Tag Archive for Late

RECAP! Iaquinta Picks Apart Lee Late!

Ultimate Fighting Championship (UFC) Lightweight rivals Al Iaquinta and Kevin Lee rematched last night (Dec. 15, 2018) at UFC on FOX 31 from inside Fiserv Forum in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

Iaquinta returned from a two-year layoff to knock out Diego Sanchez and get dominated by Khabib Nurmagomedov. That’s perhaps the widest competition level disparity between two consecutive fights ever, which leaves Iaquinta in this odd position where no one really knows how good he is. Alternatively, Lee has proven himself repeatedly in the last year or so, winning some big fights and putting forth a strong effort opposite Tony Ferguson in a interim lightweight title shot. For Lee, this fight was all about smashing his opponent and making his case for another opportunity at gold.

Iaquinta opened the fight feinting toward the single leg, looking to fire off punches after touching the leg. In one nice exchange, Iaquinta spun into an elbow after touching the lead leg. As the two settled into the fight, however, Lee began to operate as a Southpaw more often: a wise choice from “The MoTown Phenom.” Lee did not bother to attempt a takedown in the first, as he was too busy picking at Lee with long straights. In addition, the left kick was landing well from Lee.

Iaquinta landed some nice counters along the way and made it close. Despite Lee’s range advantage, Iaquinta managed to slip and fire his right with some consistency.

Lee kickboxed from Southpaw for the first minute on the second round before remembering that he’s an elite wrestler. Immediately, Lee wrapped the New Yorker in a body lock and forcibly muscled his foe to the mat. Moving into back mount, Lee secured a body triangle and whacked away for a couple minutes.

Miraculously, Iaquinta managed to slip away from Lee’s best position, escaping back to his feet. Lee seemed a bit foot slow from holding the triangle for so long, allowing Iaquinta to land some good body shots and a hard right hand or two before the bell.

It was Lee’s round, but escaping the back mount was a great moment for Iaquinta.

The third round began with more kickboxing, and Iaquinta looked the sharper man. Lee worked his jab and long straight, but Iaquinta finally had a true read on his timing, allowing him to slip and rip with the right hand repeatedly. Nothing too devastating landed from either man, which made Lee’s takedown in the second half of the round rather important. Once more, Lee moved quickly into the back mount, but this time he was able to maintain control until the end of the round.

To Iaquinta’s credit, he did a much better job of fighting hands and denying both major damage and the submission than any of Lee’s past foes.

Iaquinta came out looking for his overhand in the fourth round, and he found it two-to-three times in the opening minute. Lee did his best to keep a poker face, but he was on wobbly legs and backing away from exchanges. At one point, Iaquinta also landed a clean, slapping right high kick across the jaw. Oddly, Lee largely decided to back away and shift side-to-side while recovering instead of shooting for a takedown, a strange decision considering how well Lee did whenever he actually wrestled. Lee recovered a bit by the end of the round to land, but he never did attempt a takedown in the fourth.

As a result, Iaquinta picked him apart for most of the five minutes.

Lee remembered his wrestling not long into the fifth. He took a bad single leg shot and scrambled for a while, nearly securing the shot after a bad entry. However, Iaquinta ultimately managed to deny the takedown, putting the two back in the center with two minutes left on the clock. Not long after, Iaquinta landed a hard left uppercut that stunned Lee, although the younger man answered back with some hard straight counters. Iaquinta continued forward undeterred and landed a dozen right hands in the final minute, really forcing Lee to his back foot and keeping him uncomfortable. Once more, a dominant round from the New Yorker.

Ultimately, all three judges awarded Al Iaquinta the decision victory.

Iaquinta did everything he had to do here. He found the timing on his right hand and then threw it frequently, a difficult task when you consider the level of wrestler he was facing. Speaking of, Iaquinta did a fantastic job of staying low before firing the power punch and targeting the body — a pair of factors that make shooting more difficult.

In addition, Iaquinta held up tremendously well over five rounds. He ate some hard shots throughout and pushed a solid pace, but never once did he back off or really need time to recover. When he pushed ahead of Lee, he stayed ahead.

With this win, Iaquinta proves himself a true top Lightweight and deserves another big fight next. How about a brawl with Justin Gaethje?

As great a performance this was from Iaquinta, it was an equally bad one from Lee, who really failed to make the most of his skill set. In the first three rounds, Lee had zero difficulty taking Iaquinta down whenever he actually chose to wrestle. Seeing as he was banking on winning those early rounds, doesn’t it seem advisable to score those takedowns while fresh? Instead, Lee spent the entire first round striking, and the round turned out to be the deciding five minutes.

Beyond that, Lee simply looked off. He never looked all that comfortable or confident; it looked like Lee was forcing a lot of his punches. I don’t know if his weight cut was particularly harsh, if there was another issue, or if Al Iaquinta is simply that good. Even in a different losing performance, Lee looked much sharper on his feet against Tony Ferguson.

Lee needs to head back to the drawing board.

Last night, Al Iaquinta overcame the odds to out-work Kevin Lee. Who should Iaquinta face next?

For complete UFC on FOX 31 ‘Iaquinta vs. Lee 2’ results and play-by-play, click HERE!

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RECAP! Iaquinta Picks Apart Lee Late!

Ultimate Fighting Championship (UFC) Lightweight rivals Al Iaquinta and Kevin Lee rematched last night (Dec. 15, 2018) at UFC on FOX 31 from inside Fiserv Forum in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

Iaquinta returned from a two-year layoff to knock out Diego Sanchez and get dominated by Khabib Nurmagomedov. That’s perhaps the widest competition level disparity between two consecutive fights ever, which leaves Iaquinta in this odd position where no one really knows how good he is. Alternatively, Lee has proven himself repeatedly in the last year or so, winning some big fights and putting forth a strong effort opposite Tony Ferguson in a interim lightweight title shot. For Lee, this fight was all about smashing his opponent and making his case for another opportunity at gold.

Iaquinta opened the fight feinting toward the single leg, looking to fire off punches after touching the leg. In one nice exchange, Iaquinta spun into an elbow after touching the lead leg. As the two settled into the fight, however, Lee began to operate as a Southpaw more often: a wise choice from “The MoTown Phenom.” Lee did not bother to attempt a takedown in the first, as he was too busy picking at Lee with long straights. In addition, the left kick was landing well from Lee.

Iaquinta landed some nice counters along the way and made it close. Despite Lee’s range advantage, Iaquinta managed to slip and fire his right with some consistency.

Lee kickboxed from Southpaw for the first minute on the second round before remembering that he’s an elite wrestler. Immediately, Lee wrapped the New Yorker in a body lock and forcibly muscled his foe to the mat. Moving into back mount, Lee secured a body triangle and whacked away for a couple minutes.

Miraculously, Iaquinta managed to slip away from Lee’s best position, escaping back to his feet. Lee seemed a bit foot slow from holding the triangle for so long, allowing Iaquinta to land some good body shots and a hard right hand or two before the bell.

It was Lee’s round, but escaping the back mount was a great moment for Iaquinta.

The third round began with more kickboxing, and Iaquinta looked the sharper man. Lee worked his jab and long straight, but Iaquinta finally had a true read on his timing, allowing him to slip and rip with the right hand repeatedly. Nothing too devastating landed from either man, which made Lee’s takedown in the second half of the round rather important. Once more, Lee moved quickly into the back mount, but this time he was able to maintain control until the end of the round.

To Iaquinta’s credit, he did a much better job of fighting hands and denying both major damage and the submission than any of Lee’s past foes.

Iaquinta came out looking for his overhand in the fourth round, and he found it two-to-three times in the opening minute. Lee did his best to keep a poker face, but he was on wobbly legs and backing away from exchanges. At one point, Iaquinta also landed a clean, slapping right high kick across the jaw. Oddly, Lee largely decided to back away and shift side-to-side while recovering instead of shooting for a takedown, a strange decision considering how well Lee did whenever he actually wrestled. Lee recovered a bit by the end of the round to land, but he never did attempt a takedown in the fourth.

As a result, Iaquinta picked him apart for most of the five minutes.

Lee remembered his wrestling not long into the fifth. He took a bad single leg shot and scrambled for a while, nearly securing the shot after a bad entry. However, Iaquinta ultimately managed to deny the takedown, putting the two back in the center with two minutes left on the clock. Not long after, Iaquinta landed a hard left uppercut that stunned Lee, although the younger man answered back with some hard straight counters. Iaquinta continued forward undeterred and landed a dozen right hands in the final minute, really forcing Lee to his back foot and keeping him uncomfortable. Once more, a dominant round from the New Yorker.

Ultimately, all three judges awarded Al Iaquinta the decision victory.

Iaquinta did everything he had to do here. He found the timing on his right hand and then threw it frequently, a difficult task when you consider the level of wrestler he was facing. Speaking of, Iaquinta did a fantastic job of staying low before firing the power punch and targeting the body — a pair of factors that make shooting more difficult.

In addition, Iaquinta held up tremendously well over five rounds. He ate some hard shots throughout and pushed a solid pace, but never once did he back off or really need time to recover. When he pushed ahead of Lee, he stayed ahead.

With this win, Iaquinta proves himself a true top Lightweight and deserves another big fight next. How about a brawl with Justin Gaethje?

As great a performance this was from Iaquinta, it was an equally bad one from Lee, who really failed to make the most of his skill set. In the first three rounds, Lee had zero difficulty taking Iaquinta down whenever he actually chose to wrestle. Seeing as he was banking on winning those early rounds, doesn’t it seem advisable to score those takedowns while fresh? Instead, Lee spent the entire first round striking, and the round turned out to be the deciding five minutes.

Beyond that, Lee simply looked off. He never looked all that comfortable or confident; it looked like Lee was forcing a lot of his punches. I don’t know if his weight cut was particularly harsh, if there was another issue, or if Al Iaquinta is simply that good. Even in a different losing performance, Lee looked much sharper on his feet against Tony Ferguson.

Lee needs to head back to the drawing board.

Last night, Al Iaquinta overcame the odds to out-work Kevin Lee. Who should Iaquinta face next?

For complete UFC on FOX 31 ‘Iaquinta vs. Lee 2’ results and play-by-play, click HERE!

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Highlights! Watch ‘Shogun’ Score Late TKO At UFC Adelaide

Mauricio “Shogun” Rua turned back the clock last night (Sat., Dec. 1, 2018) at UFC Fight Night 142 live on FOX Sports 1 from inside Adelaide Entertainment Centre in Adelaide, Australia, when he finished Australian contender Tyson Pedro via third-round TKO.

In typical “Shogun” fashion, the Brazilian veteran had to stomach significant damage in the first two rounds to come alive in the third. But after an apparent knee injury forced Pedro to fall to the canvas, Rua jumped on top and landed vicious ground-and-pound. Pedro tried to survive but the referee had to step in.

Check out the memorable finish above courtesy of UFC.

With this performance, Rua gets back in the light heavyweight win column after losing his last Octagon appearance against the resurgent Anthony Smith. The 37-year-old veteran isn’t quite what he used to be, but his chin is still holding up and “Shogun” is still finding ways to finish fights in exciting fashion.

For complete UFC Adelaide results and coverage click here.

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Jake Ellenberger Knows He’s Not Done Fighting, Targeting Late August Return

When Jake Ellenberger first appeared in the Ultimate Fighting Championship back in 2009, the then-newcomer nearly took out established welterweight Carlos Condit in his Octagon debut.
Recent News on Sherdog.com

Jake Ellenberger Knows He’s Not Done Fighting, Targeting Late August Return

When Jake Ellenberger first appeared in the Ultimate Fighting Championship back in 2009, the then-newcomer nearly took out established welterweight Carlos Condit in his Octagon debut.
Recent News on Sherdog.com

Jake Ellenberger Knows He’s Not Done Fighting, Targeting Late August Return

When Jake Ellenberger first appeared in the Ultimate Fighting Championship back in 2009, the then-newcomer nearly took out established welterweight Carlos Condit in his Octagon debut.
Recent News on Sherdog.com

Dominick Cruz Targets Late 2018 Bout after Lengthy Recovery from Broken Arm

Former Ultimate Fighting Championship bantamweight champion Dominick Cruz is hopeful he’ll be ready to fight again at the end of year after another injury setback.
Recent News on Sherdog.com

Midnight Mania! Dana Claims ‘Majority of Fighters’ Want Late Weigh-ins

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Welcome to Midnight Mania!

After today’s near-fiasco with Yoel Romero at the scale — in which he missed by just .2 pounds, looked like utter death, and after long uncertainty agreed to a non-title bout with Robert Whittaker— Dana White is eager to go through with the decision to move weigh-ins back to the old afternoon times.

It can’t happen fast enough. Yes, we are moving towards the old weigh-in system. It’s gonna happen. There are a couple people out there that say, “no no no”, but the majority of the fighters want to go back to 4 o’clock.

He also shot down any talk of a hybrid system, saying there was no way to get the commission to show up twice. He also said he doesn’t know many fighters who are morning people, saying they like to sleep in late. He acknowledged that Eddie Alvarez has a point, but claimed a lot of fighters are asking him to move the weigh-ins.

We never had a problem with 4 o’clock. Everybody was healthy, everybody was fine.

It’s possible that numerous fighters have indeed expressed that they want the weigh-ins moved back to the old time, but that’s certainly NOT been the prevailing mood on social media, where fighters like Alvarez, Gaethje, Iaquinta, Elias Theodorou, and Chas Skelly all prefer the earlier time. They also suggested extending the weigh-in window, as Jeff Novitsky said the UFC was attempting to do in 2016; White has evidently concluded this is not feasible. However, without any representative body like an association or a union to speak for the fighters and negotiate, perhaps even collectively, on their behalf, Dana is free to make these claims and decisions uncontested.


Insomnia

This clip put me through so many emotions in such a short time

Jonny Bones is now actively rooting against his college roommate for saying he’s been doing PEDs since then.

If Jon Jones finds you an impressive liar, that’s an interim title belt in and of itself. He would know.

The dog should have known not to run up on this ancient reptilian monster.

Nature man

A post shared by Till (@darrentill2) on

I’m not sure exactly what happened here but I wouldn’t want to try to break these two up.

So true; rolling with a black belt feels like trying to stop Thanos: impossible from the start.

l I mean, not even close

A post shared by Because jitsu (@because_jitsu) on

Yoel Romero is breaking records at UFC 225 already

This is 100% not getting enforced


Slips. Rips. KO Clips.

Sometimes the whole fight hinges on being on the right side of this kind of throw:

Just keep throwing, just keep throwing…

Pink hair for the win

That up-elbow is nice

hook-cross

Remembering the weird and wonderful Buggy Choke

Take some time today to reminisce.


Podcasts and Video

Robert Whittaker is an incredibly impressive defensive wrestler. Follow MMA Mania on Youtube

UFC 225 pre-fight show

Heavy Hands

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Midnight Mania! Al Iaquinta Eyeing Late Summer Tango With Justin Gaethje

Bringing you the weird and wild from the world of MMA each and every weeknight

Welcome to Midnight Mania!

It’s hard to make a bad fight at lightweight. The UFC’s deepest division is brimming with scintillating talent- even the guys coming off losses are easy to get excited about. No two fighters represent that more than Justin Gaethje and ‘Raging’ Al Iaquinta. On his podcast, Iaquinta hinted that he might be in talks with the UFC to face Gaethje this summer. He was asked about a possible matchup with Gaethje, and his response indicated that the idea was not new to him. Transcript via MMAJunkie.com:

“We’re hoping for sometime in August,” Iaquinta said. “August, September. I think (the UFC) wanted it to be sooner, but that guy needs a rest. I was looking out for his health with that one. He needs a break for a minute. If it goes down the way it’s supposed to, it’ll be a good fight, a tough fight.”

It’s peak Al to say that he’s looking out for Gaethje’s health by pushing a potential matchup back to late summer. But is the fight actually being discussed? “Little bit”, was all Al would say.

It would be a near-perfect matchup for Gaethje, and one fans would have an easy time getting behind. Iaquinta had won five straight before his high-profile decision loss to Khabib Nurmagomedov; Gaethje is on the most exciting two-fight skid in UFC history, coming agonizingly close to beating Dustin Poirier and Eddie Alvarez before going out on his shield in both fights. He needs a step back, but not too far back; someone that keeps him relevant with a win, and doesn’t consign him to the dust-bin with a loss. Iaquinta is in a similar space; his short-notice loss to Nurmagomedov may have dampened any title hopes, but he hung tough with the Russian for all five rounds. Both men are known for wanting to throw hands in the pocket in a fan-friendly manner; neither are known for meticulous risk avoidance.

Of course, it’s hard to make a bad fight at lightweight; Edson Barboza’s manager has also thrown his hat in the ring for a fight with Gaethje.


Insomnia

Speaking of lightweight, Tony Ferguson is back in training

The guy on the left is your hopes, dreams and ambitions. On the right is you.

Muhammad Ali was an inspiration to so many

Joe Rogan loves highlighting very ineffective traditional martial arts techniques.

Jose Aldo has really been working his wrestling lately ahead of his summer fight with Jeremy Stephens


Slips, Rips, KO Clips

Some Muay Thai action

This guy looks like a solid addition to the UFC roster. Look at that combination. By God.


Quick Hits and Good Reads


Podcasts and Video

Follow MMA Mania on Youtube

UFC Chile post-fight show


Random Land

So close

Say what you will about Trump, he’s the funniest president we have ever had and likely will ever have.

Look at this crazy volcano footage from Hawaii

Stay woke, Maniacs! Follow me on Twitter and Facebook @Vorpality

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UFC 216 free fight video: Watch Derrick Lewis score late finish over Viktor Pesta in Houston

Proven UFC heavyweight knockout artist Derrick Lewis will try to right the divisional ship at UFC 216 on Oct. 7 live on pay-per-view (PPV) from inside T-Mobile Arena in Las Vegas, Nevada, when he takes on former divisional champion Fabricio Werdum. Lewis will be making his first appearance since getting stopped by Mark Hunt via fourth-round TKO back in June.

In preparation for Lewis’ return to the Octagon, UFC has opened up its vault and released footage of “Black Beast” destroying heavyweight prospect Viktor Pesta at UFC 192 in 2015. The action spilled over into Lewis’ own backyard of Houston, Texas, as the heavyweight knockout artist battled Pesta for two strong rounds before putting an end to “Takedown Machine” via third-round TKO.

The memorable stoppage, which sparked a six-fight win streak for Lewis, can be seen above courtesy of UFC.

Lewis will have to rely on this sort of knockout ability at UFC 216 if he wishes to get past the veteran experience and overall elite skill of Werdum. The fact that the heavyweight clash will be contested over the course of three rounds bodes well for “Black Beast” and his chances of finishing the fight late.

For complete UFC 216 fight card news click here.

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