Tag Archive for plan

‘Reinventing’ himself at Tristar, Vitor Belfort says Nate Marquardt win went according to plan of patience

After 20 years, Vitor Belfort still believes he is evolving as a fighter. And he sought out to show that Saturday night.

The UFC legend said he wanted to go the distance in his fight with Nate Marquardt at UFC 212 in Rio de Janeiro. That was part of the game plan, Belfort said. It worked. “The Phenom” captured a unanimous decision (29-28, 29-28, 29-28) victory to snap a three-fight losing streak.

“We are reinventing Vitor Belfort again,” Belfort said at the post-fight press conference. “So, we are changing a lot of things in the game, a lot of things I was doing wrong. Not rushing, taking my time. We had more power in the third round than the first round. That’s a good thing.”

Belfort, 40, has been known throughout his decorated career for spurts of speed and power that quickly ended the nights of his opponents. Now two decades into this career, Belfort is looking toward a new approach while training in a new environment: Tristar Gym in Montreal. This is the first time Belfort has gone to a decision since 2007.

“Every victory, you have to be happy,” Belfort said. “I want to knock him out and I hurt him pretty bad in the second round, in the third round. He was throwing some kicks just to buy time. I was making mistakes not checking the kicks. But i wanted to fight three rounds. I wanted to go all the way. I want to enjoy the fights.”

Belfort (26-13, 1 NC) alluded to this being a possible retirement fight after he lost to Kelvin Gastelum by first-round TKO in March. This week, though, he changed his tune, saying he still has more fights left on his UFC deal and he doesn’t plan on going anywhere. After the victory, Belfort told interviewer Brian Stann in the cage that he still has another five fights left in him. Belfort said he told Tristar coach Firas Zahabi the same thing.

“Something stirred in me, so I love to train again, I love to fight again,” Belfort said. “That’s something that’s been away from me for my last three fights, to tell you the truth. I was burned out.”

It wasn’t the best camp in Canada. Belfort said it was only three weeks and he got a cut on his forehead in the second week that needed 10 stitches to close. That’s why the Brazilian was wearing sunglasses and a beanie indoors all week, to cover the cosmetic damage.

None of that ended up mattering in the bout. Belfort did close strong, winning the third round clearly. The first two were much closer and many felt Marquardt did enough to win. But all three judges gave Belfort the nod.

With a much more positive view than he has had in a while, Belfort is open to anything next. He said he has one fight remaining on his UFC deal, but he plans on leaving the business end of things to his team. The training and fighting is what Belfort said he’ll focus on and he’s back to being thrilled by those again.

Saturday night marked Belfort’s 40th fight and maybe he didn’t look like the “Phenom” of old, but it was good enough to get an important win.

Belfort said he recently listened to a speech by Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg at Harvard and it opened his eyes.

“Everyone is a failure,” Belfort said. “Beyonce, before she became a hitmaker, she failed. Everyone’s got failures. Failure is just a step to victory. Unfortunately, now we’re used to everything fast.

“Unfortunately, not everything works like SnapChat or Instagram or Twitter. There’s certain things that take time and you have to have patience and confidence to know that everything is going to work out.”

The Belfort brand, recently refurbished, is still humming along.

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ABC medical committee will recommend weight-cutting reform plan to ABC body

There is a push to expand a weight-cutting reform plan outside the state where it originated.

The Association of Boxing Commissions and Combative Sports (ABC) medical committee voted this week to recommend a sweeping California weight-cutting plan to the full ABC body at the annual conference in July, MMA Fighting has learned.

California State Athletic Commission (CSAC) executive officer Andy Foster and his team wrote up a 10-point plan which attempts to curtail severe dehydration and extreme weight cutting earlier this month. Foster presented it to the CSAC medical advisory committee last week and will bring it up for a vote at the next commission meeting May 16.

The plan includes a fight-day weight check, additional weight classes and making repeat weight miss offenders go up in division. It was written in response to countless instances of extreme weight cutting affecting the health of fighters and loss of scheduled bouts.

“I didn’t have anything to do with formulating this 10-point plan, but I read it and kind of dissected it and I think it’s pretty genius,” said Association of Ringside Physicians (ARP) president Dr. Larry Lovelace, who is on the ABC medical committee. “It’s not perfect, but it’s pretty close to perfect. I think it’s gonna create a safe environment for the fighters and ultimately that’s what it’s all about.”

The ABC medical committee approved the plan for recommendation to the full ABC body unanimously. Foster is the chair of the committee. The full ABC membership will vote on the plan at the conference, which will be July 22-26 at the Mohegan Sun in Connecticut.

Of course, even it passes through the ABC, that does not mean it’ll automatically become rule in every state and province. The ABC passed changes to the Unified Rules of MMA last year and not every jurisdiction has adopted them. Each commission will have to enact the plan individually, which is no guarantee.

“I applaud Andy Foster and the CSAC proposing changes to stop dangerous weight-cutting,” said Dr. Margaret Goodman, who sits on the ARP board of directors and the ABC medical committee. “For years now, I’ve recommended serial weigh-ins including one the morning of the fight allowing only a certain percent gain. We have to stop waiting to see if a fighter passes out at the weigh-in to make a determination to cancel a bout.”

The 10-point plan calls for weight checks on fight day to see if athletes gained more than 10 percent of their body weight back in between the weigh-ins and the fight. Any fighter who gained more than 10 percent back will be asked to move up in weight class for his or her next bout or cleared by a doctor to compete in the lower division. (The number was initially 8 percent, but that was changed by CSAC doctors last week.)

One of the best things about this part of the plan, Lovelace said, is it’s not eliminating fights at the 11th hour, which would be a nightmare for promoters.

“If a guy doesn’t make weight, he’s not automatically disqualified,” said Lovelace, who is the head ringside physician in Oklahoma. “He’s just going to have to move up a weight class for the next time, for the next show. It’s not too strict; it’s not gonna be a promotion buster or anything like that. But at the same time, it does add quite a good element of safety to the risk of the weight cutting.”

Another thing Lovelace likes is the overhauled medical forms that fighters and doctors will have to fill out as part of the licensing process. On the new forms, athletes must fill out what they intend to be their lowest intended weight class and the doctor will evaluate whether that is possible based on the athlete’s weight at the moment and the physical examination.

There’s even a guide on the form that informs doctors the MMA weight classes and what weight is 10 percent above them. That 10 percent figure is what doctors have said is the beginning of the danger zone in terms of extreme weight cutting and severe dehydration.


“As a doc that has sometimes dealt with other docs that don’t know anything about combat sports, all the help you can get is great,” Lovelace said. “I think that form that they gave for fighters to take to the doc is a good one.”

The 10-point plan also includes the inclusion of a fighter’s win bonus in the fine if that fighter misses weight and the addition of new weight classes (in 10-pound intervals), which has already been passed by the ABC rules committee and medical committee.

“Weight cutting is a big deal,” Lovelace said. “We’ve seen deaths and near deaths with people cutting too much weight. In a perfect world, we would know what everyone’s walking around weight is. They would weigh-in every month or go to a place every couple of months just to see what they really weigh when they’re just not training. And then we can limit how much they can lose. But with privacy laws and things like that, you just can’t do that anymore.”

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CSAC to propose fight-day weight check in 10-point plan to combat extreme weight cutting

California’s quest for weight-cutting reform is marching on with a proposal for sweeping changes to the sport of mixed martial arts.

A 10-point plan to combat extreme weight cutting, which includes a fight-day weight check for athletes, will be submitted by California State Athletic Commission (CSAC) executive officer Andy Foster to the commission’s Medical Advisory Committee at a meeting Saturday in Los Angeles, per a document posted to the CSAC website. The results of that discussion will be brought to the full commission to be voted on May 16.

The ambitious plan includes licensing fighters by weight class; the addition of new weight classes; making fighters move up a division if they miss weight more than once; dehydration checks; and 30-day and 10-day weight checks for high-level title fights.

Perhaps the biggest change would be a weight check on fight day to see if the athlete gained back more than 8 percent of his or her body weight after weigh-ins. Per the proposal, if the fighter puts on more weight than the 8 percent, the fight might not be cancelled, but that fighter could be made to go up in weight for his or her next bout.

On average, the majority of MMA fighters at every level gain back more than 8 percent of their body weight between the weigh-ins and the fight. For example, a featherweight fighter weighs in at 145 pounds, but will likely step into the cage at more than 156.6 pounds, which is an eight-percent increase from 145.

An increase in penalty for fighters who miss weight at the official weigh-ins has already been put in motion and is part of the 10-point plan. Last week at a CSAC meeting, Foster said he would begin drafting contracts that would change the way fighters are fined for missing weight. Now, in addition to the current fine, 20 percent will be taken from the win bonus of the fighter who misses weight and that money will be given to the opponent who made weight. Previously, only the show money was fined 20 percent, with half going to the commission and half going to the opponent. This new rule would only come into play if the fighter who misses weight wins the bout.

Here’s a glance at some of the other proposed provisions in the 10-point plan:

  • Licensing by weight class: Fighters must put on their license application their lowest intended weight class. Additions to the application will include questions about dehydration and whether or not the fighter has ever missed weight. Based on that information and a physical examination, the doctor and commission will determine if that weight class is safe for the athlete to make. The licensing process is usually done months before the fight.
  • New weight classes: This was already proposed by the Association of Boxing Commissions and Combative Sports (ABC) rules committee and and medical committee last year, but did not garner much support from promoters and was not brought to a vote by the full ABC body. The ABC, which governs the Unified Rules of MMA, would need to pass this in order for it to take effect. The proposal states that weight classes should be 10 pounds apart until the heavier divisions — 125, 135, 145, 155, 165, 175, 185, 195, 205, 225, 265. That’s an addition of four new weight classes and the elimination of one – 170.
  • Database change: Foster has already requested the ABC database, which commission directors use to communicate with other commissions regarding license status of fighters, and official ABC record keeper mixedmartialarts.com to include weight classes in their information provided to commissions. CSAC also wants the matchmaker to list the weight of the fighters at the time the fight was signed.
  • Weight offenders: If a fighter misses weight more than once, CSAC is proposing to require that fighter to move up a division until a doctor determines the lower weight is healthy for the athlete to make.
  • Dehydration checks: Specific gravity testing on athletes by doctors to determine if they are dehydrated at the official weigh-in and the fight-day weight check. This is already something CSAC is doing on fight days in certain cases.
  • WBC-style weight checks: The boxing sanctioning body does weight checks 30 days and 10 days out of high-level title fights. CSAC wants to bring something like that to MMA. The issue would be how to accurately communicate the fighters weights to commission officials if no inspector is on site.

Extreme weight cutting via severe dehydration by fighters can effect short- and long-term health and in-fight performance, according to doctors and experts. It has also affected promoters. The UFC had to pull its co-main event at UFC 209 earlier this month when Khabib Nurmagomedov had to be taken to the hospital during his weight cut.

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Jacare Souza Already Talking Exit Plan

It’s possible, with this new UFC leadership, that we’ve seen Ronaldo “Jacare” Souza go as high as he’s going to go in the Octagon. After all, his trash-talking sucks, he’s not a knockout artist, and he’s definitely not Irish. But that seems fine with the Brazilian, who, as per MMAFighting, was talking about an exit […]

The post Jacare Souza Already Talking Exit Plan appeared first on Caged Insider.

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Khabib Nurmagomedov: If I don’t Get My Title Shot Next I Have Different Plan I Won’t Be Fighting In UFC

Well it seems like Khabib Nurmagomedov is finally taking a hard stance on his UFC future. After putting in a dominant performance against Michael Johnson at UFC 205, the Russian wrecking machine made it very evident what he wants next. Besides screaming at Dana White during his match, demanding for a title shot, he went on the microphone after his win and once again staked his claim to the UFC lightweight title. But it seems like he’s taking his case to Twitter and letting everyone know exactly how he feels about his future in MMA.

When you sit back and think about it, Khabib has a pretty strong claim for the lightweight title shot. He’s undefeated in the UFC and has put on some pretty impressive and dominant performances. No one is denying his ability. However, in terms of selling tickets, casual fan notoriety, and his place in the division, no one should be surprised if the UFC decides to go another way. It wouldn’t necessarily be fair, but since the sale of the company this past company to WME-IMG, choosing business over what the rankings dictate should come as no surprise to anyone.

There’s also the fact that new UFC lightweight champion Conor McGregor has decided to take a bit of time off from the sport. Upon his return there will be a ton of options awaiting him. He could have a rematch with Interim featherweight champion Jose Aldo, could complete his trilogy with Nate Diaz for the lightweight belt, or could even see himself facing off against Tony Ferguson.

Whatever the case may be, the odds do seem stacked against Khabib heading into the future. With this announcement from the proud Russian fighter, don’t be surprised if UFC 205 is the last time we see Khabib Nurmagomedov inside the octagon.

Do you think the UFC will give Khabib Nurmagomedov his title shot?


Jonathan Salmon is a writer, martial arts instructor, and geek culture enthusiast. Check out his Twitter and Facebook to keep up with his antics.

 

The post Khabib Nurmagomedov: If I don’t Get My Title Shot Next I Have Different Plan I Won’t Be Fighting In UFC appeared first on Cagepotato.

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Khabib Nurmagomedov: If I don’t Get My Title Shot Next I Have Different Plan I Won’t Be Fighting In UFC

Well it seems like Khabib Nurmagomedov is finally taking a hard stance on his UFC future. After putting in a dominant performance against Michael Johnson at UFC 205, the Russian wrecking machine made it very evident what he wants next. Besides screaming at Dana White during his match, demanding for a title shot, he went on the microphone after his win and once again staked his claim to the UFC lightweight title. But it seems like he’s taking his case to Twitter and letting everyone know exactly how he feels about his future in MMA.

When you sit back and think about it, Khabib has a pretty strong claim for the lightweight title shot. He’s undefeated in the UFC and has put on some pretty impressive and dominant performances. No one is denying his ability. However, in terms of selling tickets, casual fan notoriety, and his place in the division, no one should be surprised if the UFC decides to go another way. It wouldn’t necessarily be fair, but since the sale of the company this past company to WME-IMG, choosing business over what the rankings dictate should come as no surprise to anyone.

There’s also the fact that new UFC lightweight champion Conor McGregor has decided to take a bit of time off from the sport. Upon his return there will be a ton of options awaiting him. He could have a rematch with Interim featherweight champion Jose Aldo, could complete his trilogy with Nate Diaz for the lightweight belt, or could even see himself facing off against Tony Ferguson.

Whatever the case may be, the odds do seem stacked against Khabib heading into the future. With this announcement from the proud Russian fighter, don’t be surprised if UFC 205 is the last time we see Khabib Nurmagomedov inside the octagon.

Do you think the UFC will give Khabib Nurmagomedov his title shot?


Jonathan Salmon is a writer, martial arts instructor, and geek culture enthusiast. Check out his Twitter and Facebook to keep up with his antics.

 

The post Khabib Nurmagomedov: If I don’t Get My Title Shot Next I Have Different Plan I Won’t Be Fighting In UFC appeared first on Cagepotato.

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Eddie Alvarez on Conor McGregor loss: ‘I didn’t stick to the plan, and I think I paid for it’

Conor McGregor accomplished something no fighter in a decade has on Saturday night at UFC 205 when he knocked out Eddie Alvarez with a second-round flurry to become the first foe to stop Alvarez with strikes since the early stages of Alvarez’s well-traveled career.

The historic win at Madison Square Garden also made McGregor the only two-division champion to ever reign in the UFC, and afterward Alvarez was left to reconcile forever being on the wrong side of MMA history.

“I’m disappointed,” Alvarez said on FOX Sports 1. “I didn’t fight a good fight. I think I went in with a plan, I didn’t stick to the plan and I think I paid for it.”

Alvarez, 32, vowed to expose McGregor in the lead-up to UFC 205, but ultimately suffered the same fate as many of the Irishman’s past opponent.

McGregor knocked Alvarez down three times in the opening round with hard strikes, then finished Alvarez for good in the second frame courtesy of a highlight-reel four-punch combination from the reigning UFC featherweight champion.

Alvarez admitted afterward that his gameplan was to kick and wrestle with McGregor, but that his plan quickly went by the wayside once the fight began.

“I kinda got lulled a bit into his game and paid for it,” Alvarez said.

“I think it was just kinda relaxed and I was just kinda like, ‘alright, it’s going to be relaxed, we’ll do it that way.’ I almost got lulled into his pace and got out of my own pace. He did a good job, hats off to him.”

With the win, McGregor not only accomplished a feat previously unseen in the Octagon by becoming a two-division champion, but he also fulfilled a goal of first established by himself when he signed with the UFC in 2013.

In doing so, “The Notorious” proved once again that the same ferocious punching power that earned him the featherweight strap will successfully translate to the upper weight divisions, and for Alvarez, that lesson came the hard way.

“The shot he hit me with (in the first round), I think I threw a shot and he came over the top, because I don’t even remember it really,” Alvarez admitted. “I just remember being on the floor and I was like, ‘wow, that was quick. Whatever that was, it was fast.‘ And I didn’t feel like it hurt me crazy. It was kind of a flash, and I’ve been there before, so I was okay with it.

“But I just boxed too much. I just boxed too much tonight, too much boxing.”

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Conor McGregor doesn’t plan to vacate titles after UFC 205: ‘Why not defend them both?’

The running narrative from the UFC is that Conor McGregor will be forced to vacate either his featherweight or lightweight title if he is able to defeat the organization’s reigning 155-pound champion, Eddie Alvarez, on Nov. 12 in the main event of UFC 205.

But McGregor is an active fighter, one who has fought an average of every four months since he recovered from ACL surgery in mid-2014, and he doesn’t see the point of ruining such a historic feat.

“Vacate? I don’t know, we’ll see about that,” McGregor said on a Thursday conference call ahead of UFC 205. “Why not defend them both? I fight every week. I only fought last week. So, I can defend them both.”

On the surface, McGregor’s assertion flies in the face of past statements made by UFC president Dana White, who has insisted all along that McGregor will be forced to give up one of his titles with a win over Alvarez.

Still, White also insisted that McGregor would be forced to give up his UFC featherweight title in order to move up in weight and challenge Alvarez in the first place, and that didn’t end up happening. So while McGregor continues to maintain that the UFC will have to “gather an army” to take one of his belts after UFC 205, he also admitted to being frustrated by people’s insistence on looking so far ahead when such a historic event is standing right in front of them.

“I’m going to go out and put on a show and we’ll go from there,” McGregor said. “Everyone always looks ahead so much, talking about vacate the belt or let’s talk Vegas. It’s like, let’s enjoy this moment right now, because it took so long to get here. So many hours went into getting the UFC into New York City and now here we are. Now here we are, a potential two-weight world champion. A superfight, champion versus champion, first time a champion has gone up. These are all historic moments.

“Everyone is talking about after. ‘We’ve got to take that belt off of him, we’ve got to get back to Vegas. Let’s just enjoy this historic moment for what it is. So that’s what I’m doing, I’m looking to enjoy this whole experience and I’m very confident in my preparation, very confident in my opponent that I’m facing, so I’m looking to just enjoy this whole process.”

McGregor, 28, is wrong when he claims to be the first UFC titleholder to go up in weight and challenge another champion — B.J. Penn memorably put his lightweight reign on hold to challenge welterweight king Georges St-Pierre at UFC 94 — but even in that case, the UFC was not willing to let Penn keep both titles in the event that he won. And at this point, considering what we’ve seen in recent months and the allowances given to McGregor, the same can’t be definitively said about UFC 205.

Considered to be one of the biggest financial draws in UFC history, McGregor captured the UFC featherweight title in late-2015 with a stunning 13-second knockout over longtime champion Jose Aldo, then immediately shot up to welterweight for a pair of fights against Nate Diaz. The Diaz bouts only happened because McGregor’s original foe, then-UFC lightweight champion Rafael dos Anjos, withdrew from UFC 196 with a foot injury, derailing McGregor’s first attempt to become a two-division UFC champion.

But now things have come full circle, and McGregor is once again readying to make his 155-pound UFC debut.

“I feel great at this weight,” McGregor said. “I’m lean, a lot leaner. I’m still eating a hell of a lot of food. Obviously it’s tougher to get to featherweight, but I think it’s crazy the way they say I can’t get to featherweight anymore, or all these crazy things, like I ain’t the undisputed champion. Like I haven’t gone in there and taken out the whole division, as early as last year. Like, December of last year, that was.

“It’s not even been a year. What’s that, eight months, 10 months, whatever? And then they’re talking about stripping and vacating and this type of stuff. Hang on a minute. What did I just go and do there? Did I not just take out that division? Am I not that champion? So wherever I sign, I’m going to fight, and you best believe I’m going to show up and be prepared. At 145, I’m the world champion. I took out them out. I’m damn good at 145, and I’m even better at 155, so wherever.”

With a chance to make history on a card that many believe will be among the highest-selling UFC pay-per-views of all-time, McGregor is finally nearing the goal that he set for himself when he entered the UFC just three years ago.

“It hasn’t been done before,” McGregor said. “It’s never even been close to a reality in this game, in the UFC. And then to do it on such a monumental stage like this, of course this will be one of my shining moments.”

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Jussier Formiga’s plan to win UFC belt includes not thinking about it

BRASILIA, Brazil — Jussier Formiga once was the No. 1 flyweight in the world, and he changed his approach to the game in order to get back to the top.

Matched up against Dustin Ortiz at UFC Fight Night 95 in Brasilia, Brazil, on Saturday night, the Nova Uniao talent decided to stop thinking about UFC title shots. Coming off a loss to Henry Cejudo in November, a result that gave his opponent a chance for the gold against flyweight kingpin Demetrious Johnson, Formiga won’t discuss title shots anymore.

“This time without fights was great because I had a chance to rethink my career,” Formiga told MMA Fighting. “I got close to fighting for the belt twice, but I have decided to stop thinking about it now. I won’t want to fight with this idea that I have to get through this guy to show something to someone. I want to fight to have fun and do what I do best. Whatever happens, happens. I will get the job done.

“Many people talk about title shots and speculate,” he continued. “When you have a good win, they always ask about the belt. But I have to stop thinking about it. I have to focus on my opponent and do what I do best.”

Even though he’s changed his mind set, Formiga, who holds wins over the likes of Wilson Reis, Zach Makovsky, Scott Jorgensen and Chris Cariaso, admits that not winning a belt in the UFC can change the way he will be seen in the future — and that gets him pumped up again.

“I believe that a fighter’s career is made of highs and lows,” he said. “I dominated the division before the UFC opened the flyweight division, and I want to show everybody I’m one of the best. It will happen naturally. Not being cocky, I know I’m still one of the best, and it will happen naturally. I will get there.”

Formiga had a long time to rethink his career, but his original plan was to compete around June in the United States. However, the Nova Uniao fighter says that the promotion kept postponing his return. In the end, it worked out perfect for him.

“I’ve been training all year for this fight,” Formiga said. “At first, I was going to fight in June, and then they moved it to July in Sioux Falls, and then to September. But I was already training. I helped Jose Aldo in his camp because I’m as tall as Frankie Edgar. When I went back to Natal, that’s when they called me with a date and opponent for my fight, so I returned to Rio for my camp. It was perfect.

“When I’m in Rio to help Aldo, we train more focused. It was a great chance to train the technical aspect of the game outside a camp. Wrestling, boxing, muay thai, and also the chance to do some different sparring during Aldo’s camp. It was a great experience for me.”

Formiga has a positive record when fighting in Brazil, winning three of his four UFC bouts in his native country. Ortiz also has good memories from Brazil, when he successfully made his Octagon debut in Rio de Janeiro by beating Jose Maria Tome via TKO.

At UFC Fight Night 95, Formiga aims to win by any means, and foresees a complicated clash style-wise.

“Dustin has an interesting style,” Formiga said. “He’s not a grappler or a striker, he pretty much does everything, so it’s a good match-up for me. Other fighters might see me as a pure grappler, but I have showed that I can fight in all areas. Dustin stood and fought 15 minutes fight (Joseph) Benavidez, and grappled with (John) Moraga, so you don’t know what to expect from him. Anything can happen.”

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UFC 196 press conference scuffle was premeditated retaliation plan by Nick Diaz

UFC 196 aint the first rodeo for the Diaz brothers, who have been known to trash talk and mean mug opponents their entire careers.

But for Nick and Nate Diaz they don’t just talk the talk. They walk it as well. Which is perhaps why they’ve been in their share of brawls over the years, from a cage brawl with Jason “Mayhem” Miller in Strikeforce to a scuffle with Khabib Nurmagomedov at World Series of Fighting.

That’s the reason it isn’t surprising that Nick Diaz and his “209″ entourage had a plan for the staredowns at the UFC 196 press conference on Thursday (March 3, 2016). As McGregor was getting ready for the staredown with his opponent Nate Diaz, he taunted the entourage standing nearby (see the TMZ Sports video above).

“What the fuck are you looking at? I’ll strangle you in a heartbeat. And you as well you little juice head,” he said, turning to Jake Shields.

“I’ll slap the shit out of you,” came the reply.

Later in the video, Nick is overheard talking to Nate about a gameplan for the staredown.

“If he even fucking touches you then it’s on,” he says, as Nate nods.

The “touch” came in the form of a punch to Diaz’s wrist, which sparked an immediate brawl on the stage. The entourage struggled to get at McGregor as the Irishman’s eyes smiled while taunting, “what’re you gonna do?”

Although McGregor seemed to get the better of that one, Diaz certainly won the staredown at the weigh-ins the next day (Fri., March 4, 2016), getting his opponent to flinch and sparking another near fight.

Phew. Thankfully we’re only hours from this fight going on. I can’t imagine a full camp of these two despising one another.

For much more on UFC 196 including previews, predictions, videos, and more, check out our comprehensive “McGregor vs. Diaz” news archive by clicking here.

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