Tag Archive for lives

Midnight Mania! Darren Till bigger, better version of McGregor, still lives in his uncle’s spare bedroom

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In 2017, Darren Till went from a relatively anonymous youngster in the most crowded division in the UFC, to a standout contender in less than a round. That’s how long it took him to demolish Donald Cerrone, handing “Cowboy” the first three-fight skid of his career. In his previous fight, Cerrone had narrowly lost by split decision to Robbie Lawler. Till picked him apart with efficiency and elegance, crowding Cerrone against the cage and unleashing clinical one-twos until Cerrone crumbled.

“All the welterweights were jealous of that and calling me Dana’s new cash cow,” Till told MMAJunkie. “If Dana’s put a target on my back, I want that. I want people to want to come and fight me so I can beat everyone on my way to the title.

“They can say what they want because if they want to come and fight me, then come and fight me. But they’re going to have a hard night because I am hard (expletive).”

Till doesn’t want to be resting on his laurels, nor does he want to take the easy road to the title. When he talks about being a light heavyweight, he’s being completely serious; that’s the division he wants to end up in after rolling through welterweight and middleweight.

“In all honesty, I am too big for the division,” he said. “You could see with Cerrone, and I know he’s a former lightweight, but I am huge at this weight. I’m going to spend some time taking over at welterweight, but then I will move up.

“People think I’m joking, but I’m also planning on going up to light heavyweight because I still have years to go and I’m going to continue to grow. I want to be a three-weight world champion.”

A former Muay Thai champion in Brazil, Till’s pressure and style have drawn obvious comparisons to Conor McGregor, and Till not only agrees, but embraces the comparison. He thinks his long fighting style and accuracy makes him a nightmare matchup for another top contender, Rafael Dos Anjos.

“A pay-per-view against dos Anjos in Brazil would be huge, and I am totally up for it,” Till said.

“The great thing is, I would go there and beat him in a round because he’s designed for me and is just too scrappy on the feet. I think Conor McGregor would have absolutely annihilated him, and I’m twice Conor’s size. I’m also a similar fighter to Conor – just much better. I would kill dos Anjos, and I just don’t know what he’s doing in this division.”

He has thoughts on Stephen “Wonderboy” Thompson too:

“I don’t feel like I’ve earned a title shot and, to be totally honest, I don’t even feel like I’ve earned a top-three spot,” the Liverpudlian said. “The only reason why I asked for ‘Wonderboy’ is because I think it would decipher who the best striker is (in welterweight division). But I don’t really care if it’s No. 1 or No. 10.

“He’s an excellent fighter, one of the best, and I don’t want to fight him for an easy route to the title, but because I want to test myself against the best. If he’s the guy to beat me and take all my momentum, then fair play to him. But I don’t believe he could do it.”

Till has clearly remained grounded since his breakout win; in fact, he still lives in his uncle’s spare bedroom. He’s even taking the bus to get around, since his car is in the shop. Unlike McGregor, Till doesn’t care about flashing his wealth on social media. He’s just here to work hard and talk shit.

“As long as I can eat and buy a pair of trainers (shoes), I’m happy,” Till said. “I’m a very content and happy man. I don’t care about the Mercs and Lamborghinis. You can leave that for the show ponies, who post all that on Instagram. I just want to work hard and talk (expletive).”


Insomnia

Matt Brown and Chuck Liddell

Someone memed Dominick Cruz and he thought it was hilarious

Of course I want to see this.

Whatever works, I guess.

Anthony Johnson trains defense with a tennis ball.

Boxing training is some of my favorite to watch, clearly.

Speaking of boxing, I would also watch these two fight half a dozen times and not get tired of it.

Sir Robert Knuckles Whittaker, New Zealand’s first UFC champion.

Mike Tyson sent Khabib Nurmagomedov some gear

Thank you my Brother @miketyson for sending me this beautiful gear. @rootsoffight

A post shared by Khabib Nurmagomedov (@khabib_nurmagomedov) on

Khabib is a funny guy. He’s a threat to all the tiramisu out there, as well as the lightweight division.

Or welterweights, if Tyron Woodley’s thinking is correct.

In case you want creepy dreams tonight:

#khabibnurmagomedov #conormcgregor #danawhite

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Michael Bisping hitting pads. Will his next fight be his last?

Working. @sanabul @myproteinuk @rvca

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I want the iron neck wrestling snake charm.

A few clips of today’s training with @kingmofh @alexcorbs @scottaskham1 and @illwavybrooks86 all athletes are in different stages of fight camp at different stages in their career and at different levels of experience so my approach is to make sure all exercise volume/intensity and modality match the circumstances. ______________________________ Without a plan you plan to fail, and without structure there is chaos. It’s about choosing the exercises that will initiate the greatest overall response while selecting the volume and intensity needed for that subjective time frame. ______________________________ Exercises in video include: -@theironneck wrestling snake charm: neck and posterior chain isometrics/quasi isometrics strength ______________________________________________ Banded Zercher Split Squat RDL: stability and posterior chain strength ______________________________________________ #fatgripz KB bent over row: grip strength and back hypertrophy ______________________________________________ Weighted Box Squat Box Jump: rate of force development, static overcome by dynamic, and explosive power _____________________________ Banded Reverse GHR Supine Plank Punches: trunk stability and quasi isometrics with anterior delt and tricep strength endurance _____________________________ Med Ball Isometric Guillotine Hold: sports specific isometric strength ______________________________ For training program templates, virtual coaching, and seminar schedule go to Darustrong.com or DM #mmastrengthandconditioningcoach #mmastrengthandconditioning #strengthcoach #periodization #programming #power #strength #performance #darustrong #americantopteam @fightcampconditioning

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Slips, Rips, and Double-Leg Clips

Douglas Lima is a dangerous fighter

Doo Ho Choi has been in amazing fights for a long time now.

That entry is so silky smooth from Jordan Burroughs

Another brutal choke #bjjlife #jiujitsulifestyle #bjjlifestyle #judo

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Good Reads


Podcasts and Video

The MMA Ratings Podcast

Bushido Talk

Stay woke, Maniacs! Follow me on Twitter and Facebook @Vorpality

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UFC Fight Night 114 Results: Sergio Pettis Finally Lives Up to His Potential

It’s time for the main event of UFC Fight Night 114, which means Sergio Pettis has the spotlight shining brightly on him and there’s no room for the shadow of his older, much more accomplished brother Anthony to intrude. That’s the theory, at least. In reality, we’ve always gazed upon Sergio through a lens filtered […]

The post UFC Fight Night 114 Results: Sergio Pettis Finally Lives Up to His Potential appeared first on Caged Insider.

Caged Insider

TUF 24 Finale Results: Sara McMann Lives Up to Her Potential, Taps Alexis Davis

The knock against Sara McMann is that, as a Olympic silver medalist in wrestling, she has all the potential in the world, she just hasn’t lived up to it in the cage. Well, tonight she started to show it, tapping out the veteran Alexis Davis. Things started off a little rough, though. In the opening […]

The post TUF 24 Finale Results: Sara McMann Lives Up to Her Potential, Taps Alexis Davis appeared first on Caged Insider.

Caged Insider

Sage Northcutt Lives Up to the Hype

The UFC 192 Fight Pass prelims are in the books, and the star of that particular set of prelim bouts was of course the heavily-hyped Sage Northcutt. Although he looks like he should be modeling Calvin Klein underwear, Northcutt apparently sports pretty decent karate skills and impeccable timing – which he used to overwhelm Francisco […]

The post Sage Northcutt Lives Up to the Hype appeared first on Caged Insider.

Caged Insider

Retired UFC Fight Lives Up to His Potential

Chris Leben’s retirement plan apparently involves weapons possession, trespassing, violating an order of protection against domestic violence, and paying $ 100,000 in bail to get out of a San Diego jail. *Sigh* When last we saw our beloved TUF 1 veteran, he was retiring from the sport on his stool after a round of getting clobbered […]

The post Retired UFC Fight Lives Up to His Potential appeared first on Caged Insider.

Caged Insider

Court McGee, the once-dead man, now saving lives and breaking addictions with Hope 361

Court McGee’s story is well known. On September 9th, 2005, at 10:56 p.m., the fighter’s heart stopped beating for eight ghostly minutes. He was dead, for all intents and purposes, blown out by a hazy narcotic cocktail at his cousin’s house, before being miraculously resuscitated on a last-ditch effort by EMT workers who were all but resigned to the fate of the lifeless man who lay of the floor.

McGee ultimately parlayed his second chance at life into something far greater than he ever could have imagined, finding salvation in mixed martial arts, compiling an impressive early career record, then claiming gold as the against-all-odds winner of The Ultimate Fighter 11. McGee has become somewhat of a fixture in the UFC since, competing seven times across the middleweight and welterweight division to mixed results.

And while injuries have kept him sidelined thus far in 2014, that time on the shelf has not gone to waste.

McGee’s new venture, Hope361.com, is a non-profit platform for the fighter and former addicts alike to share their inspirational stories, offering words of wisdom, encouragement, and advice to those still wrestling with the darkness of substance abuse or those struggling to help loved ones break the cycle of addiction.

“Drug addition is non-biased,” McGee explained on Monday’s edition of The MMA Hour. “It doesn’t matter where you came from, who you are, religion, it doesn’t matter. It doesn’t matter how much money or how little money you have, drug addiction is non-biased, and it tears everybody apart. So we want to be able to provide a tool for people to use for those who are afflicted around them.”


McGee characterizes the mission of Hope 361 by relaying a story of the clinical social worker who launched McGee’s own recovery out from the depths of heroin abuse.

Way back when, as the fighter drowned in his post-overdose fog, McGee’s understandably distraught parents experienced a chance run-in with the unnamed man within the corridors of the emergency room. They expressed their deeply felt confusion as to how to help their addict son, so the man who would serve as McGee’s inadvertent guardian angel introduced the fighter’s parents to the idea of an intensive in-patient treatment facility, ultimately referring them to the specific facility where McGee would regain his grasp on sobriety.

“Had they not come across him, I never would’ve been given the opportunity or put in that place,” McGee said. “I had felony drug charges. I was looking to do time, and those were my options. It was either being incarcerated or dying. I knew no other way to live. I was so deep in my addiction, I had no idea. But because of that guy who knew where to get help, that suggested I go to that treatment facility, I was saved.

“In a sense, we’re being that guy. This is what [addicts] do, this is how they maintain their recovery, this is where they got help, and this is what they do now. That’s what our website does. We’re acting as that person,” explained McGee.

“The person who’s struggling may not get anything from the videos. But I promise you, the loved ones around them who are afflicted the most will see it. My family didn’t know what to do. We are giving them that. … It creates a direction for these people, for their family members or bosses or whoever. It doesn’t matter, whoever has somebody or knows somebody can get on this website, can get the inspiration from the videos, and get direction to where they can get help.”

Last Monday was McGee’s 3,075th straight day of sobriety. He’s had three surgeries this year alone to correct injuries on his right hand and wrist, but all have been non-narcotic. “That’s how I have to live life,” he said simply.

Of late, with the launch of Hope 361, McGee has taken his message on the road, speaking everywhere from prisons in San Luis Obispo County to junior high schools in Emery County, Utah — any place where his story of inspiration may be of some use, even if it touches just one troubled soul out of one-thousand.

In the meantime, he’s also working on an autobiography with the help of mixed martial arts journalist E. Spencer Kyte, while grinding through an hour worth of physical therapy a day to rehabilitate his wrist and hand. McGee hopes to return to the UFC by next spring. It’s slow going, but even on the sidelines, he’s not letting the speed bumps of life get him down.

And in the end, it all comes back to the genesis of Hope 361. There was a time when McGee’s reality was nothing but that cycle of negativity and abuse. A self-perpetuating, self-eating circle that ultimately led his death, however brief it may have been.

But that one moment, that one shift when everything changed — that is the gift McGee will forever be grateful for. Now it is his turn to pay it forward.

“360 degrees is doing the same thing over and over again, expecting different results,” McGee said. “But if you change that one degree … anything is possible.

“The [emergency] workers said I didn’t have a (heart) response for eight minutes and so I shouldn’t be here. But because of a few unusual circumstances, I was given a new direction in life. I was inspired by being of service to a wrestling team to start competing and it went from one thing to another, until pretty soon I’m fighting on the biggest stage in the world. I want to use this to create hope, inspiration, and give direction to those who are afflicted. And in doing that, it’s given me a life beyond my wildest dreams.”

MMA Fighting – All Posts

Court McGee, the once-dead man, now saving lives and breaking addictions with Hope 361

Court McGee’s story is well known. On September 9th, 2005, at 10:56 p.m., the fighter’s heart stopped beating for eight ghostly minutes. He was dead, for all intents and purposes, blown out by a hazy narcotic cocktail at his cousin’s house, before being miraculously resuscitated on a last-ditch effort by EMT workers who were all but resigned to the fate of the lifeless man who lay of the floor.

McGee ultimately parlayed his second chance at life into something far greater than he ever could have imagined, finding salvation in mixed martial arts, compiling an impressive early career record, then claiming gold as the against-all-odds winner of The Ultimate Fighter 11. McGee has become somewhat of a fixture in the UFC since, competing seven times across the middleweight and welterweight division to mixed results.

And while injuries have kept him sidelined thus far in 2014, that time on the shelf has not gone to waste.

McGee’s new venture, Hope361.com, is a non-profit platform for the fighter and former addicts alike to share their inspirational stories, offering words of wisdom, encouragement, and advice to those still wrestling with the darkness of substance abuse or those struggling to help loved ones break the cycle of addiction.

“Drug addition is non-biased,” McGee explained on Monday’s edition of The MMA Hour. “It doesn’t matter where you came from, who you are, religion, it doesn’t matter. It doesn’t matter how much money or how little money you have, drug addiction is non-biased, and it tears everybody apart. So we want to be able to provide a tool for people to use for those who are afflicted around them.”


McGee characterizes the mission of Hope 361 by relaying a story of the clinical social worker who launched McGee’s own recovery out from the depths of heroin abuse.

Way back when, as the fighter drowned in his post-overdose fog, McGee’s understandably distraught parents experienced a chance run-in with the unnamed man within the corridors of the emergency room. They expressed their deeply felt confusion as to how to help their addict son, so the man who would serve as McGee’s inadvertent guardian angel introduced the fighter’s parents to the idea of an intensive in-patient treatment facility, ultimately referring them to the specific facility where McGee would regain his grasp on sobriety.

“Had they not come across him, I never would’ve been given the opportunity or put in that place,” McGee said. “I had felony drug charges. I was looking to do time, and those were my options. It was either being incarcerated or dying. I knew no other way to live. I was so deep in my addiction, I had no idea. But because of that guy who knew where to get help, that suggested I go to that treatment facility, I was saved.

“In a sense, we’re being that guy. This is what [addicts] do, this is how they maintain their recovery, this is where they got help, and this is what they do now. That’s what our website does. We’re acting as that person,” explained McGee.

“The person who’s struggling may not get anything from the videos. But I promise you, the loved ones around them who are afflicted the most will see it. My family didn’t know what to do. We are giving them that. … It creates a direction for these people, for their family members or bosses or whoever. It doesn’t matter, whoever has somebody or knows somebody can get on this website, can get the inspiration from the videos, and get direction to where they can get help.”

Last Monday was McGee’s 3,075th straight day of sobriety. He’s had three surgeries this year alone to correct injuries on his right hand and wrist, but all have been non-narcotic. “That’s how I have to live life,” he said simply.

Of late, with the launch of Hope 361, McGee has taken his message on the road, speaking everywhere from prisons in San Luis Obispo County to junior high schools in Emery County, Utah — any place where his story of inspiration may be of some use, even if it touches just one troubled soul out of one-thousand.

In the meantime, he’s also working on an autobiography with the help of mixed martial arts journalist E. Spencer Kyte, while grinding through an hour worth of physical therapy a day to rehabilitate his wrist and hand. McGee hopes to return to the UFC by next spring. It’s slow going, but even on the sidelines, he’s not letting the speed bumps of life get him down.

And in the end, it all comes back to the genesis of Hope 361. There was a time when McGee’s reality was nothing but that cycle of negativity and abuse. A self-perpetuating, self-eating circle that ultimately led his death, however brief it may have been.

But that one moment, that one shift when everything changed — that is the gift McGee will forever be grateful for. Now it is his turn to pay it forward.

“360 degrees is doing the same thing over and over again, expecting different results,” McGee said. “But if you change that one degree … anything is possible.

“The [emergency] workers said I didn’t have a (heart) response for eight minutes and so I shouldn’t be here. But because of a few unusual circumstances, I was given a new direction in life. I was inspired by being of service to a wrestling team to start competing and it went from one thing to another, until pretty soon I’m fighting on the biggest stage in the world. I want to use this to create hope, inspiration, and give direction to those who are afflicted. And in doing that, it’s given me a life beyond my wildest dreams.”

MMA Fighting – All Posts

Interview with UFC Fight Night 37′s Louis Gaudinot: ‘I change peoples’ lives’

UFC Flyweight contender Louis Gaudinot sat down with MMA Mania’s Cory Braiterman to talk about his “life-changing” job, his weight, his transition from karate into full-fledged mixed martial arts and more.

Louis Gaudinot loves it when people ask him what he does for a living.

“I change people’s lives,” he tells them.

“To get a kid to come in here who’s six years old, who’s shy, getting bullied, has no confidence and to teach him how to defend himself, how to stand up to bullies and to be more outgoing — the parents come up to me and tell me, ‘You really did change my child’s life.’ And it isn’t just that: You get an adult who comes here and he loses 50, 60 pounds and adds years onto his life. You teach a woman some self-defense and she has more confidence walking down the street, taking the train, knowing she’s a bit safer.”

Gaudinot, who’s been a martial artist since age six with the Tiger Schulmann schools, is currently the head instructor at the Hoboken, N.J., location. Oh, and he’s currently the No. 11-ranked Flyweight on the Ultimate Fighting Championship’s (UFC) rankings and No. 14 on the meta-rankings.

The Yonkers, N.Y., native was disappointed that he wasn’t able to get on the recent UFC 169 card in nearby Newark, N.J., but is excited to be fighting Phil Harris at UFC Fight Night 37 “Gustafsson vs. Manuwa” in London, England, later on this afternoon (Sat., March 8, 2014).

“I don’t think he wants to stand with me because if he does, Lineker hurt him standing up, and I went toe to toe with Lineker, so I don’t think he’ll choose that route.” -Louis Gaudinot


One of the interesting tidbits I found out from Gaudinot is some background on the Tiger Schulmann schools and how they changed from a karate dojo into a solid MMA academy. If you’re around my age, you grew up with ads for what derisively came to be known as McDojos: Schools that were often in strip malls or on the second floor of buildings above a Wendy’s that — much like the ubiquitous fast food chain — served cheap imitations of the real thing.

Given the failure of most traditional martial arts in the grander scheme of vale tudo and MMA, these schools capitalized on America’s fascination with Bruce Lee and later The Karate Kid to make karate, taekwondo and other martial arts a standard afterschool activity for children (like myself, a blue belt in karate from way back in 1988) much like little league baseball.

Tiger Schulmann’s was one of them … or so I thought.

Tiger Schulmann realized that karate wasn’t the be-all end-all of martial arts, and had always incorporated basic wrestling takedowns and things like that. Then the first UFC happened and we really started including the groundwork. He recognized the Jiu Jitsu was a game changer and was something everybody needed to know. I’m sure other traditional martial arts schools shied away from it and tried to sell their stuff more than someone else’s, but you really do need to know all the different things.

He likes to tell a story that he got his brother to allow him to put him in an armbar and told him to get out of it. His brother couldn’t and his exact words were, “Really? This is so cool!”

Among some of the other rapid-fire questions I asked the contender:

Cory Braiterman (MMA Mania): What was your favorite MMA moment?

Louis Gaudinot: As a fighter or as a fan?

Cory Braiterman (MMA Mania): Ooh, nice tangent. Both. Start with fighter.

Louis Gaudinot: When I was fighting [Jessie Riggleman] for the Ring of Combat flyweight title, it was a great fight and I jumped the guillotine late in the third round and he tapped with like five seconds left. I jumped up out of the cage and ran into the stands to hug my mom. I did it before Jose Aldo!

Cory Braiterman (MMA Mania): And as a fan?

Louis Gaudinot: Well there was watching the first UFC with my dad, but I’ve always been a big BJ Penn fan. Him beating Matt Hughes for the 170 pound title was huge because no one was giving him a chance.

Cory Braiterman (MMA Mania): What was the hardest you’ve ever been hit?

Louis Gaudinot: One of my training partners, Shane Burgos [a 3-0 featherweight], he didn’t even know, but I saw lights and was on wobbly legs. I didn’t realize it and I told him after the round. He hit me even harder than Lineker.

Cory Braiterman (MMA Mania): What is your normal walk-around weight?

Louis Gaudinot: About 141, 143

Cory Braiterman (MMA Mania): How much do you normally cut to make weight?

Louis Gaudinot: I do it the right way, hydrate myself with a lot of water. By fight week, I’m walking around at 136, 134… sweating it out. Then I’ll wake up that weigh-in morning at 129 and only have 3, 4 pounds to go.

That’s all for now, check out MMA Mania’s live coverage of UFN 37 “Manuwa vs. Gustafsson” right here!

MMAmania.com – All Posts

Morning Report: Miesha Tate rips Kim Winslow, says ‘she’s literally ruining people’s lives’

400_cat_zingano_vs_miesha_tate_9427

It’s been a little over three months since Kim Winslow infamously stopped Cat Zingano’s third-round assault on Miesha Tate. Since then things have worked out pretty well for Tate, but that doesn’t mean she forgives Winslow for what she believes was a premature stoppage.

“There’s no way in hell I’d let Kim Winslow referee another fight of mine. I think she’s horrible,” Tate told SiriusXM Fight Club (transcription courtesy of Eriksson Lau).

“I was so pissed when she stopped the fight. The first thing I did was look up at her and say, ‘Why did you stop the fight?’ And [Winslow] goes, ‘Because your face is a mess.’ I’m like, seriously? That’s why you stopped the fight? Your face is a mess and they still let you work. That’s what I felt like saying to her. I was like, are you serious right now? Did you not realize that we were coming in here to fight each other? You don’t base it off how much someone’s bleeding, you base it off whether or not they’re cognitive and they’re still trying.”

Tate went on to spend seven minutes ranting about Winslow’s decision, taking aim at everything from the referee’s dubious track record to her qualifications, or lack thereof.

“She was like a yippy Chihuahua the whole time that I was on the bottom. ‘Miesha, you gotta do something, you gotta move.’ I’m like, ‘Why? She’s not doing anything to me, she’s in my half-guard. Nobody finishes fights in half-guard.’ But the referee, I thought she was going to stop it. She was over-coaching, over-refereeing,” Tate fumed.

“It’s something that is very frustrating when you have other people who have never fought a day in their life, like Kim. She doesn’t do anything. I don’t think she deserves to be a referee. And if she is, she should go to the amateur levels where it doesn’t matter as much, and there’s not as much on the line, because she’s literally ruining people’s lives.”

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5 MUST-READ STORIES

Tate blasts Winslow. Miesha Tate ripped into Kim Winslow during a seven-minute interview with SiriusXM Fight Club, stating, among other things, that “there’s no way in hell” she’d ever allow Winslow to referee another one of her fights.

UFC 162 buyrate. Preliminary estimates have UFC 162 drawing 550,000 pay-per-view buys, making it either the second or third top-selling event of the UFC’s calendar year. UFC middleweight champion Chris Weidman dethroned Anderson Silva in the night’s stunning main event.

Riggs talks Diaz. Seven years after his infamous hospital brawl with Nick Diaz, Fight Master’s Joe Riggs revealed his side of the story to Sports Illustrated — and folks, it’s a good one.

Bellator 101 bookings. Bellator officials announced a quartet of match-ups to kick off their Season 9 lightweight tournament: Marcus Davis vs. Alexander Sarnavskiy, John Alessio vs. Will Brooks, Saad Awad vs. Martin Stapelton and Rich Clementi vs. Rob Sinclair.

Philippou’s simple request. Costa Philippou is used to keeping a busy schedule. But the UFC’s No. 7 ranked middleweight has yet to step foot into the cage in 2013, and it’s starting to wear on him. “Just give me somebody at this point,” he pleaded. “I don’t really give a s–t if it’s a big name, small name, whatever.”

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MEDIA STEW

Hey look, another ‘fan-made’ video with less than 100 views when it was tweeted out by Dana White. Just for kicks, browse through UFCVanillaGorilla’s account and check out the description for its first upload: “Bisping+Akiyama+Hardy+Condit=A­WESOME. Please don’t delete my video it’s a tribute. My dream is to work for the UFC one day, call me if you like this video Dana!!!”

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Today’s regional slice arrives to us all the way from Liverpool, England, where Mr. Mick Kay never saw it coming. (Fight starts at 1:09.)

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Don’t worry, folks. I’m taking it upon myself to force Ariel into binge-watching a marathon of Rocko’s Modern Life.

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I rarely post boxing videos, but man, this fan-made Mayweather-Canelo trailer is tremendous.

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Okay, that was a pretty solid Joe Rogan.

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MIESHA’S NOT DONE

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HELL OF A CREW

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AKA PARTY

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CONGRATS ICEMAN

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ALSO

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FIGHT ANNOUNCEMENTS

Announced yesterday (Wednesday, July 24, 2013):

  • UFC 166: Tim Boetsch (16-6) vs. Luke Rockhold (10-2)
  • UFC 166: K.J. Noons (11-7) vs. George Sotiropoulos (14-5)
  • UFC 166: Gabriel Gonzaga (15-7) vs. Shawn Jordan (15-4)
  • Bellator 101: Marcus Davis (22-9) vs. Alexander Sarnavskiy (23-1) booked for lightweight tournament
  • Bellator 101: John Alessio (34-16) vs. Will Brooks (9-1) booked for lightweight tournament
  • Bellator 101: Saad Awad (14-5) vs. Martin Stapleton (12-1) booked for lightweight tournament
  • Bellator 101: Rich Clementi (45-22-1) vs. Rob Sinclair (12-2) booked for lightweight tournament
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    FANPOST OF THE DAY

    Today’s Fanpost of the Day comes to us from Florence Romeo, who believes: Chael Sonnen Move to Middleweight Will Spark Title Fight

    Chael Sonnen announced a return to the middleweight division and a new five-fight contract on UFC Tonight.

    “There are two guys I want to get matched up with. The first is Vitor Belfort because he’s awesome and he’s on an incredible roll. Second, is Wanderlei [Silva] who I have now found out is going back to middleweight,” said Sonnen. “The landscape has completely changed. I have anew contract, and I’m returning to the weight class.”

    Yet, one can’t help but think how coincidental the move is for Sonnen. I can’t imagine a simple weight cut by Silva or win streak by Belfort would constitute a complete change to the “landscape.” It couldn’t be Chris Weidman’s defeat of Anderson Silva for the Middleweight title, could it?

    And then, there it is; the image of Sonnen, slithering like a title-driven snake through divisions, hissing more trash talk, eyes expectantly awaiting the flash of cameras.

    First, Sonnen will compete for the second straight time in the light heavyweight division when he squares off against Mauricio Rua in the main event of UFC Fight Night in Boston on Aug. 17.

    And win or loss, Sonnen will remind all he was fighting in a heavier division, where he went “toe-to-toe” with the champion Jon Jones, because no one else had the guts. Then maybe he will fight Wanderlei Silva; a match seemingly tailor-made for Sonnen. Or maybe he won’t. Maybe he won’t fight anyone, and begin to salivate with Weidman insults, New York jokes and Matt Serra impressions.

    In those moments of humor, fans will begin to forget about Sonnen’s last fight – a TKO loss to UFC Light Heavyweight champion Jon Jones at UFC 148. They will forget the two title fight losses to former middleweight champion Anderson Silva. Discussions will permeate through the mixed martial arts community about Sonnen and Weidman’s wrestling, UFC announcer Joe Rogan will call the fight an “interesting clash of two remarkable wrestlers,” and UFC President Dana White will start to tell reporters it is the fight fan’s want to see.

    The fight will be made as the headline of a pay-per view, forums will explode with predictions, and journalists will revel in interviewing the Oregon native, who will deem the bout the “worst East Coast/West Coast rivalry since Tupac and Notorious B.I.G.”

    And yet come fight night, I will be sitting in front of my television, forgetting every word of this article, engrossed in the story line of Weidman versus Sonnen, ordering another UFC pay-per view.

    Found something you’d like to see in the Morning Report? Just hit me on Twitter @shaunalshatti and we’ll include it in tomorrow’s column.

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    Roy Nelson hopes Cheick Kongo lives up to French stereotypes at UFC 159

    NEW YORK — Roy Nelson talks about his UFC 159 fight against Cheick Kongo, how being a father affects his outlook on fighting, why he hopes Kongo will live up to French stereotypes, getting less attention going into this fight, and more.

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