Tag Archive for Returning

Joanna Jedrzejczyk Plans on Earning ‘GOAT’ Status at UFC 231, Returning to Strawweight in 2019

Joanna Jedrzejczyk plans on leaving UFC 231 as flyweight champion, a victory that in her mind will cement her status as the top female fighter in mixed martial arts history.
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Anthony Johnson Interested In Returning to UFC at Heavyweight, Fighting Jon Jones

Fans were left stunned and disappointed last April when former two-time Ultimate Fighting Championship light heavyweight title contender Anthony Johnson announced his retirement from the sport after a second loss to 205-pound champion Daniel Cormier.
Recent News on Sherdog.com

Anthony Johnson Interested In Returning to UFC at Heavyweight, Fighting Jon Jones

Fans were left stunned and disappointed last April when former two-time Ultimate Fighting Championship light heavyweight title contender Anthony Johnson announced his retirement from the sport after a second loss to 205-pound champion Daniel Cormier.
Recent News on Sherdog.com

Is ‘The Sugar Show’ Returning At UFC 229?

Could ‘The Sugar Show’ be the fight that comes right before McGregor vs. Khabib?

The Sugar Show may be returning in October.

That’s according to “Sugar” Sean O’Malley himself, who claimed he was getting the co-main event slot at UFC 229 in October.

”CO MAIN EVENT October 6th in Las Vegas,” the 23 year old prospect wrote on Instagram, alongside video of him knocking out a victim with a spinning hook kick. No potential opponent was named.

CO MAIN EVENT October 6th in Las Vegas . #sugarshow repost: @videofolder

A post shared by Sugar Sean O’Malley (@sugaseanmma) on

O’Malley has been out of action since a March 2018 win over Andre Soukhamthath where he badly injured the ligaments in his foot.

“What I understand is it would be better if it was broken because it would be easier to heal than ligament tears,” O’Malley told the MMA Hour back in March. “I think I would almost rather it would be broken, but we’re going to check it out and we’ll see where we can go from there.”

A co-main event placement on any pay-per-view card would be pretty big for O’Malley, but UFC 229 on October 6th could be a career changer: that’s the date the UFC is rumored to be targeting for the massive Conor McGregor vs. Khabib Nurmagomedov lightweight title fight.

The UFC has been pushing O’Malley hard as a future star since the bantamweight arrived in the organization via Dana White’s Tuesday Night Contender Series a year ago, and he’s rewarded them with gutsy and entertaining wins. A spot just before McGregor vs. Nurmagomedov could help propel O’Malley to proper stardom. At the very least, it guarantees we’ll see a barnburner of a fight leading into the big main event.

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Chuck Liddell Confirms He’s Returning To MMA, Tito Ortiz Responds

The post Chuck Liddell Confirms He’s Returning To MMA, Tito Ortiz Responds appeared first on Fightline.

Just when you thought MMA couldn’t get any stranger than it already is.

Former UFC champions Chuck Liddell and Tito Ortiz are one step closer to fighting each other again.

Liddell confirmed on The MMA Hour Monday that he is returning to the sport, as he targets a third bout vs. Ortiz with promoter Oscar de la Hoya.

“I will fight again,” Liddell said. “It’s a real thing. They’re working on it.

Early plans are for November in either Las Vegas or California under the Golden Boy Promotions banner. De La Hoya, a former boxing champion, recently mentioned the idea of getting into the MMA business.

While Ortiz has previously stated he would only return for Liddell, the same is not true for “The Iceman.”

“I miss it. I never stopped missing it. And I kinda hadn’t really thought about it much,” Liddell said (thanks to MMA Fighting for the quotes). “And then when he brought it up and we started getting going, and I started training and I started doing stuff again, getting ready to try to take this on, it made me go, ‘You know what, what if he pulls out? Am I not going to fight? Am I going to do all of this and not fight?’ Oh no, we had to have somebody backing up, and if it doesn’t work out with him, I’m (still) going to give it a shot. It’ll be somebody else, one of the guys from my past probably, most likely, and we’ll see where I’m at.”

Liddell, 48 years old, will have been gone from the sport for eight years this June. He was knocked out by Rich Franklin that year at UFC 115, his third consecutive knockout loss.

Ortiz, who turned 43 years old this year and is 0-2 vs. Liddell lifetime, fought in 2017, besting Chael Sonnen via submission for his first win in three years.

 

 

The post Chuck Liddell Confirms He’s Returning To MMA, Tito Ortiz Responds appeared first on Caged Insider.

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Chuck Liddell Confirms He’s Returning To MMA, Tito Ortiz Responds

The post Chuck Liddell Confirms He’s Returning To MMA, Tito Ortiz Responds appeared first on Fightline.

Just when you thought MMA couldn’t get any stranger than it already is.

Former UFC champions Chuck Liddell and Tito Ortiz are one step closer to fighting each other again.

Liddell confirmed on The MMA Hour Monday that he is returning to the sport, as he targets a third bout vs. Ortiz with promoter Oscar de la Hoya.

“I will fight again,” Liddell said. “It’s a real thing. They’re working on it.

Early plans are for November in either Las Vegas or California under the Golden Boy Promotions banner. De La Hoya, a former boxing champion, recently mentioned the idea of getting into the MMA business.

While Ortiz has previously stated he would only return for Liddell, the same is not true for “The Iceman.”

“I miss it. I never stopped missing it. And I kinda hadn’t really thought about it much,” Liddell said (thanks to MMA Fighting for the quotes). “And then when he brought it up and we started getting going, and I started training and I started doing stuff again, getting ready to try to take this on, it made me go, ‘You know what, what if he pulls out? Am I not going to fight? Am I going to do all of this and not fight?’ Oh no, we had to have somebody backing up, and if it doesn’t work out with him, I’m (still) going to give it a shot. It’ll be somebody else, one of the guys from my past probably, most likely, and we’ll see where I’m at.”

Liddell, 48 years old, will have been gone from the sport for eight years this June. He was knocked out by Rich Franklin that year at UFC 115, his third consecutive knockout loss.

Ortiz, who turned 43 years old this year and is 0-2 vs. Liddell lifetime, fought in 2017, besting Chael Sonnen via submission for his first win in three years.

 

 

The post Chuck Liddell Confirms He’s Returning To MMA, Tito Ortiz Responds appeared first on Caged Insider.

Caged Insider

Dana White Not Banking on Conor McGregor Ever Returning

Probably the toughest thing about creating a pay-per-view monster is luring back into action after you’ve made it rich. That seems to be the case with UFC – and boxing – star Conor McGregor, who made so much money trading leather with Floyd Mayweather that he could buy a handful of towns and villages in […]

The post Dana White Not Banking on Conor McGregor Ever Returning appeared first on Caged Insider.

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Midnight Mania! One-armed fighter Nick “Notorious” Newell returning to MMA after two year retirement

Bringing you the weird and wild from the world of MMA each and every weeknight

Welcome to Midnight Mania!

Nick Newell, the one-armed fighter who once faced Justin Gaethje, is returning to MMA. Via CombatDocket.com:

Ex WSOF title challenger, and XFC Lightweight Champion Nick Newell has ended a two plus year layoff to sign a multi fight deal with LFA. Newell, a congenital amputee from the elbow down on his left arm has been fighting against the odds his whole life.

Nick was widely considered an inspirational figure, not just to the MMA community but to a wide swath of people who found his success in spite of his amputation astonishing.

He never took that view of himself.

Here are extended highlights from his only loss to Justin Gaethje prior to retirement. Besides being more competitive than I recalled, there is also a clearly illegal knee by Gaethje; Newell complained about it afterwards, and it was never addressed by the referee. Considering the mettle Justin Gaethje has since shown against top ten UFC competition, this fight is extremely impressive in retrospect.

Before that, he became XFC champion with this fight:

He’s also known for posting videos of his cats.

When is life #GatosDeNewell #catsofinstagram #instacat #catstgram #catbreading #cats

A post shared by Nick Newell (@notoriousnewell) on


Insomnia

We’ve all been there, Cat.

Waxing lyrical for no reason is okay

Easy Peasy Lemon Squeazy

Some days I do love the internet.

(this was the original image)

I’ll admit I chuckled

Will Brooks and Dustin Poirier in the ATT training room


Slips, Rips, and KO Clips

Slip, rip, KO, all in this clip.

This is my favorite counter

I did enjoy this fight

The Basho is back, and that means Sumo for all you poor souls

This is going to be an awesome boxing match. I cannot wait.

Beautiful body kick.

One thing you have to admit about Mike Perry- he can certainly fight.

That’s the lowest lift I’ve ever seen from a knockout knee to the head.

This 2011 footage of Floyd Mayweather Sr., against a kid that decides sucker-punching him is a good idea, is truly wild.


Good Reads and Quick Hits


Podcasts and Video

The MMA Hour

Flyin Brian J explains why Conor McGregor is being sued

The Severe MMA lads discuss the latest craic

The CME podcast


Random Land

… what?

I hope Floridians are okay…

Stay woke, Maniacs! Follow me on Facebook and Twitter @Vorpality

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Michael Bisping vs Georges St-Pierre odds: ‘The Count’ opens as betting underdog against returning ‘Rush’ for UFC 217

Ultimate Fighting Championship (UFC) middleweight titleholder Michael Bisping will headline the upcoming UFC 217 pay-per-view (PPV) mixed martial arts (MMA) event against former welterweight kingpin Georges St-Pierre, who returns from his lengthy layoff with some extra meat on his bones.

They’ll do the deed on Sat., Nov. 4, 2017 inside Madison Square Garden in New York City, but if the opening odds from Bovada are any indication, “The Count” will enter his latest title defense as the betting underdog.

Bisping is sitting at +125 against St-Pierre’s -155.

“Rush” is currently swimming in the United States Anti-Doping Agency (USADA) testing pool, clearing his name (and his urine) before entering the Octagon this fall. Bisping, meanwhile, is rehabbing a knee injury that kept him sidelined since last October.

In fact, the countless delays forced promotion president Dana White to reassign St-Pierre to the winner of Tyron Woodley vs. Demian Maia; however, “The Chosen One” stunk up the joint at UFC 214 and lost his chance for a payday fit for a king.

So, any fight fans ready to jump on the Bisping vs. St-Pierre betting line?

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Returning to spot of shocking loss means little to Fedor

When Fedor Emelianenko steps into the cage on Saturday night against Matt Mitrione, it will be the exact location of his most famous loss. But that seems of little concern to him.

Fedor Emelianenko, the man who still has to be regarded as the most successful heavyweight fighter in MMA history, returns on Saturday night to the exact spot where he went from myth to human.

On June 26, 2010, in just his second fight with Strikeforce, Emelianenko was facing Fabricio Werdum in San Jose, Calif., at what was then the HP Pavilion and is now the SAP Center, a hotbed for MMA for more than a decade that had housed some of the most historically significant fights in history. By no means was the fight expected to be one-sided, as Werdum was among the most skilled heavyweights in the sport and had been in the ring and cage with top competition for years.

Still, few thought Werdum would win. For all real purposes, Emelianenko had gone 33 fights without a clean loss. The lone blemish on his record came nearly ten years earlier, a cut stoppage from an illegal elbow in a bout with Tsuyoshi Kosaka. By all rights that fight should have been a disqualification on Kosaka or a no contest. But it was in Japan in 2000. The sport was in its formative years, with no set rules, and decisions didn’t always make logical sense.

While no championship was at stake, many considered Emelianenko the legitimate heavyweight world champion going into that fight. He had been champion of Pride when it had the best heavyweight talent in the world since 2003. Pride may have gone out of business, but Fedor had not lost since. Even when Werdum got him in a triangle — because Emelianenko had found himself in deep trouble in so many fights, yet always managed to find his way out — it was hard to envision he could lose. Time seemingly stood still as he was in that triangle, and then he tapped out.

That shocking moment — one of the most memorable in the sport’s history — seems to have less meaning to Emelianenko (35-4-1-1) than fans.

When asked if it means something to him to come back to the same location more than six years later, he unemotionally replied through an interpreter, “Maybe not, this is how it happened due to God.”

Emelianenko headlines Saturday’s Bellator show on Spike TV against Matt Mitrione (11-5), a former college football star at Purdue who bounced around the NFL for a few years before making a name for himself with his outgoing personality as a mid-level UFC heavyweight. One year ago, he let his UFC contract expire, frustrated with the organization, and signed with Bellator, a decision he said he has never second-guessed.

“I didn’t like where UFC was headed,” Mitrione said. “I didn’t like the forced nature of things. I didn’t like the way we were manipulated.”

His deal started when he auditioned for a sport as a color commentator for Bellator’s kickboxing league, and was told that they wouldn’t hire him for that spot if he still worked for UFC.

“It’s played out well,” he said. “I’m happy at all levels, happy with the appreciation, happy with the opportunity I’ve gotten at all levels. I don’t see this as being a short-term thing. Its not a way to get back. I’ll retire with Bellator.”

Bellator president Scott Coker noted that the deal to bring Emelianenko back to the U.S. was very different from his previous one in 2009 when he was running Strikeforce. Back then it was all about negotiations with M-1 Global, which made getting on the same page very difficult. This deal had its rocky moments, but in the end it was Coker and Emelianenko who struck an agreement without third-party involvement.

“Honestly, we kind of talked about a deal, and we got some lawyers involved, and then it got kind of hung up,” said Coker. “And then I jumped on a call with Fedor and his translator, Tanya, and we hammered it out in 45 minutes.

“We had hired a lawyer in Russia to represent us. It took three or four months of back-and-forth, and once we started talking directly, 45 minutes later, we had a deal, and they inked it within a couple of days.”

“The contract is for several fights, so that’s the goal,” said Emelianenko, who said how long he remains in the sport is God’s will.

Mitrione is about four inches taller, and will probably be 20 or more pounds heavier. He’s also more athletic than most of Emelianenko’s previous foes. But none of that seems to have any effect on Emelianenko.

“At this moment, I don’t have any concerns,” he said. “We’ll see during the fight.”

But at 40 — and ever since the Werdum loss — it’s clear he’s not the same fighter he once was. Even Fedor himself admits things are different.

“I feel myself getting old,” he said. “But the training is still the same. I’m the same weight. The training is always very difficult, hard and long.”

Mitrione is 38 yet, having come to the sport in his thirties, says he doesn’t necessarily feel the encroachment of age.

“I’m really lucky, but I don’t feel differently,” he said. “I believe I’m a Highlander. I’m not the only one, but I’m one of the few. My body feels great. It feels fantastic, I also changed the way I train. I don’t spar with big gloves and I don’t take punches to the face in training. Everything is live from the neck down.”

Mitrione noted that over the years his motto has become that he’s not paid to spar and get hurt in training, he trains to make sure he gets to the fight. He’s also concerned about his brain, noting he constantly engages in things to stimulate his brain after a lifetime in football and fighting.

“I think he’s excited,” said Coker about Mitrione. “That’s a big tough kid, really athletic, he’s got a big punch. This is an even fight to me, 50/50, whoever gets there first. I think Fedor’s excited. I think you’ll see a great match on Saturday night.”

“Is it my Super Bowl?” Mitrione said, when asked how this would compare to anything else he’s done in sports. “I don’t know. I can tell you after I win. I don’t know now. I think it’s just another day right now. It’s just another competition I’m involved in.”

Mitrione said the only thing he can compare this to right now was his 2010 fight with Kimbo Slice in Montreal.

“My first real fight in the UFC, not on Ultimate Fighter, was with Kimbo,” Mitrione said. “Kimbo had a Tyson-esque aura about him back then.”

“It parallels to fighting Kimbo, the aura, the hype, the trash talk from his fans. I see a lot of parallels. As far as every other sport, a fight is it’s own animal. I don’t really see it (a comparison to a football game). The Kimbo fight was somewhat similar although obviously the level of fighter isn’t similar.”

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