Tag Archive for striking’

Donald Cerrone Parts Ways With Striking Coach Brandon Gibson

Former Ultimate Fighting Championship lightweight title contender Donald Cerrone has parted ways with his striking coach, Brandon Gibson, in an effort to change things up going forward in his career.
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Iaquinta Shuts Down Dopey UFC Fans Who Snickered At Khabib’s Striking

Respect the Dagestani jab of doom!

Newly-crowned Ultimate Fighting Championship (UFC) lightweight champion, Khabib Nurmagomedov, received heavy criticism for his inability to finish Al Iaquinta in the UFC 223 pay-per-view (PPV) main event earlier this month in Brooklyn, New York.

But one person who won’t shit on “The Eagle” is “Raging Al,” who was outstruck 172-43 in their five-round championship headliner (highlights). In fact, Iaquinta praised Nurmagomedov for his awkward (but accurate) style that made him hard to hit.

From his conversation with MMA Fighting:

“His standup was really good. I felt like I was a step behind him, just from the first two rounds of trying to get up and stay against the cage, he was kind of wearing on me a little bit. So I felt a little behind, but his jab is good. Every time I tried to let so combos go, he’s awkward, he’s got like the Russians — it’s just a different style of boxing. They were saying he’s got his head up. I connect with everybody. … It was hard to get to him. He’s tough, he’s tough. He’s got his own style. He’s awkward. Maybe it doesn’t look like it from the outside, but, he’s definitely, he’s fucking tough man. I knew we had a mutual respect on the standup when it was going back and forth, he was definitely worried about my power shots. But he kept me away with his jab and his movement was a little awkward and good.”

The still-undefeated Nurmagomedov is best known for his unstoppable takedowns and punishing top game, but the Dagestani champion seemed content to bang it out on the feet against a legitimate knockout artist.

Granted, Iaquinta entered the bout on super short notice after both Tony Ferguson and Max Holloway were pulled from the UFC 223 fight card, but he was already scheduled to compete in “The Empire State” and was not coming in cold.

Is it time to give Nurmagomedov more credit for his striking prowess?

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UFC Fight Night 113 Results: Santiago Ponzinibbio Scoffs at Gunnar Nelson’s Striking, KO’s Him

Gunnar Nelson is pretty good at jiu-jitsu. Pretty damn good. You might say his entire MMA reputation hinges on how fearsome he is on the ground. And it’s served him well, to the tune of a 7-2 Octagon record, and a main event slot at today’s UFC Fight Night 113. His opponent, Santiago Ponzinibbio, hails […]

The post UFC Fight Night 113 Results: Santiago Ponzinibbio Scoffs at Gunnar Nelson’s Striking, KO’s Him appeared first on Caged Insider.

Caged Insider

Fallout: Alexander Gustafsson Is Redefining Striking At Light Heavyweight

Well, that was both beautiful and hard to watch wasn’t it. Alexander Gustafsson solidified his position as the third best light heavyweight in the world with an absolutely dominant performance over the tough Glover Teixeira at UFC Fight Night 109. It was bloody, it was brutal, and it was a true masterclass in striking. Watching the battle unfold before my eyes, I caught glimpses of pure brilliance from Alexander Gustafsson who lived up to his moniker as “The Mauler” as he showed off is fast hands en route to a knockout victory. There was boxing and kickboxing on full display with some shades of karate mixed in. But not everyone was a fan of Gustasfsson’s style.

Several different times the Swedish warrior would dodge heavy leather, duck out to the side, then sprint around the octagon and back to the center of the cage. Many people, including middleweight champion Michael Bisping and lightweight legend Gilbert Melendez, were outraged with Gustasfsson’s willingness to turn tail and run.

It’s totally understandable how this could be frowned upon, particularly when you consider that Gustafsson could have turned his sprinting into legitimate counter opportunities.

But you know what, I didn’t mind the tactic one bit and here’s why.

Alexander Gustafsson has been in a few wars already in the cage. Taking punishment shouldn’t be par for the course of being a warrior. Yes, perhaps he could have weaved, pivoted out and landed the same beautiful fight ending combination he showed off in the fifth round. But maybe he could have pivoted out and come face to face with a Teixeira left hook and see his title hopes vanish in an instant. The art of fighting isn’t about how much damage you can take and throw back (though that is a great Rocky quote). Nope. It’s about dishing out the punishment and avoiding punishment at all costs.

To some of you, simply saying that may sound like a cop out, but let’s really consider this for a moment. I’ve been punched in the face enough times to realize that staying in the pocket and brawling isn’t my cup of tea. No one goes into a fight just for the hell of it. You go in to win it and that means not getting your head knocked loose from your body. Alexander Gustafsson took the path of least resistance and at the end of the day secured a big win.

As for the actual fight itself, Alexander Gustafsson showed much improvement in his striking game. Not only did he land his jab on numerous occasion, he also seems to have become proficient in setting up elbow strikes as well.

Gustafsson also showed off a few karate based attacks with a spinning back kick, a blitz, and even fighting from both orthodox and southpaw stances.

By the end of the fight, Glover Teixeira had no clue what his opponent would do next, yet he valiantly hung in there. But despite his heart, we saw no real versatility from Teixeira. Barely any kicks, not enough feints, and a willingness to throw all his punches to the head rather than varying the levels of his attacks.

When all was said and done, it was Gustafsson’s uppercuts that won the day as he finished with a flurry. The work he was doing with his lead hand throughout the bout made it easy for him to gauge the range for his uppercuts of death followed by the overhand right of doom that closed the show.

While the haters and uninitiated will talk crap about Gustafsson and even this very article, “The Mauler” will be collecting checks and readying himself for another crack at the UFC light heavyweight belt. Let’s just appreciate the fact that Alexander Gustafsson figured out a way to beat the opposition without taking punishment in return and adding to his highlight reel. But though he may have had success getting away with the sprinting in this fight, it may not work against a man like Jon Jones you isn’t shy about throwing kicks.

Is Alexander Gustafsson the best striker at light heavyweight?


Jonathan Salmon is a writer, martial arts instructor, and geek culture enthusiast. Check out his Twitter and Facebook to keep up with his antics.

 

The post Fallout: Alexander Gustafsson Is Redefining Striking At Light Heavyweight appeared first on Cagepotato.

Cagepotato

Fallout: Alexander Gustafsson Is Redefining Striking At Light Heavyweight

Well, that was both beautiful and hard to watch wasn’t it. Alexander Gustafsson solidified his position as the third best light heavyweight in the world with an absolutely dominant performance over the tough Glover Teixeira at UFC Fight Night 109. It was bloody, it was brutal, and it was a true masterclass in striking. Watching the battle unfold before my eyes, I caught glimpses of pure brilliance from Alexander Gustafsson who lived up to his moniker as “The Mauler” as he showed off is fast hands en route to a knockout victory. There was boxing and kickboxing on full display with some shades of karate mixed in. But not everyone was a fan of Gustasfsson’s style.

Several different times the Swedish warrior would dodge heavy leather, duck out to the side, then sprint around the octagon and back to the center of the cage. Many people, including middleweight champion Michael Bisping and lightweight legend Gilbert Melendez, were outraged with Gustasfsson’s willingness to turn tail and run.

It’s totally understandable how this could be frowned upon, particularly when you consider that Gustafsson could have turned his sprinting into legitimate counter opportunities.

But you know what, I didn’t mind the tactic one bit and here’s why.

Alexander Gustafsson has been in a few wars already in the cage. Taking punishment shouldn’t be par for the course of being a warrior. Yes, perhaps he could have weaved, pivoted out and landed the same beautiful fight ending combination he showed off in the fifth round. But maybe he could have pivoted out and come face to face with a Teixeira left hook and see his title hopes vanish in an instant. The art of fighting isn’t about how much damage you can take and throw back (though that is a great Rocky quote). Nope. It’s about dishing out the punishment and avoiding punishment at all costs.

To some of you, simply saying that may sound like a cop out, but let’s really consider this for a moment. I’ve been punched in the face enough times to realize that staying in the pocket and brawling isn’t my cup of tea. No one goes into a fight just for the hell of it. You go in to win it and that means not getting your head knocked loose from your body. Alexander Gustafsson took the path of least resistance and at the end of the day secured a big win.

As for the actual fight itself, Alexander Gustafsson showed much improvement in his striking game. Not only did he land his jab on numerous occasion, he also seems to have become proficient in setting up elbow strikes as well.

Gustafsson also showed off a few karate based attacks with a spinning back kick, a blitz, and even fighting from both orthodox and southpaw stances.

By the end of the fight, Glover Teixeira had no clue what his opponent would do next, yet he valiantly hung in there. But despite his heart, we saw no real versatility from Teixeira. Barely any kicks, not enough feints, and a willingness to throw all his punches to the head rather than varying the levels of his attacks.

When all was said and done, it was Gustafsson’s uppercuts that won the day as he finished with a flurry. The work he was doing with his lead hand throughout the bout made it easy for him to gauge the range for his uppercuts of death followed by the overhand right of doom that closed the show.

While the haters and uninitiated will talk crap about Gustafsson and even this very article, “The Mauler” will be collecting checks and readying himself for another crack at the UFC light heavyweight belt. Let’s just appreciate the fact that Alexander Gustafsson figured out a way to beat the opposition without taking punishment in return and adding to his highlight reel. But though he may have had success getting away with the sprinting in this fight, it may not work against a man like Jon Jones you isn’t shy about throwing kicks.

Is Alexander Gustafsson the best striker at light heavyweight?


Jonathan Salmon is a writer, martial arts instructor, and geek culture enthusiast. Check out his Twitter and Facebook to keep up with his antics.

 

The post Fallout: Alexander Gustafsson Is Redefining Striking At Light Heavyweight appeared first on Cagepotato.

Cagepotato

Fallout: Alexander Gustafsson Is Redefining Striking At Light Heavyweight

Well, that was both beautiful and hard to watch wasn’t it. Alexander Gustafsson solidified his position as the third best light heavyweight in the world with an absolutely dominant performance over the tough Glover Teixeira at UFC Fight Night 109. It was bloody, it was brutal, and it was a true masterclass in striking. Watching the battle unfold before my eyes, I caught glimpses of pure brilliance from Alexander Gustafsson who lived up to his moniker as “The Mauler” as he showed off is fast hands en route to a knockout victory. There was boxing and kickboxing on full display with some shades of karate mixed in. But not everyone was a fan of Gustasfsson’s style.

Several different times the Swedish warrior would dodge heavy leather, duck out to the side, then sprint around the octagon and back to the center of the cage. Many people, including middleweight champion Michael Bisping and lightweight legend Gilbert Melendez, were outraged with Gustasfsson’s willingness to turn tail and run.

It’s totally understandable how this could be frowned upon, particularly when you consider that Gustafsson could have turned his sprinting into legitimate counter opportunities.

But you know what, I didn’t mind the tactic one bit and here’s why.

Alexander Gustafsson has been in a few wars already in the cage. Taking punishment shouldn’t be par for the course of being a warrior. Yes, perhaps he could have weaved, pivoted out and landed the same beautiful fight ending combination he showed off in the fifth round. But maybe he could have pivoted out and come face to face with a Teixeira left hook and see his title hopes vanish in an instant. The art of fighting isn’t about how much damage you can take and throw back (though that is a great Rocky quote). Nope. It’s about dishing out the punishment and avoiding punishment at all costs.

To some of you, simply saying that may sound like a cop out, but let’s really consider this for a moment. I’ve been punched in the face enough times to realize that staying in the pocket and brawling isn’t my cup of tea. No one goes into a fight just for the hell of it. You go in to win it and that means not getting your head knocked loose from your body. Alexander Gustafsson took the path of least resistance and at the end of the day secured a big win.

As for the actual fight itself, Alexander Gustafsson showed much improvement in his striking game. Not only did he land his jab on numerous occasion, he also seems to have become proficient in setting up elbow strikes as well.

Gustafsson also showed off a few karate based attacks with a spinning back kick, a blitz, and even fighting from both orthodox and southpaw stances.

By the end of the fight, Glover Teixeira had no clue what his opponent would do next, yet he valiantly hung in there. But despite his heart, we saw no real versatility from Teixeira. Barely any kicks, not enough feints, and a willingness to throw all his punches to the head rather than varying the levels of his attacks.

When all was said and done, it was Gustafsson’s uppercuts that won the day as he finished with a flurry. The work he was doing with his lead hand throughout the bout made it easy for him to gauge the range for his uppercuts of death followed by the overhand right of doom that closed the show.

While the haters and uninitiated will talk crap about Gustafsson and even this very article, “The Mauler” will be collecting checks and readying himself for another crack at the UFC light heavyweight belt. Let’s just appreciate the fact that Alexander Gustafsson figured out a way to beat the opposition without taking punishment in return and adding to his highlight reel. But though he may have had success getting away with the sprinting in this fight, it may not work against a man like Jon Jones you isn’t shy about throwing kicks.

Is Alexander Gustafsson the best striker at light heavyweight?


Jonathan Salmon is a writer, martial arts instructor, and geek culture enthusiast. Check out his Twitter and Facebook to keep up with his antics.

 

The post Fallout: Alexander Gustafsson Is Redefining Striking At Light Heavyweight appeared first on Cagepotato.

Cagepotato

Fallout: Alexander Gustafsson Is Redefining Striking At Light Heavyweight

Well, that was both beautiful and hard to watch wasn’t it. Alexander Gustafsson solidified his position as the third best light heavyweight in the world with an absolutely dominant performance over the tough Glover Teixeira at UFC Fight Night 109. It was bloody, it was brutal, and it was a true masterclass in striking. Watching the battle unfold before my eyes, I caught glimpses of pure brilliance from Alexander Gustafsson who lived up to his moniker as “The Mauler” as he showed off is fast hands en route to a knockout victory. There was boxing and kickboxing on full display with some shades of karate mixed in. But not everyone was a fan of Gustasfsson’s style.

Several different times the Swedish warrior would dodge heavy leather, duck out to the side, then sprint around the octagon and back to the center of the cage. Many people, including middleweight champion Michael Bisping and lightweight legend Gilbert Melendez, were outraged with Gustasfsson’s willingness to turn tail and run.

It’s totally understandable how this could be frowned upon, particularly when you consider that Gustafsson could have turned his sprinting into legitimate counter opportunities.

But you know what, I didn’t mind the tactic one bit and here’s why.

Alexander Gustafsson has been in a few wars already in the cage. Taking punishment shouldn’t be par for the course of being a warrior. Yes, perhaps he could have weaved, pivoted out and landed the same beautiful fight ending combination he showed off in the fifth round. But maybe he could have pivoted out and come face to face with a Teixeira left hook and see his title hopes vanish in an instant. The art of fighting isn’t about how much damage you can take and throw back (though that is a great Rocky quote). Nope. It’s about dishing out the punishment and avoiding punishment at all costs.

To some of you, simply saying that may sound like a cop out, but let’s really consider this for a moment. I’ve been punched in the face enough times to realize that staying in the pocket and brawling isn’t my cup of tea. No one goes into a fight just for the hell of it. You go in to win it and that means not getting your head knocked loose from your body. Alexander Gustafsson took the path of least resistance and at the end of the day secured a big win.

As for the actual fight itself, Alexander Gustafsson showed much improvement in his striking game. Not only did he land his jab on numerous occasion, he also seems to have become proficient in setting up elbow strikes as well.

Gustafsson also showed off a few karate based attacks with a spinning back kick, a blitz, and even fighting from both orthodox and southpaw stances.

By the end of the fight, Glover Teixeira had no clue what his opponent would do next, yet he valiantly hung in there. But despite his heart, we saw no real versatility from Teixeira. Barely any kicks, not enough feints, and a willingness to throw all his punches to the head rather than varying the levels of his attacks.

When all was said and done, it was Gustafsson’s uppercuts that won the day as he finished with a flurry. The work he was doing with his lead hand throughout the bout made it easy for him to gauge the range for his uppercuts of death followed by the overhand right of doom that closed the show.

While the haters and uninitiated will talk crap about Gustafsson and even this very article, “The Mauler” will be collecting checks and readying himself for another crack at the UFC light heavyweight belt. Let’s just appreciate the fact that Alexander Gustafsson figured out a way to beat the opposition without taking punishment in return and adding to his highlight reel. But though he may have had success getting away with the sprinting in this fight, it may not work against a man like Jon Jones you isn’t shy about throwing kicks.

Is Alexander Gustafsson the best striker at light heavyweight?


Jonathan Salmon is a writer, martial arts instructor, and geek culture enthusiast. Check out his Twitter and Facebook to keep up with his antics.

 

The post Fallout: Alexander Gustafsson Is Redefining Striking At Light Heavyweight appeared first on Cagepotato.

Cagepotato

Midnight Mania! Top MMA trainer claims Ronda Rousey’s striking not (completely) Edmond Tarverdyan’s fault

Bringing you the weird and wild from the world of MMA each and every night …

Welcome to Midnight Mania! Firas Zahabi, the head trainer at the successful mixed martial arts (MMA) gym, Tri-Star, has come out with some surprising comments in regard to Ronda Rousey’s boxing coach, Edmond Tarverdyan (who doesn’t care what you think). You can watch the clip below:

Here’s a partial transcript, courtesy of Bloody Elbow:

“I think Ronda has got power. What Ronda doesn’t have, is fluidity, a technical speed. She doesn’t have a smooth coordination. She’s very jittery, she’s very mechanical when she punches, and she’s very wild and telegraphs very much. Her punching level is not at an expert level,” he said. “However, is that her coach’s fault? I would say no, it is not.”

However, that was not all he had to say.

“The reason why a Ben Askren or a Ronda Rousey’s striking usually — not always — doesn’t hit that high level, is because they’ve spent so much time wiring their brain and their body and their nervous system to fight in one particular way. It’s opportunity cost. Every time you do one thing, you’re costing yourself in another.”

Even though he did place the blame partly on Rousey’s natural predilection to grappling, he did admit whatever Tarverdyan is doing is not working.

“Is it Edmond’s fault? I don’t think it is. But, I think there are coaches out there that can do a much better job than what Edmond did. That I will agree with. I don’t want to be negative towards anybody, but the job that he did out there against Amanda Nunes was as bad as it can be. That’s the legitimate criticism that I cannot defend. I don’t believe he’s incompetent. I think he’s a legitimate striker. I’ve seen his fight videos, I’ve seen him standing up. He legitimately knows what he’s doing standing up. Is his stand up style good for Ronda? Is his approach to training stand up good for Ronda? I would say it’s not.”

I can’t say I agree completely with Zahabi here, (Jeff Mayweather doesn’t) but it’s a balanced take. Tarverdyan may not have been a bad striker, but his coaching, in particular his cornering, is dreadful. Not entirely sure how you can defend this, though.


Fan Made

Mike Goldberg is feeling the love now that he has retired.

I can appreciate a man who can poke fun at himself. Anderson Silva’s Precision is Precise — that is irrefutable logic!

Here’s the Tommy Toehold video he referenced:

Who did this???

Nice artwork!


Slips, Rips and Clips

Watch the following true story and tell me if you think that’s dirty or fair.

It’s not the fastest knockout ever:

But, it is why “No Love” doesn’t do the glove touch:

That’s MMA though: Cheating often pays off. Not always, though. Sometimes you try to throw right off the glove touch and it backfires.

“Korean Zombie” will be back in action Feb. 4, 2017, at Toyota Center in Houston, Texas … and I’m still hoping to snag some tickets for that one.

Two Hellbow knockouts in a row!

Crank that kimura!

Edson Barboza vs. Paul Felder was an awesome back-and-forth battle.

New view on that Moat Fight knockout from the other day:

Who are these fighters and when did this happen? I don’t remember this and I should.

Hipsters are out here embarrassing my city.


‘Roos and Stick Fighting

Remember that guy who squared up to the kangaroo?

Well, the kangaroo found him.

Boxing kangaroos is actually a tradition that goes back more than 100 years. Here’s what it looks like:

Some are scarier than others:

Jacks Slack even did a breakdown on the fighting style of ‘roos.

This 1950s French documentary of the old Filipino fighting art of Arnis is really fascinating. The stick-fighting action starts in the latter half of the video.

This is what the sport looks like now:

That looks incredibly fun.


Quick Hits


Random Land

I had never seen Uncle Rob’s how to videos before, but I found them extremely helpful.

Dr. Patrick Wyman is putting his history Ph.D. to good use in this new podcast:

Stay woke, Maniacs!

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What striking? UFC ‘Breakdown’ goes ‘On the Mat’ for ‘Mousasi vs Hall 2’ in Belfast

I think it’s safe to say most mixed martial arts (MMA) fans are expecting the Gegard Mousasi vs. Uriah Hall rematch, which takes place this Saturday (Nov. 19, 2016) inside SSE Arena in Belfast, Northern Ireland, to play out on the feet.

It did last time, and ended poorly for “The Dreamcatcher.”

But even though both Mousasi and Hall are talented strikers, this is still an MMA fight, which means wrestling and jiu-jitsu are always in play. It’s not uncommon for a fighter to get rocked and resort to panic wrestling.

To disastrous results.

But if and when the UFC Belfast headliner, scheduled for five rounds on UFC Fight Pass, hits the ground for some grappling, UFC analyst and former welterweight contender Dan Hardy shows you what to expect in this latest edition of UFC Breakdown: “On the Mat.”

For a closer look at the Mousasi vs. Hall rematch click here. To see who else is fighting at UFC Fight Night 99 click here.

MMAmania.com – All Posts

What striking? UFC ‘Breakdown’ goes ‘On the Mat’ for ‘Mousasi vs Hall 2’ in Belfast

I think it’s safe to say most mixed martial arts (MMA) fans are expecting the Gegard Mousasi vs. Uriah Hall rematch, which takes place this Saturday (Nov. 19, 2016) inside SSE Arena in Belfast, Northern Ireland, to play out on the feet.

It did last time, and ended poorly for “The Dreamcatcher.”

But even though both Mousasi and Hall are talented strikers, this is still an MMA fight, which means wrestling and jiu-jitsu are always in play. It’s not uncommon for a fighter to get rocked and resort to panic wrestling.

To disastrous results.

But if and when the UFC Belfast headliner, scheduled for five rounds on UFC Fight Pass, hits the ground for some grappling, UFC analyst and former welterweight contender Dan Hardy shows you what to expect in this latest edition of UFC Breakdown: “On the Mat.”

For a closer look at the Mousasi vs. Hall rematch click here. To see who else is fighting at UFC Fight Night 99 click here.

MMAmania.com – All Posts