the face and I didn’t want to agree to that.

“So we were like ‘ok, just fight your last fight of the contract,’ and I felt like that was a slap in the face because I kind of felt like they are betting against me, you know what I mean? It was just kind of like, ‘Magny is on a tear, he’s the beast and his accomplishments speak for itself,’ and I felt like the UFC was like ‘he’ll take this fight, he probably won’t get past Magny, and then we’ll re-sign him.’”

Larkin admits he felt “really good” proving the UFC wrong and knocking Magny out in the first round at UFC 202, but was surprised that the promotion hasn’t reached out to make any offer since the bout. Larkin says he knows there’s interest, but thought he would have signed a deal by now.

After being forced to sit for three months before testing free agency and getting offers from other promotions, Larkin says the whole situation involving free agency benefits the UFC.

“I try to look at everything from a fighter’s aspect and from a business aspect, and from a business’s aspect, I get it,” Larkin said of the three-month period before talking to other companies. “There are not too many guys that wanna wait three months and they just accept whatever is thrown at him. So that three months, I felt that those three months puts in you that mode that you don’t really wanna wait. You just kind of wanna get things settled and go with the flow, go with it. That three months thing is tailored towards them.”

“I know they are very interested,” he said of the UFC. “I think things since my fight have been really chaotic with the UFC, with everything that’s happened. I’m pretty sure I’ll know something within a week or so. I’m hoping for.”

Before joining the UFC in 2013, Larkin racked up an impressive 4-0 record with one no-contest as a middleweight and light heavyweight in Strikeforce, capped off by a win over Robbie Lawler, and reveled that his managers contacted former Strikeforce head Scott Coker, who now runs Bellator.

“My management spoke with Bellator and they are very interested in talking with me,” he said. “That’s a good thing. And I know RIZIN is interested, too. I feel like there’s interest there.”

With four fights in his past five bouts, including three knockout finishes, Larkin will go wherever the best offer is instead of just staying in the UFC regardless.

“If the promotion doesn’t believe in me, then what’s the point?” he says. “I’m kind of seasoned now. It’s not the thing I just want to be cool and tell people I fight in the UFC. That doesn’t do anything for me. Every fighter, they want a promotion to believe in them and believe they can do something and maybe put a little push behind you. I understand I won’t get pushed with everybody, but I feel like I have talent, I’m a fan-favorite to watch, I have an exciting style, I’m not boring in the cage, so my whole thing is, ‘use it.’

“I don’t wanna just fight. I’m not saying I wanna commentate or something like that, but use me, market me, just stuff like that. I’m under contract, put me to work. I’m not scared to work, you know? Any promotion, it doesn’t have anything to do with the name. If fighters fight in the UFC just to say I’m a UFC fighter, that’s stupid.”

Larkin says the plan is to sign a contract soon, and he’s confident he will get a good one.

“I think I’m gonna get what I’m happy with,” Larkin said. “I have all the tools for anything that makes sense. I feel like I’m exciting, I feel like I bring it every time I get in there, and in a style that people like to see. I feel like I have the tools that argue with the point I’m trying to make.”

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Lorenz Larkin on free agency: ‘If fighters fight in the UFC just to say I’m a UFC fighter, that’s stupid’

Lorenz Larkin had one fight left in his deal with the UFC when he was offered a fight against Neil Magny at UFC 202 in August. The promotion reached out to him before the bout to try and re-sign him, but the California-native calls the offer a “slap in the face.” Three months have passed since his win, and he’s still yet to sign a new contract.

“I’m kind of disappointed when it comes to the whole side of the UFC because it’s such a long waiting period, especially when everything first happened, the way it came to me (about) re-signing a new deal before my Magny fight,” Larkin told Ariel Helwani on Monday’s edition of The MMA Hour. “I just thought the offer they threw at me was kind of a slap in the face and I didn’t want to agree to that.

“So we were like ‘ok, just fight your last fight of the contract,’ and I felt like that was a slap in the face because I kind of felt like they are betting against me, you know what I mean? It was just kind of like, ‘Magny is on a tear, he’s the beast and his accomplishments speak for itself,’ and I felt like the UFC was like ‘he’ll take this fight, he probably won’t get past Magny, and then we’ll re-sign him.’”

Larkin admits he felt “really good” proving the UFC wrong and knocking Magny out in the first round at UFC 202, but was surprised that the promotion hasn’t reached out to make any offer since the bout. Larkin says he knows there’s interest, but thought he would have signed a deal by now.

After being forced to sit for three months before testing free agency and getting offers from other promotions, Larkin says the whole situation involving free agency benefits the UFC.

“I try to look at everything from a fighter’s aspect and from a business aspect, and from a business’s aspect, I get it,” Larkin said of the three-month period before talking to other companies. “There are not too many guys that wanna wait three months and they just accept whatever is thrown at him. So that three months, I felt that those three months puts in you that mode that you don’t really wanna wait. You just kind of wanna get things settled and go with the flow, go with it. That three months thing is tailored towards them.”

“I know they are very interested,” he said of the UFC. “I think things since my fight have been really chaotic with the UFC, with everything that’s happened. I’m pretty sure I’ll know something within a week or so. I’m hoping for.”

Before joining the UFC in 2013, Larkin racked up an impressive 4-0 record with one no-contest as a middleweight and light heavyweight in Strikeforce, capped off by a win over Robbie Lawler, and reveled that his managers contacted former Strikeforce head Scott Coker, who now runs Bellator.

“My management spoke with Bellator and they are very interested in talking with me,” he said. “That’s a good thing. And I know RIZIN is interested, too. I feel like there’s interest there.”

With four fights in his past five bouts, including three knockout finishes, Larkin will go wherever the best offer is instead of just staying in the UFC regardless.

“If the promotion doesn’t believe in me, then what’s the point?” he says. “I’m kind of seasoned now. It’s not the thing I just want to be cool and tell people I fight in the UFC. That doesn’t do anything for me. Every fighter, they want a promotion to believe in them and believe they can do something and maybe put a little push behind you. I understand I won’t get pushed with everybody, but I feel like I have talent, I’m a fan-favorite to watch, I have an exciting style, I’m not boring in the cage, so my whole thing is, ‘use it.’

“I don’t wanna just fight. I’m not saying I wanna commentate or something like that, but use me, market me, just stuff like that. I’m under contract, put me to work. I’m not scared to work, you know? Any promotion, it doesn’t have anything to do with the name. If fighters fight in the UFC just to say I’m a UFC fighter, that’s stupid.”

Larkin says the plan is to sign a contract soon, and he’s confident he will get a good one.

“I think I’m gonna get what I’m happy with,” Larkin said. “I have all the tools for anything that makes sense. I feel like I’m exciting, I feel like I bring it every time I get in there, and in a style that people like to see. I feel like I have the tools that argue with the point I’m trying to make.”

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Lorenz Larkin on free agency: ‘If fighters fight in the UFC just to say I’m a UFC fighter, that’s stupid’

Lorenz Larkin had one fight left in his deal with the UFC when he was offered a fight against Neil Magny at UFC 202 in August. The promotion reached out to him before the bout to try and re-sign him, but the California-native calls the offer a “slap in the face.” Three months have passed since his win, and he’s still yet to sign a new contract.

“I’m kind of disappointed when it comes to the whole side of the UFC because it’s such a long waiting period, especially when everything first happened, the way it came to me (about) re-signing a new deal before my Magny fight,” Larkin told Ariel Helwani on Monday’s edition of The MMA Hour. “I just thought the offer they threw at me was kind of a slap in the face and I didn’t want to agree to that.

“So we were like ‘ok, just fight your last fight of the contract,’ and I felt like that was a slap in the face because I kind of felt like they are betting against me, you know what I mean? It was just kind of like, ‘Magny is on a tear, he’s the beast and his accomplishments speak for itself,’ and I felt like the UFC was like ‘he’ll take this fight, he probably won’t get past Magny, and then we’ll re-sign him.’”

Larkin admits he felt “really good” proving the UFC wrong and knocking Magny out in the first round at UFC 202, but was surprised that the promotion hasn’t reached out to make any offer since the bout. Larkin says he knows there’s interest, but thought he would have signed a deal by now.

After being forced to sit for three months before testing free agency and getting offers from other promotions, Larkin says the whole situation involving free agency benefits the UFC.

“I try to look at everything from a fighter’s aspect and from a business aspect, and from a business’s aspect, I get it,” Larkin said of the three-month period before talking to other companies. “There are not too many guys that wanna wait three months and they just accept whatever is thrown at him. So that three months, I felt that those three months puts in you that mode that you don’t really wanna wait. You just kind of wanna get things settled and go with the flow, go with it. That three months thing is tailored towards them.”

“I know they are very interested,” he said of the UFC. “I think things since my fight have been really chaotic with the UFC, with everything that’s happened. I’m pretty sure I’ll know something within a week or so. I’m hoping for.”

Before joining the UFC in 2013, Larkin racked up an impressive 4-0 record with one no-contest as a middleweight and light heavyweight in Strikeforce, capped off by a win over Robbie Lawler, and reveled that his managers contacted former Strikeforce head Scott Coker, who now runs Bellator.

“My management spoke with Bellator and they are very interested in talking with me,” he said. “That’s a good thing. And I know RIZIN is interested, too. I feel like there’s interest there.”

With four fights in his past five bouts, including three knockout finishes, Larkin will go wherever the best offer is instead of just staying in the UFC regardless.

“If the promotion doesn’t believe in me, then what’s the point?” he says. “I’m kind of seasoned now. It’s not the thing I just want to be cool and tell people I fight in the UFC. That doesn’t do anything for me. Every fighter, they want a promotion to believe in them and believe they can do something and maybe put a little push behind you. I understand I won’t get pushed with everybody, but I feel like I have talent, I’m a fan-favorite to watch, I have an exciting style, I’m not boring in the cage, so my whole thing is, ‘use it.’

“I don’t wanna just fight. I’m not saying I wanna commentate or something like that, but use me, market me, just stuff like that. I’m under contract, put me to work. I’m not scared to work, you know? Any promotion, it doesn’t have anything to do with the name. If fighters fight in the UFC just to say I’m a UFC fighter, that’s stupid.”

Larkin says the plan is to sign a contract soon, and he’s confident he will get a good one.

“I think I’m gonna get what I’m happy with,” Larkin said. “I have all the tools for anything that makes sense. I feel like I’m exciting, I feel like I bring it every time I get in there, and in a style that people like to see. I feel like I have the tools that argue with the point I’m trying to make.”

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Lorenz Larkin on free agency: ‘If fighters fight in the UFC just to say I’m a UFC fighter, that’s stupid’

Lorenz Larkin had one fight left in his deal with the UFC when he was offered a fight against Neil Magny at UFC 202 in August. The promotion reached out to him before the bout to try and re-sign him, but the California-native calls the offer a “slap in the face.” Three months have passed since his win, and he’s still yet to sign a new contract.

“I’m kind of disappointed when it comes to the whole side of the UFC because it’s such a long waiting period, especially when everything first happened, the way it came to me (about) re-signing a new deal before my Magny fight,” Larkin told Ariel Helwani on Monday’s edition of The MMA Hour. “I just thought the offer they threw at me was kind of a slap in the face and I didn’t want to agree to that.

“So we were like ‘ok, just fight your last fight of the contract,’ and I felt like that was a slap in the face because I kind of felt like they are betting against me, you know what I mean? It was just kind of like, ‘Magny is on a tear, he’s the beast and his accomplishments speak for itself,’ and I felt like the UFC was like ‘he’ll take this fight, he probably won’t get past Magny, and then we’ll re-sign him.’”

Larkin admits he felt “really good” proving the UFC wrong and knocking Magny out in the first round at UFC 202, but was surprised that the promotion hasn’t reached out to make any offer since the bout. Larkin says he knows there’s interest, but thought he would have signed a deal by now.

After being forced to sit for three months before testing free agency and getting offers from other promotions, Larkin says the whole situation involving free agency benefits the UFC.

“I try to look at everything from a fighter’s aspect and from a business aspect, and from a business’s aspect, I get it,” Larkin said of the three-month period before talking to other companies. “There are not too many guys that wanna wait three months and they just accept whatever is thrown at him. So that three months, I felt that those three months puts in you that mode that you don’t really wanna wait. You just kind of wanna get things settled and go with the flow, go with it. That three months thing is tailored towards them.”

“I know they are very interested,” he said of the UFC. “I think things since my fight have been really chaotic with the UFC, with everything that’s happened. I’m pretty sure I’ll know something within a week or so. I’m hoping for.”

Before joining the UFC in 2013, Larkin racked up an impressive 4-0 record with one no-contest as a middleweight and light heavyweight in Strikeforce, capped off by a win over Robbie Lawler, and reveled that his managers contacted former Strikeforce head Scott Coker, who now runs Bellator.

“My management spoke with Bellator and they are very interested in talking with me,” he said. “That’s a good thing. And I know RIZIN is interested, too. I feel like there’s interest there.”

With four fights in his past five bouts, including three knockout finishes, Larkin will go wherever the best offer is instead of just staying in the UFC regardless.

“If the promotion doesn’t believe in me, then what’s the point?” he says. “I’m kind of seasoned now. It’s not the thing I just want to be cool and tell people I fight in the UFC. That doesn’t do anything for me. Every fighter, they want a promotion to believe in them and believe they can do something and maybe put a little push behind you. I understand I won’t get pushed with everybody, but I feel like I have talent, I’m a fan-favorite to watch, I have an exciting style, I’m not boring in the cage, so my whole thing is, ‘use it.’

“I don’t wanna just fight. I’m not saying I wanna commentate or something like that, but use me, market me, just stuff like that. I’m under contract, put me to work. I’m not scared to work, you know? Any promotion, it doesn’t have anything to do with the name. If fighters fight in the UFC just to say I’m a UFC fighter, that’s stupid.”

Larkin says the plan is to sign a contract soon, and he’s confident he will get a good one.

“I think I’m gonna get what I’m happy with,” Larkin said. “I have all the tools for anything that makes sense. I feel like I’m exciting, I feel like I bring it every time I get in there, and in a style that people like to see. I feel like I have the tools that argue with the point I’m trying to make.”

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Lorenz Larkin on free agency: ‘If fighters fight in the UFC just to say I’m a UFC fighter, that’s stupid’

Lorenz Larkin had one fight left in his deal with the UFC when he was offered a fight against Neil Magny at UFC 202 in August. The promotion reached out to him before the bout to try and re-sign him, but the California-native calls the offer a “slap in the face.” Three months have passed since his win, and he’s still yet to sign a new contract.

“I’m kind of disappointed when it comes to the whole side of the UFC because it’s such a long waiting period, especially when everything first happened, the way it came to me (about) re-signing a new deal before my Magny fight,” Larkin told Ariel Helwani on Monday’s edition of The MMA Hour. “I just thought the offer they threw at me was kind of a slap in the face and I didn’t want to agree to that.

“So we were like ‘ok, just fight your last fight of the contract,’ and I felt like that was a slap in the face because I kind of felt like they are betting against me, you know what I mean? It was just kind of like, ‘Magny is on a tear, he’s the beast and his accomplishments speak for itself,’ and I felt like the UFC was like ‘he’ll take this fight, he probably won’t get past Magny, and then we’ll re-sign him.’”

Larkin admits he felt “really good” proving the UFC wrong and knocking Magny out in the first round at UFC 202, but was surprised that the promotion hasn’t reached out to make any offer since the bout. Larkin says he knows there’s interest, but thought he would have signed a deal by now.

After being forced to sit for three months before testing free agency and getting offers from other promotions, Larkin says the whole situation involving free agency benefits the UFC.

“I try to look at everything from a fighter’s aspect and from a business aspect, and from a business’s aspect, I get it,” Larkin said of the three-month period before talking to other companies. “There are not too many guys that wanna wait three months and they just accept whatever is thrown at him. So that three months, I felt that those three months puts in you that mode that you don’t really wanna wait. You just kind of wanna get things settled and go with the flow, go with it. That three months thing is tailored towards them.”

“I know they are very interested,” he said of the UFC. “I think things since my fight have been really chaotic with the UFC, with everything that’s happened. I’m pretty sure I’ll know something within a week or so. I’m hoping for.”

Before joining the UFC in 2013, Larkin racked up an impressive 4-0 record with one no-contest as a middleweight and light heavyweight in Strikeforce, capped off by a win over Robbie Lawler, and reveled that his managers contacted former Strikeforce head Scott Coker, who now runs Bellator.

“My management spoke with Bellator and they are very interested in talking with me,” he said. “That’s a good thing. And I know RIZIN is interested, too. I feel like there’s interest there.”

With four fights in his past five bouts, including three knockout finishes, Larkin will go wherever the best offer is instead of just staying in the UFC regardless.

“If the promotion doesn’t believe in me, then what’s the point?” he says. “I’m kind of seasoned now. It’s not the thing I just want to be cool and tell people I fight in the UFC. That doesn’t do anything for me. Every fighter, they want a promotion to believe in them and believe they can do something and maybe put a little push behind you. I understand I won’t get pushed with everybody, but I feel like I have talent, I’m a fan-favorite to watch, I have an exciting style, I’m not boring in the cage, so my whole thing is, ‘use it.’

“I don’t wanna just fight. I’m not saying I wanna commentate or something like that, but use me, market me, just stuff like that. I’m under contract, put me to work. I’m not scared to work, you know? Any promotion, it doesn’t have anything to do with the name. If fighters fight in the UFC just to say I’m a UFC fighter, that’s stupid.”

Larkin says the plan is to sign a contract soon, and he’s confident he will get a good one.

“I think I’m gonna get what I’m happy with,” Larkin said. “I have all the tools for anything that makes sense. I feel like I’m exciting, I feel like I bring it every time I get in there, and in a style that people like to see. I feel like I have the tools that argue with the point I’m trying to make.”

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Ben Rothwell says accepting Junior dos Santos fight was ‘strategically stupid’

The road to the UFC title ended in Croatia for “Big” Ben Rothwell, who saw his four-fight win streak snapped at the hands of Junior dos Santos at UFC Fight Night 86. The loss sent Rothwell back to a crowded landscape of heavyweight contenders and spoiled a surprising run that appeared to have the 34-year-old on the verge of competing for a UFC strap.

“I didn’t fulfill everything that I said I was going to do,” a disappointed Rothwell said Monday on The MMA Hour, speaking for the first time since falling to dos Santos. “I didn’t back-up everything that I said. I said I’m a man of my word and I didn’t follow through with it, so that hurts me more than anything.”

Rothwell currently sits at No. 6 on the UFC heavyweight rankings, even despite the loss, so he knows all is not lost in the race towards gold. Still, he can’t help but wonder if he made the right decision.

The fight against dos Santos never made much sense from a rankings standpoint. At the time, Rothwell was one of the division’s hottest fighters, a winner of four straight and fresh off a submission win over the unsubmittable Josh Barnett. Dos Santos, on the other hand, was still reeling from a TKO loss to Alistair Overeem and saw his stock hit an all-time low.

Theoretically, the fight didn’t offer much to gain for “Big Ben” other than another notch onto his belt. But in his haste to stay active, Rothwell accepted it just days after dispatching Barnett.

“I was on a four-fight win streak and I took on a guy off a loss. It was a stupid fight for me, strategically,” Rothwell said.

“There some regret and there’s not. I think more, not regret, but a learning lesson. I think right after the fights, I need to be locked up and somebody else needs to take my phone and take my wallet, because I get crazy after a fight. It’s when I do crazy interviews, it’s when I’m off the wall, and I think I get high off the wins. I don’t know what it is, but it’s obvious I’m not thinking rationally at the time. It was good for the UFC because they got to fill a main event. It was just a strategically stupid fight.”

Despite coming in as an underdog, dos Santos ended up having his best showing in years as he swept Rothwell on the scorecards and won the striking battle by a whopping margin of 157-78.

Rothwell said on Monday that he felt off his game from the beginning of the fight. He called his uncharacteristic performance a “physical malfunction” and hinted that there were injuries which affected his camp. However he refused to delve into specifics or make excuses, chalking the loss up instead to a learning experience.

“I just look back at my friend Robbie Lawler. He made his resurgence, got to that title fight,” Rothwell said. “Mine wasn’t a title fight but I feel it could’ve been. He lost a five-round decision only to come back, and look what’s he done now. I feel like I’m very much just a heavyweight version of him. I’m following behind him. I learned a lot in this five-round fight.

“I might have taken a loss on my record, but I’m far from defeated. In fact, I’m very much the opposite. I think that fight gave me the fuel and the knowledge that I needed to really take myself to being the best mixed martial artist that I can be, and that’s my new goal. There’s no more about the title. I’m done chasing something I have no control over. I’m back to why I started this sport, and it’s to find out how good I can really be. With each and every fight from here on out, that’s my focus.”

Timing is everything in the fight game, and Rothwell now finds himself with a few options for his next step.

Alistair Overeem’s victory on Sunday over Andrei Arlovski kicked off a trio of major heavyweight fights that are slated to unfold over the next several months. If all goes well, UFC champion Fabricio Werdum will collide with Stipe Miocic later this week at UFC 198, then Cain Velasquez and Travis Browne will meet on July 9 at UFC 200.

Rothwell said he would love to fight one of those six contenders once the dust settles.

“That’s the three fights I’ve really been paying attention to, and I feel like my next opponent would be taking on one of those six guys. Most likely, one of the losers of those six guys,” Rothwell said.

“I’m more pushing for the loser of Stipe-Werdum or obviously Arlovski now. I’ll happily rematch Overeem but I don’t think he’s too interested in that right now, so obviously I’m going to be seeing what Arlovksi wants to do and if the UFC wants that, or obviously the loser of Stipe and Werdum would be an excellent fight as well. One of those, I’d really like to push for, because Browne and Velasquez are not until July, and then who knows.”

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