Tag Archive for Legacy

Rory MacDonald Discusses Teammate Georges St. Pierre’s Legacy, Fighting Future

Georges St. Pierre’s long-time friend and Tristar Gym training partner Rory MacDonald doesn’t believe the former welterweight and middleweight champion is done with the sport.
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Legacy Fighting Alliance 33 to Include Ex-NFL Star Greg Hardy’s Third Amateur Bout

Greg Hardy’s third mixed martial arts bout will occur on a slightly bigger stage.
Recent News on Sherdog.com

Legacy Fighting Alliance 33 to Include Ex-NFL Star Greg Hardy’s Third Amateur Bout

Greg Hardy’s third mixed martial arts bout will occur on a slightly bigger stage.
Recent News on Sherdog.com

Dakota Cochrane vs. Ciro Rodrigues Tops Legacy Fighting Alliance 25 in Omaha

A welterweight clash between Dakota Cochrane and Ciro Rodrigues will serve as the main event for Legacy Fighting Alliance 25.
Recent News on Sherdog.com

Pic: Reebok unveils new UFC Fight Kit, including UFC 215 ‘Legacy Series’

Ultimate Fighting Championship (UFC) and its official sponsor, Reebok, today announced a new UFC Fight Kit as we gear up for the UFC 215: “Johnson vs. Borg” pay-per-view (PPV) event, scheduled for this Saturday night (Sept. 9, 2017) inside Rogers Place in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.

Let’s hope they avoid a repeat of this.

The revamped collection includes the new “Legacy Series” for some of the top stars of UFC 215, like women’s bantamweight No. 1 contender Valentina Shevchenko, who gets her own t-shirt (embedded below).


Reebok

And of course “Mighty Mouse” gets one too:


Reebok

Meh.

“We’re excited to launch the new UFC Fight Night Collection and Legacy Series program leading up to UFC 215, which marks our first-ever event in Edmonton,” UFC Senior Vice President of Global Consumer Products Tracey Bleczinski said. “Both collections represent the continued evolution of our fight apparel product lines, offering more advanced performance gear, while providing fight fans a unique offering of jerseys that were designed by some of their favorite UFC athletes. The level of customization with the Legacy Series is unprecedented in the world of professional sports. This program is truly a game changer.”

Pretty sure the game will stay the same in spite of these new threads.


Reebok

Reebok

Reebok

Reebok

If you’re feeling both angry and amused, you’re not alone.

For much more on this weekend’s UFC 215 championship doubleheader, which also features “Prelims” bouts on FOX Sports 1 and UFC Fight Pass, click here.

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Ciro Rodrigues Flattens UFC Vet David Michaud in Legacy Fighting Alliance 19 Headliner

Ciro Rodrigues built his reputation on a successful run on the regional circuit in his native Brazil and aimed to make a splash in his United States debut on Friday in the Legacy Fighting Alliance 19 main event.
Recent News on Sherdog.com

Ciro Rodrigues Flattens UFC Vet David Michaud in Legacy Fighting Alliance 19 Headliner

Ciro Rodrigues built his reputation on a successful run on the regional circuit in his native Brazil and aimed to make a splash in his United States debut on Friday in the Legacy Fighting Alliance 19 main event.
Recent News on Sherdog.com

Fightweets: No, Jose Aldo’s legacy is not in question

Jose Aldo and Max Holloway square off in the main event of UFC 212 tonight, which leads us right into our first question, so let’s not waste any time, here …

Aldo’s legacy

@BRayos_ 38s: Is Jose Aldo’s legacy on the line this Saturday?

Was Steph Curry’s legacy ruined because LeBron James’ Cavs beat the Warriors last year? Are Tom Brady’s five Super Bowl victories ruined because the Patriots’ defense faltered twice against the Giants? Are the turn-of-the-century Yankees tainted because they blew that one World Series against Arizona?

No, no, and no. Jose Aldo is on the short list of the greatest fighters in the history of the sport. If you count his six-year WEC/UFC featherweight title reign as one linear world championship reign — and I do, even if it’s not officially recognized as such — then he’s the second-longest-reigning champ ever under the UFC/WEC/Strikeforce umbrella.

Aldo got caught against Conor McGregor, one time in 19 fights over damn near a decade. That happens to the best of them. McGregor included. Those who like to troll Aldo about the McGregor fight with “13 seconds” seem to have erased the existence of Joseph Duffy from their minds.

And how did Aldo respond when he got knocked off his longtime perch? He didn’t go directly into career tailspin mode, like Anderson Silva. Nor did he take three years off, like Georges St-Pierre did after taking a beating and getting a gift decision against Johny Hendricks. Instead, Aldo got back on the horse and put on an magnificent performance against another of the sport’s greats in Frankie Edgar, absolutely shutting the former lightweight champ down at UFC 200 in one of the most splendid displays of footwork and accuracy we’ve even seen.

Granted, outside the cage, Aldo hasn’t done much to try to market himself or give the fans a reason to identify with him. He hasn’t tried to become a star here in North America. He might be the pound-for-pound kingpin on making empty threats of retirement and demands he gets talked out of. So when Aldo’s legacy is under attack, there isn’t an army coming to his defense as there so often is with other greats of the game.

But in the cage, Aldo’s legacy as one of the sport’s all-time best is already secure. His run at 145 compares favorably with the other great championship runs in other weight classes. Even with the McGregor loss. And that doesn’t change if Max Holloway takes the title Saturday night at UFC 212. If anything, it would be the symbol of the generational torch being passed, sort of like when Matt Hughes gave way to Georges St-Pierre at welterweight. But that loss didn’t mean Hughes isn’t a Hall of Famer. Same goes for Aldo if he loses to Holloway.

GDR and DJ

@mattpete1088: Why do we all crucify GDR for avoiding the Cyborg fight and brush off Mighty Mouse declining a fight with Dillashaw?

And why don’t we compare apples with oranges while we’re at it? Demetrious Johnson has fought everyone the UFC, and before that the WEC, has placed in front of him over the past seven years. He made his way into the No. 1 contender’s slot as an undersized bantamweight, went the distance with a prime, pre-injury Dominick Cruz, then blitzed his way through flyweight and has tied Silva’s UFC title defense record.

Mighty Mouse accomplished all that before we ever reached a point he publicly questioned whether a potential opponent would be right for him, as was the case when a fight with former bantamweight champ T.J. Dillashaw (a fight we really like) was initially floated.

Germaine de Randamie? She was middle of the pack at 135 and was gifted a spot in the fight for the first-ever UFC women’s featherweight title because the woman the belt was created for, Cris Cyborg, got hit with a provisional USADA suspension for which she was ultimately cleared. Then de Randamie won one of the most foul-marred title victories you’ll ever see in this sport over Holly Holm at UFC 208.

Since then, she’s rode a merry-go-round of excuses as to why she’s not going to fight Cyborg, and is now saying she wants to go down to 135.

One’s an all-time great champion who is balking at a matchup for the first time after years of flawless service. The other, if she keeps up at this, is well on track to go down as the single worst champion in UFC history. You’re really asking me to compare DJ to GDR?

Cyborg vs. Anderson?

@sigep422wesg: Why hasn’t @ufc signed @MeganA_mma to fight Cyborg for 145lb Title??

And then there’s the other half of this equation: What the hell do you do with the women’s featherweight belt if GDR is going to go sprinting back to bantamweight at the first sign of Cyborg’s return? Holm is back at bantamweight with a fight scheduled. Cat Zingano? Kudos to her for being willing to fight Cyborg, but the timing’s not right for the UFC 214 date Cyborg and the UFC want.

Yet, at the same time, I’m not about to join those who want to lead Megan Anderson right into slaughter just for the sake of giving Cyborg an opponent. Are you really telling me a fighter who looked in over her head against Cindy Dandois is ready for Cyborg? Anderson has the potential to be really good, but I don’t see how making her the latest in the Invicta assembly line of opponents who lose to Cyborg in short order helps her development at all.

Does that leave us with a good answer? No. But that’s what happens when you have a two-fighter division and the champ doesn’t want to fight the challenger.

Marlon Moraes debut

@iZaya18: Smart keeping Marlon Moraes on the prelims to avoid a David Branch type debut?

I’m not sure it’s about a Branch situation, where the former two-weight-class World Series of Fighting champ had a boring fight in his debut on the PPV main card. The featured prelim bout on FS1 is supposed to draw last-minute impulse buys. If the Branch fight at UFC 211 had been on basic cable, that might have turned fans away.

But I get what you’re saying. I like putting the former WSOF bantamweight champ’s UFC debut in the featured prelim bout spot on the FS1 card. Moraes has been a cable TV attraction the past several years. Maybe not an earth-shattering ratings phenom, exactly, but there was six-figure viewership on NBSCN when he fought, so someone’s been watching him. Putting Moraes on cable first is a way to showcase to channel-surfing casual fight fans that he’s now a UFC fighter. And a fight with an opponent the caliber of Assuncao is an opportunity for Moraes to show what he can do. With a solid performance, they can push him straight toward the top of the division. I like the move, but it has nothing to do with Branch.

Light heavyweight developments

@TristanChilder2: Who will Gustafsson fight next D.C. Or Jon jones??

So I don’t know about you, but the fact the light heavyweight division just got a whole lot more interesting than we had any right to expect anytime soon is one of the more pleasant surprises of 2017. Guastafsson did his part by going out last Saturday and doing exactly what he needed to do in order to prove he still belongs square in the 205 championship discussion. In front of his Swedish hometown fans, Gusty gave Glover Teixeira the sort of beating that leads to sad commentary years down the road like “(Fighter X) was never the same after that loss.”

Now, add in the UFC 214 fight between Jimi Manuwa and Volkan Oezdemir, who’s come out of nowhere to derail Ovince Saint Preux and Misha Cirkunov in back-to-back fights, and you’ve got the making of some interesting doings.

So you’ve got Daniel Cormier and Jon Jones scheduled to fight again (at this stage of the game, I won’t definitively say they will fight until I see them both in the cage in Anaheim); Gustafsson presumably getting next (there’s never been a fighter better positioned for a third shot after going 0-2 than Gus); and Manuwa-Oezdemir both providing backup in case DC or Jones drop out, or, best case, the first completely fresh, consequential contenders matchup in the division since, I dunno, maybe Jones vs. Ryan Bader.

Granted, all this doesn’t exactly make light heavyweight the new lightweight in terms of divisional depth. But if you told me even three months ago that 205 would run five fighters deep in potential intriguing matchups, I would have taken that deal in a heartbeat.

Vengeful MMA gods

@hunt5588: Why did the MMA gods take away TKZ from us again?

Because the MMA Gods are capricious beasts with endless appetites for malevolence who enjoy in doing things like giving Matt Mitrione kidney stones right before he’s supposed to fight Fedor Emelianenko and sticking pins in the lower back of a Cody Garbrandt voodoo doll during his TUF season with T.J. Dillashaw and depriving us of Chan Sung Jung at every available turn and making me write run-on sentences? Maybe some day the MMA Gods will turn the corner on their angry, wrathful Old Testament God phase, but I’m not holding my breath waiting for that to happen.

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Midnight Mania! Is Joe Rogan right about Jose Aldo’s legacy?

Bringing you the weird and wild from the world of MMA each and every weeknight

Welcome to Midnight Mania! Tonight we’ve got a discussion on Jose Aldo, Al Iaquinta training, Derrick Lewis being himself, a memory of Kimbo Slice, a ring girl accused of witchcraft, knockouts, podcasts, and much more.


The Longest 13 Seconds in History

Joe Rogan is right. In the minds of many fans, the lasting image of Jose Aldo burned into their memory is him running face-first into the fist of the Notorious, falling as if poleaxed. The greatest featherweight in MMA history, lying helpless on the canvas as McGregor nailed his coffin with hammerfists. After nearly ten years of dominance, 18 wins in a row; after seeing off every contender he faced with almost scornful ease, it is this moment that will be the lasting memory in the minds of casual fans. As Rogan put it,

“Aldo’s legacy and his reign is always gonna be tarnished by that 13 seconds against McGregor. Which is so crazy because you take away that fight and he’s got one brutal war with Chad Mendes where he got rocked and stunned, which is a tough fight – the second one – great fight. And those are the only hard moments he’s had inside the octagon other than maybe round five against Ricardo Lamas.

It’s not fair, of course. Aldo’s legacy should be more- is more. But there are certain failures that, due to the weight of the moment and the sheer number of people watching, are impossible to erase completely from the collective memory of sports fans.

Michael Bisping, eating that thunderous H-bomb at UFC 100.

Roberto Duran, quitting after round eight with the infamous “no mas.”

George Foreman, hitting the canvas after eight rounds of looking more and more frustrated by Ali’s rope-a-dope.

Forrest Griffin, getting clowned and downed by a dancing Anderson Silva.

Anderson Silva, clowning and eating that left hook from a pissed-off Chris Weidman.

Daniel Cormier, getting outwrestled, big brothered, and DMX chopped by a derisive Jon Jones, after fading down the stretch in a brutal war of attrition.

Conor McGregor himself, getting rocked and choked out by Nate Diaz at UFC 196.

Sometimes, there is a measure of redemption to be had. Michael Bisping went on to knock out Luke Rockhold and win the Middleweight belt. He still managed to get knocked down by a very old Dan Henderson again, somehow, in Henderson’s last career bout, in a decision victory. George Foreman would return years later and expunge his demons with a rare late career resurgence. Roberto Duran went on to win titles later on in his storied career. Daniel Cormier gets his long-awaited second chance at Jones later this summer.

Of all the roads to redemption, Conor McGregor took the most direct, earning some of that shine back by rematching the younger Diaz immediately. McGregor fans could feel some of the bitter taste dissipating, replaced by five incredible rounds of Fight of the Year action. McGregor got his hand raised, his career back on track, and would go on to capture a historic second world title just months later.

But for Aldo, that route is not available, and is unlikely to ever become so. Aldo finds himself in the unique position of regaining the belt, but not against McGregor. In truth, for the masses, only a rematch with the Irishman would do it for Aldo. Cormier found that out the hard way, somehow becoming the villain in fan’s eyes opposite the walking PR disaster that is Jon Jones, because their first fight left us with such intense disappointment. Beating Gustafsson in an incredible war of resilience and breaking the frightening figure of Anthony Johnson, twice, did nothing for Cormier’s legitimacy in the eyes of fans. However, for DC, there is still hope. He has a rematch lined up, and, provided it holds, the opportunity to even the score.

Jose Aldo isn’t getting that, ever. McGregor has nothing to gain by reprising a contest he won in thirteen seconds, back in 2015, in a weight class he doesn’t compete in any more. Aldo could defeat Max Holloway this weekend, and Frankie Edgar another four times, and to the casual fan, the only response would be “13 seconds”.

Aldo’s greatest fight to date, a five round war against Chad Mendes.


Insomnia

Good graphic here to illustrate size differences among UFC champions

Al Iaquinta getting his head moving in training. The rhythm is hypnotic.

Playing around in the shed

A post shared by Al Iaquinta (@aliaquinta) on

A reminder to follow Derrick Lewis on Instagram, because he is constantly posting the latest thing he happens to find funny. He fights Mark Hunt on June 10th

Spinal

A post shared by Derrick Lewis (@thebeastufc) on

Also, he reps Houston, my city of residence.

One of the most graphic moments in MMA history. RIP, Kimbo Slice.

- May31.2008 Kimbo Slice lands a right hook against James Thompson, that causes his ear to explode on national television

A post shared by MMA History Today (@mmahistorytoday) on

A look inside American Top Team’s gym.

What the… I have no words for this email, but it definitely fulfills the “weird” promise of Midnight Mania

For reference, Mercedes Terrell, the witch:

This guy stealing a view off a different ring girl…


Slips, Rips, Knockout Clips

Tommy Hearns was the man

Ouch


Podcasts and Video

The UFC on Fox crew preview UFC 212

Holloway talks his upcoming fight


Random Land

You want to get angry? Watch the cops screw with Tiger Woods for 90 needless minutes

Stay woke, Maniacs!

MMAmania.com – All Posts

Midnight Mania! Is Joe Rogan right about Jose Aldo’s legacy?

Bringing you the weird and wild from the world of MMA each and every weeknight

Welcome to Midnight Mania! Tonight we’ve got a discussion on Jose Aldo, Al Iaquinta training, Derrick Lewis being himself, a memory of Kimbo Slice, a ring girl accused of witchcraft, knockouts, podcasts, and much more.


The Longest 13 Seconds in History

Joe Rogan is right. In the minds of many fans, the lasting image of Jose Aldo burned into their memory is him running face-first into the fist of the Notorious, falling as if poleaxed. Lying helpless on the canvas as McGregor nailed his coffin with hammerfists. After ten years of dominance, after seeing off every contender he faced with almost scornful ease, it is this moment that will be the lasting memory in the minds of casual fans. As Rogan put it,

“Aldo’s legacy and his reign is always gonna be tarnished by that 13 seconds against McGregor. Which is so crazy because you take away that fight and he’s got one brutal war with Chad Mendeswhere he got rocked and stunned, which is a tough fight – the second one – great fight. And those are the only hard moments he’s had inside the octagon other than maybe round five against Ricardo Lamas.

It’s not fair, of course. Aldo’s legacy should be more- is more. But there are certain moments that, due to the weight of the moment and the sheer number of people watching, are impossible to erase completely from the collective memory of sports fans.

Michael Bisping, eating that thunderous H-bomb at UFC 100.

Roberto Duran, quitting on his stool with the infamous “no mas.”

George Foreman, hitting the canvas after six rounds of looking more and more frustrated by Ali’s rope-a-dope.

Forrest Griffin, getting clowned and downed by a dancing Anderson Silva.

Anderson Silva, clowning and eating that left hook from a pissed-off Chris Weidman.

Daniel Cormier, getting outwrestled, big brothered, and DMX chopped by a derisive Jon Jones, after fading down the stretch in a brutal war of attrition.

Conor McGregor himself, getting rocked and choked out by Nate Diaz at UFC 196.

Sometimes, there is a measure of redemption to be had. Michael Bisping went on to knock out Luke Rockhold and win the Middleweight belt. He still managed to get knocked down by a very old Dan Henderson again, somehow, in Henderson’s last career bout, in a decision victory. George Foreman would return years later and expunge his demons with a rare late career resurgence. Roberto Duran went on to win titles later on in his storied career. Daniel Cormier gets his long-awaited second chance at Jones later this summer.

Of all the roads to redemption, Conor McGregor took the most direct, earning some of that shine back by rematching the younger Diaz immediately. McGregor fans could feel some of the bitter taste dissipating, replaced by five incredible rounds of Fight of the Year action. McGregor got his hand raised, his career back on track, and would go on to capture a historic second world title just months later.

But for Aldo, that route is not available, and is unlikely to ever become so. Aldo finds himself in the unique position of regaining the belt, but not against McGregor. In truth, for the masses, only a rematch with the Irishman would do it for Aldo. Cormier found that out the hard way, somehow becoming the villain in fan’s eyes opposite the walking PR disaster that is Jon Jones, because their first fight left us with such intense disappointment. Beating Gustafsson in an incredible war of resilience and breaking the frightening figure of Anthony Johnson, twice, did nothing for Cormier’s legitimacy in the eyes of fans. However, for DC, there is still hope. He has a rematch lined up, and, provided it holds, the opportunity to even the score.

Jose Aldo isn’t getting that, ever. McGregor has nothing to gain by reprising a contest he won in thirteen seconds, back in 2015, in a weight class he doesn’t compete in any more. Aldo could defeat Max Holloway this weekend, and Frankie Edgar another four times, and to the casual fan, the only response would be “13 seconds”.

Aldo’s greatest fight to date, a five round war against Chad Mendes.


Insomnia

Good graphic here to illustrate size differences among UFC champions

Al Iaquinta getting his head moving in training. The rhythm is hypnotic.

Playing around in the shed

A post shared by Al Iaquinta (@aliaquinta) on

A reminder to follow Derrick Lewis on Instagram, because he is constantly posting the latest thing he happens to find funny. He fights Mark Hunt on June 10th

Spinal

A post shared by Derrick Lewis (@thebeastufc) on

Also, he reps Houston, my city of residence.

One of the most graphic moments in MMA history. RIP, Kimbo Slice.

- May31.2008 Kimbo Slice lands a right hook against James Thompson, that causes his ear to explode on national television

A post shared by MMA History Today (@mmahistorytoday) on

A look inside American Top Team’s gym.

What the… I have no words for this email, but it definitely fulfills the “weird” promise of Midnight Mania

For reference, Mercedes Terrell, the witch:

This guy stealing a view off a different ring girl…


Slips, Rips, Knockout Clips

Tommy Hearns was the man

Ouch


Podcasts and Video

The UFC on Fox crew preview UFC 212

Holloway talks his upcoming fight


Random Land

You want to get angry? Watch the cops screw with Tiger Woods for 90 needless minutes

Stay woke, Maniacs!

MMAmania.com – All Posts