Tag Archive for Sergio

UFC Fight Night 125 Results: Tim Means and Sergio Moraes Slug It Out

Sergio Moraes earned a modicum of fan recognition by winning a few fights on a season of TUF Brasil, which makes him somewhat valuable to the UFC whenever they do a show in Brazil.

Tim Means is just a dude who’s always willing to throw down. That makes him valuable, too.

Neither man will ever challenge for a belt, but putting them together on a card in Brazil is a “can’t miss” match-up that promises violence. And hey, that’s what we got!

Whatever ground game Moraes hoped to impose on the American, it went out the window once Means started stuffing takedown attempts. Which was fine, because Moraes has wild hooks full of power to rely on when it comes to the stand-up game, and Means loves eating hooks for some reason.

That was the story of Round 1 – other than pulling guard once, Moraes was unable to get the fight to the ground, and Means ate hooks like they were food. Round 2 saw Means make adjustments and nail the Brazilian with more kicks and punches than he ate.

Moraes was very much running out of steam in the third, and even flopped to guard, hoping that Means would join him for some odd reason. Time expired with the duo slugging it out, and since this fight took place in Brazil…

 

Results: Sergio Moraes def. Tim Means via Split Decision

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UFC 218 results from last night: Henry Cejudo vs Sergio Pettis fight recap

Ultimate Fighting Championship (UFC) Flyweight contenders Henry Cejudo and Sergio Pettis squared off last night (Dec. 2, 2017) at UFC 218 inside the Little Caesars Arena in Detroit, Michigan.

Cejudo’s striking in his last pair of bouts changed the scene even if one of them was a loss. Previous to those fights, Cejudo was a long ways off from a rematch with “Mighty Mouse,” but his improvements were so dramatic that Cejudo already was back in a title eliminator match up.

On the other hand, Pettis has developed into a surprisingly sound title contender. He was still a bit raw when the UFC first picked him up — understandable given his age — but “SP” came into this clash with four-straight wins and a fair bit of momentum behind him.

Both men worked from wide stances, but Pettis operated as a Southpaw. Early on, Pettis was exceptionally sharp, as he fired crisp jabs, long kicks, and landed a counter left early. Cejudo took note as well, dropping down into a double leg and spinning his opponent to the mat.

Once on top, Cejudo showed his world class wrestling. Pettis tried to turtle and stand, but Cejudo repeatedly sat him back to his hip or spun to the front head lock. It was really a masterclass in top control, as he allowed Pettis to build up a bit before snapping him back down.

The Olympian didn’t do a ton of damage until the final 10 seconds, but he clearly captured the first round.

Listening to his coach’s corner advice, Pettis fired more kicks at the start of the second. They landed heavily, and Pettis continued to look sharp, jabbing and stuffing his foe’s first takedown attempt.

Unfortunately, a slip sent Pettis to the mat, and Cejudo jumped on him. This time, Pettis did a better job of maintaining guard in search of a stand up. It didn’t happen, but Pettis was able to get back to his feet with 45 seconds remaining.

He wasn’t able to get much going before the end of the round, meaning Cejudo was most likely up 2-0 with five minutes remaining.

Pettis stood his ground in the pocket in search of a big shot, and both men landed as a result. The straights of “SP” were landing best, but a single leg from the Olympian planted Pettis on his back once more.

Pettis was trapped in turtle and guard for the third time, this time able to stand up with 70 seconds remaining for Pettis to score a finish. The kickboxer slowly advanced and intently looked for opportunities, but Cejudo kept his guard high and feinted for takedowns.

Pettis didn’t find his moment, and Cejudo was awarded the decision.

There’s not too much to analyze from Cejudo. Whenever he got deep on a shot, he sent his opponent to the mat. Once there, Cejudo’s control was excellent, as he made Pettis carry his weight and stole his energy.

I don’t know how much it says about his ability to rematch Demetrious Johnson successfully, but a 30-27 win over a top contender is still a big deal.

For Sergio Pettis, this critique is going to sound pretty rude, as it’s really the ultimate case of “easier said than done.” Pettis’ biggest issue was an inability to get up from takedowns quickly, and a partial reason for that was Pettis attempt to stand/scramble from the turtle without fighting hands first. Against a good wrestler — a description very safely applied to Cejudo — it’s absolutely imperative to break the grip and control a hand before attempting to get up.

Otherwise, you’ll be yanked, snapped, and slammed backed to the ground unceremoniously.

For the first minute of every round, Pettis’ kickboxing was nasty. He was the sharper man who made the most of his range, but he just couldn’t keep it on the feet long enough for that to matter.

Last night, Henry Cejudo reverted to his wrestling roots to dominate his opponent. How do you like Cejudo’s chances in a rematch opposite the Flyweight kingpin?

For complete UFC 218: “Holloway vs. Aldo 2” results and play-by-play, click HERE!

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UFC Fight Night 114 Results: Sergio Pettis Finally Lives Up to His Potential

It’s time for the main event of UFC Fight Night 114, which means Sergio Pettis has the spotlight shining brightly on him and there’s no room for the shadow of his older, much more accomplished brother Anthony to intrude. That’s the theory, at least. In reality, we’ve always gazed upon Sergio through a lens filtered […]

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Sergio Pettis vs. Brandon Moreno full fight video highlights – UFC Fight Night 114

It was quite the performance for Sergio Pettis last night (Sat., Aug. 5, 2017) at UFC Fight Night 114 live on FOX Sports 1 from inside Arena Ciudad de México in Mexico City, Mexico, when he tactically took out rising contender Brandon Moreno to the tune of a five-round unanimous decision.

It was all Moreno in the early going. After coming out in what can only be called a drunken monkey stance, the 23-year-old Mexican took Pettis down, locked in a nasty body triangle and scored ground-and-pound in bunches. Pettis started to open up a little more in Round 2, landing a few hard head kicks and nearly locking in a triangle choke.

Moreno kept abandoning his ground game in favor of striking with Pettis, who utilized his technicality to outpoint “Baby Assassin.” Pettis whipped Moreno with more head kicks, hard right hands, lead jabs, and counter kicks. The damage took a toll as a cut opened up above Moreno’s right eye. The action temporarily stopped when Pettis inadvertently poked Moreno in the eye early into the fourth. When the fight resumed Moreno became on a little more aggressively by moving inside of the pocket and slinging swooping leather. Moreno was able to land one of his best punches of the fight, but Pettis ate it and remained patient.

Moreno opened up the fifth and final frame with a clean takedown. He didn’t do much damage as Pettis defended nicely, but did earn some much needed top time. That was until Pettis flung him off to bring the action back to the feet. Moreno tried to pour it on late, but it was simply too late. Pettis had done enough already to earn the unanimous decision victory.

Check out the full fight video highlights above courtesy of UFC.

With this win, Pettis has done enough to lock down a UFC flyweight title shot his next time out. He has won four-straight fights and is on the short list of available title contenders who have never faced current champion Demetrious Johnson. At 23 years of age, Pettis is far from a complete fighter, but has shown a higher level of maturity inside of the cage over his past few fights.

For complete UFC Fight Night 114 results and coverage click here.

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UFC Fight Night 114: Sergio Pettis, ‘Fighter To Watch’ tonight in Mexico City

The time has come once again for Sergio Pettis to attempt his long-awaited breakout under the brights lights of the Octagon. After a few missed opportunities in the past, Pettis will get his chance to headline an event later tonight (Sat., Aug. 5, 2017) at UFC Fight Night 114 live on FOX Sports 1 from inside Arena Ciudad de México in Mexico City, Mexico, when he takes on surging flyweight contender Brandon Moreno.

This is not only a huge fight for “The Phenom” as he looks to burst out from behind the shadow of brother Anthony Pettis, but it’s an incredible matchup in a 125-pound division dying for fresh title challengers. Whoever is able to escape UFC Fight Night 114 later this evening will more than likely lock down the chance to fight UFC flyweight champion Demetrious Johnson, assuming “Mighty Mouse” is able to get past Ray Borg at UFC 215 on Sept. 9.

Pettis, 23, was one of the most highly-touted prospects in mixed martial arts (MMA) when he made his UFC debut back in 2013. Anthony had given the Pettis family its name in the sport and Sergio was going to take full advantage of that popularity. Unfortunately, “The Phenom” wasn’t able to push his way towards contention with a submission loss to Alex Caceres at bantamweight in 2014 and a knockout loss to Ryan Benoit at flyweight in 2015.

Now that Pettis has won three in a row he’s hoping to become the “new face” of the vastly depleted flyweight division. With youth on his side and an apparent evolution of skill fueling his recent success, Pettis could jump into title contention for the first time with a win over Moreno in Mexico City. If he’s unable to get past “Assassin Baby,” Pettis will be forced back down the flyweight ladder and have his overall potential questioned yet again heading into 2018.

It’s a hell of a lot to think about, especially considering Pettis is competing in his first UFC main event. But if the Duke Roufus protege wants to take the next step towards fighting the pound-for-pound best fighter on the planet he’s going to have to come out victorious in moments like these.

MMAmania.com will deliver LIVE round-by-round, blow-by-blow coverage of the entire UFC Fight Night 114 fight card, starting with the Fight Pass “Prelims” matches online, which are scheduled to begin at 7 p.m. ET, and then the remaining undercard balance on FOX Sports 1 at 8 p.m. ET, before the main card start time at 10 p.m. ET on FOX Sports 1.

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UFC Mexico preview: Sergio Pettis ready to become more than just ‘Showtime’s’ little brother

Ultimate Fighting Championship (UFC) is back on television this weekend (Sat., Aug. 5, 2017) with the UFC Fight Night 114 mixed martial arts (MMA) event on FOX Sports 1, which features a flyweight main event between Sergio Pettis and Brandon Moreno, who battle for a spot in the 125-pound title chase.

See the entire fight card and line up here.

Pettis (15-2) entered the promotion with a ton of hype, thanks to his older brother and former UFC lightweight champion Anthony Pettis. Unfortunately, not everything went according to plan and Sergio got submitted in his sophomore effort.

Since then, “The Phenom” is 5-1 and coming off three straight wins, and finally able to step out from the shadow of his veteran brother.

“I feel like I’m growing into myself, I’m maturing as an individual and as a martial artist,” Pettis told UFC Tonight. “I’m feeling comfortable out there in the Octagon. In the beginning of my career, I was very timid out there. I feel like I’m expressing myself and having a great time doing it.”

Pettis was last seen turning away former division No. 1 contender John Moraga.

Waiting for him will be the red-hot Moreno (14-3), undefeated inside the Octagon and the winner of 11 straight with eight finishes. No question the winner will move themselves one step close to a division title shot.

But will it be Pettis … or Moreno?

MMAmania.com will deliver LIVE round-by-round, blow-by-blow coverage of the entire UFC Fight Night 114 fight card on fight night (click here), starting with the Fight Pass “Prelims” matches online, which are scheduled to begin at 7 p.m. ET, and then the remaining undercard balance on FOX Sports 1 at 8 p.m. ET, before the main card start time at 10 p.m. ET on FOX Sports 1.

For much more on UFC Fight Night 114 in Mexico City click here.

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Sergio Pettis vs. Brandon Moreno to headline UFC Fight Night 114

A flyweight bout pitting up-and-coming contenders Sergio Pettis and Brandon Moreno against one another has been slotted to headline UFC Fight Night 114 on Aug. 5 in Mexico City, Mexico. The UFC announced the bout Sunday on its Spanish portal.

Pettis (15-2) is coming off a disappointing week at UFC 211, where his expected contest against one-time title challenger Henry Cejudo was canceled the week of the event due to a Cejudo hand injury.

Pettis, 23, has won three consecutive contests and is 6-2 overall in the UFC. His latest run includes a pair of decision wins over past flyweight title challengers Chris Cariaso and John Moraga. He is currently the No. 6 ranked flyweight on the UFC’s official media-generated rankings.

Moreno (14-3), meanwhile, has proven to be a revelation in the UFC since his failed run on The Ultimate Fighter 24.

A 23-year-old native of Mexico, Moreno entered TUF 24 as the No. 16 ranked fighter out of 16 and promptly lost a close decision to top-seeded Alexandre Pantoja. Nonetheless, he went on to rip off a trio of electric victories inside the Octagon, defeating Louis Smolka, Ryan Benoit, and Dustin Ortiz to prove himself as a worthy contender in the 125-pound division. “The Assassin Baby” is currently the No. 7 ranked flyweight on the UFC’s flyweight rankings.

UFC Fight Night 114 takes place at the Arena Ciudad de Mexico.

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UFC 211: Will Henry Cejudo Shutdown The Young And Hungry Sergio Pettis

The main card of UFC 211 features two top level flyweights, each of whom could be considered for a title challenge with a few more good wins. While Henry Cejudo may have already had his crack at glory, Sergio Pettis is looking to throw his card into the Demetrious Johnson sweepstakes (a prize that I’m not sure anyone truly wants to win at this point). This fight has a lot riding on it for both fighters and it’s good to see it opening up the main card for one of the more stacked events of the year (good job UFC, keep this up and people may end up caring about flyweight).

Henry Cejudo has the tools to give anyone at 125 lbs tons of issues. His mix of gritty, powerful and technical wrestling has matched well with his kickboxing style. Cejudo showed in his bout with Joseph Benavidez that he has the ability to go three hard rounds against a tactical and fast paced opponent. His kicking game was also very impressive. The biggest flaw in that fight however was how much power he threw into every shot. If he learns to fight at a more measured pace, picking his shots, flashing the jab to control distance, and level changes when Pettis over commits, we could see Cejudo put on a dominant performance.

The plan of attack for Cejudo should be fairly straight forward. Takedowns will play a major role, as will controlling the clinch and landing heavy punches on the break. Cejudo is likely to have a strength advantage here and he needs to let Pettis understand that as soon as the first bell rings. Cejudo fell in love with his power a bit in his bout with Joseph Benavidez and he’ll want to avoid that here. Basic boxing combinations like the double jab cross will be effective in this fight. He’ll need to stay in Pettis’ face and stay busy the whole time in order prevent the younger man from trying to control the distance. Pettis wants distance which means Cejudo needs to make him feel claustrophobic and fight in a phone booth. Ending combinations with either a left hook or right round kick will do Cejudo a ton of good.

Sergio Pettis may not have the flash and flare of his older brother, but he does indeed have a more complete game. The younger Pettis looks to mix up his attack with sharp striking coupled with some nicely timed level changes. Rather than just focus purely on knocking opponents out, Pettis likes to employ a game that keeps his opposition guessing. He’s as likely to fire off a blistering head kick as he is to shoot for a takedown.

The goal for Pettis here is to frustrate Cejudo and get his distance with kicks immediately before the Olympic wrestler can get comfortable. While kicking against a wrestler can be ill advised, if you get the distance just right it can keep the shorter Cejudo on the outside. The benefit of Sergio Pettis being from a traditional martial arts background means that he has the ability to throw strikes from both stances. It will allow him to confuse Cejudo and, once his opponent is bewildered, land a devastating rear round kick or cross from the southpaw stance.

Most important for Pettis is to ensure his feet keep moving. The younger Pettis has a tendency to stand still at times which can get him into all kinds of trouble with a power puncher and wrestler of Cejudo’s caliber.

Which flyweight will take one step closer to punching their ticket for the Demetrious Johnson horror show?


Jonathan Salmon is a writer, martial arts instructor, and geek culture enthusiast. Check out his Twitter and Facebook to keep up with his antics.

The post UFC 211: Will Henry Cejudo Shutdown The Young And Hungry Sergio Pettis appeared first on Cagepotato.

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UFC 211: Will Henry Cejudo Shutdown The Young And Hungry Sergio Pettis

The main card of UFC 211 features two top level flyweights, each of whom could be considered for a title challenge with a few more good wins. While Henry Cejudo may have already had his crack at glory, Sergio Pettis is looking to throw his card into the Demetrious Johnson sweepstakes (a prize that I’m not sure anyone truly wants to win at this point). This fight has a lot riding on it for both fighters and it’s good to see it opening up the main card for one of the more stacked events of the year (good job UFC, keep this up and people may end up caring about flyweight).

Henry Cejudo has the tools to give anyone at 125 lbs tons of issues. His mix of gritty, powerful and technical wrestling has matched well with his kickboxing style. Cejudo showed in his bout with Joseph Benavidez that he has the ability to go three hard rounds against a tactical and fast paced opponent. His kicking game was also very impressive. The biggest flaw in that fight however was how much power he threw into every shot. If he learns to fight at a more measured pace, picking his shots, flashing the jab to control distance, and level changes when Pettis over commits, we could see Cejudo put on a dominant performance.

The plan of attack for Cejudo should be fairly straight forward. Takedowns will play a major role, as will controlling the clinch and landing heavy punches on the break. Cejudo is likely to have a strength advantage here and he needs to let Pettis understand that as soon as the first bell rings. Cejudo fell in love with his power a bit in his bout with Joseph Benavidez and he’ll want to avoid that here. Basic boxing combinations like the double jab cross will be effective in this fight. He’ll need to stay in Pettis’ face and stay busy the whole time in order prevent the younger man from trying to control the distance. Pettis wants distance which means Cejudo needs to make him feel claustrophobic and fight in a phone booth. Ending combinations with either a left hook or right round kick will do Cejudo a ton of good.

Sergio Pettis may not have the flash and flare of his older brother, but he does indeed have a more complete game. The younger Pettis looks to mix up his attack with sharp striking coupled with some nicely timed level changes. Rather than just focus purely on knocking opponents out, Pettis likes to employ a game that keeps his opposition guessing. He’s as likely to fire off a blistering head kick as he is to shoot for a takedown.

The goal for Pettis here is to frustrate Cejudo and get his distance with kicks immediately before the Olympic wrestler can get comfortable. While kicking against a wrestler can be ill advised, if you get the distance just right it can keep the shorter Cejudo on the outside. The benefit of Sergio Pettis being from a traditional martial arts background means that he has the ability to throw strikes from both stances. It will allow him to confuse Cejudo and, once his opponent is bewildered, land a devastating rear round kick or cross from the southpaw stance.

Most important for Pettis is to ensure his feet keep moving. The younger Pettis has a tendency to stand still at times which can get him into all kinds of trouble with a power puncher and wrestler of Cejudo’s caliber.

Which flyweight will take one step closer to punching their ticket for the Demetrious Johnson horror show?


Jonathan Salmon is a writer, martial arts instructor, and geek culture enthusiast. Check out his Twitter and Facebook to keep up with his antics.

The post UFC 211: Will Henry Cejudo Shutdown The Young And Hungry Sergio Pettis appeared first on Cagepotato.

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Davi Ramos: Fight with Sergio Moraes is the greatest grappling match-up in UFC history

FORTALEZA, Brazil — Davi Ramos will make his UFC debut Saturday night against Sergio Moraes, and he believes that his fight will make history.

Ramos, who originally fights in the lightweight division, is a multiple time champion in jiu-jitsu and the 2015 ADCC gold medalist. Ramos is moving up to 170 pounds to replace injured Max Griffin on short notice at UFC Fight Night 106, and welcomes a grappling contest with his fellow BJJ world champion.

“This time it’s two guys with excellent jiu-jitsu, so I believe this will be a great jiu-jitsu show for everyone, which I think is cool,” Ramos said. “We usually face different styles in MMA fights, so facing someone with a style similar as yours will be really cool.”

In fact, based on their credentials in pure jiu-jitsu and grappling competition, Ramos believes that his fight in Fortaleza is the greatest match-up between grapplers in the history of the UFC.

“No doubt about it,” Ramos said. “I haven’t seen two jiu-jitsu world champions competing (against each other) in the UFC. I believe it will be an excellent fight.”

Ramos has competed more often in jiu-jitsu than Moraes, who signed with the UFC after competing at the first edition of The Ultimate Fighter in Brazil, and believes that’s the reason why his jiu-jitsu skills are better.

“I see this fight ending with me submitting him in any way,” Ramos said. “That’s my style. I don’t have a pre-determined style. I can finish with heel hooks, armbars, neck chokes. I’m an athlete with a lot of options, and that’s what I’m looking for.”

“’Serginho’ is a fantastic fighter, he had a great career in jiu-jitsu and is doing his career in MMA now,” he continued. “I definitely see myself better than him everywhere, in jiu-jitsu and standing.”

The UFC newcomer plans on cutting down to 155 pounds after UFC Fight Night 106, and won’t stop competing in jiu-jitsu tournaments.

“That’s the biggest mistake jiu-jitsu athletes make, in my opinion, because they stop competing in jiu-jitsu,” Ramos said. “I don’t plan on leaving jiu-jitsu, especially because I want to keep my jiu-jitsu better than everyone’s in the UFC.”

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