Tag Archive for getting

Alexander Gustafsson’s Team Isn’t Cool With Jon Jones Getting a Free Drug Pass

He may be a champ, but he’s a total screw up, so for Jon Jones‘ return to action at UFC 232, the UFC had to be cool with trace amounts of steroids in his system. They also had to find a commission that was cool with that, so the entire event was moved from Las Vegas to California the week of the show.

Jones’ opponent on that night, Alexander Gustafsson, was seemingly cool with it, too. But with the news that Jones STILL has those drugs in him, that whole thing is wearing thin on Gustafsson and his team.

Here’s a statement sent to MMAFighting:

“The inconclusive and inconsistent results that are repeatedly occurring with Jon Jones, at the very least, should compel our industry to have a greater, deeper, and more impartial discussion about the legitimacy of Jon’s defense. Jon has gone out publicly boasting when some of his results come back negative. However, he remains silent when his test results come back positive. You can not have it both ways and cherry-pick the results that are favorable for you, and insist that we disregard the results that go against your interests.

“Jon has essentially received a use exemption on a strict liability violation. The science is not certain on the defense he has taken. Furthermore, science is always in a state of change. So the science we rely on today is different than the science we relied on from just a few years ago. It will probably change again going forward. Jones is also creating a precedent that will go beyond his personal interests in the sense that now other fighters will also seek use exemptions on a strict liability violation based on an issue that the science community is still divided on. It’s an absolute mess.”

In case you didn’t go to law school, allow me to explain this “strict liability” thing. When it comes to determining negligence, you try to iron out how much fault a person should bear for whatever action they’re accused of. But when the term strict liability comes into play, then it’s just a question of “Did it happen? Well, then homeboy is liable.” In other words, if there’s any steroids in Jon Jones, he’s guilty of doing steroids. End of story.

My mind still sees this steroid thing as a strict liability issue. I guess I’m old school.

The post Alexander Gustafsson’s Team Isn’t Cool With Jon Jones Getting a Free Drug Pass appeared first on Caged Insider.

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Alexander Gustafsson’s Team Isn’t Cool With Jon Jones Getting a Free Drug Pass

He may be a champ, but he’s a total screw up, so for Jon Jones‘ return to action at UFC 232, the UFC had to be cool with trace amounts of steroids in his system. They also had to find a commission that was cool with that, so the entire event was moved from Las Vegas to California the week of the show.

Jones’ opponent on that night, Alexander Gustafsson, was seemingly cool with it, too. But with the news that Jones STILL has those drugs in him, that whole thing is wearing thin on Gustafsson and his team.

Here’s a statement sent to MMAFighting:

“The inconclusive and inconsistent results that are repeatedly occurring with Jon Jones, at the very least, should compel our industry to have a greater, deeper, and more impartial discussion about the legitimacy of Jon’s defense. Jon has gone out publicly boasting when some of his results come back negative. However, he remains silent when his test results come back positive. You can not have it both ways and cherry-pick the results that are favorable for you, and insist that we disregard the results that go against your interests.

“Jon has essentially received a use exemption on a strict liability violation. The science is not certain on the defense he has taken. Furthermore, science is always in a state of change. So the science we rely on today is different than the science we relied on from just a few years ago. It will probably change again going forward. Jones is also creating a precedent that will go beyond his personal interests in the sense that now other fighters will also seek use exemptions on a strict liability violation based on an issue that the science community is still divided on. It’s an absolute mess.”

In case you didn’t go to law school, allow me to explain this “strict liability” thing. When it comes to determining negligence, you try to iron out how much fault a person should bear for whatever action they’re accused of. But when the term strict liability comes into play, then it’s just a question of “Did it happen? Well, then homeboy is liable.” In other words, if there’s any steroids in Jon Jones, he’s guilty of doing steroids. End of story.

My mind still sees this steroid thing as a strict liability issue. I guess I’m old school.

The post Alexander Gustafsson’s Team Isn’t Cool With Jon Jones Getting a Free Drug Pass appeared first on Caged Insider.

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Alexander Gustafsson’s Team Isn’t Cool With Jon Jones Getting a Free Drug Pass

He may be a champ, but he’s a total screw up, so for Jon Jones‘ return to action at UFC 232, the UFC had to be cool with trace amounts of steroids in his system. They also had to find a commission that was cool with that, so the entire event was moved from Las Vegas to California the week of the show.

Jones’ opponent on that night, Alexander Gustafsson, was seemingly cool with it, too. But with the news that Jones STILL has those drugs in him, that whole thing is wearing thin on Gustafsson and his team.

Here’s a statement sent to MMAFighting:

“The inconclusive and inconsistent results that are repeatedly occurring with Jon Jones, at the very least, should compel our industry to have a greater, deeper, and more impartial discussion about the legitimacy of Jon’s defense. Jon has gone out publicly boasting when some of his results come back negative. However, he remains silent when his test results come back positive. You can not have it both ways and cherry-pick the results that are favorable for you, and insist that we disregard the results that go against your interests.

“Jon has essentially received a use exemption on a strict liability violation. The science is not certain on the defense he has taken. Furthermore, science is always in a state of change. So the science we rely on today is different than the science we relied on from just a few years ago. It will probably change again going forward. Jones is also creating a precedent that will go beyond his personal interests in the sense that now other fighters will also seek use exemptions on a strict liability violation based on an issue that the science community is still divided on. It’s an absolute mess.”

In case you didn’t go to law school, allow me to explain this “strict liability” thing. When it comes to determining negligence, you try to iron out how much fault a person should bear for whatever action they’re accused of. But when the term strict liability comes into play, then it’s just a question of “Did it happen? Well, then homeboy is liable.” In other words, if there’s any steroids in Jon Jones, he’s guilty of doing steroids. End of story.

My mind still sees this steroid thing as a strict liability issue. I guess I’m old school.

The post Alexander Gustafsson’s Team Isn’t Cool With Jon Jones Getting a Free Drug Pass appeared first on Caged Insider.

Caged Insider

Alexander Gustafsson’s Team Isn’t Cool With Jon Jones Getting a Free Drug Pass

He may be a champ, but he’s a total screw up, so for Jon Jones‘ return to action at UFC 232, the UFC had to be cool with trace amounts of steroids in his system. They also had to find a commission that was cool with that, so the entire event was moved from Las Vegas to California the week of the show.

Jones’ opponent on that night, Alexander Gustafsson, was seemingly cool with it, too. But with the news that Jones STILL has those drugs in him, that whole thing is wearing thin on Gustafsson and his team.

Here’s a statement sent to MMAFighting:

“The inconclusive and inconsistent results that are repeatedly occurring with Jon Jones, at the very least, should compel our industry to have a greater, deeper, and more impartial discussion about the legitimacy of Jon’s defense. Jon has gone out publicly boasting when some of his results come back negative. However, he remains silent when his test results come back positive. You can not have it both ways and cherry-pick the results that are favorable for you, and insist that we disregard the results that go against your interests.

“Jon has essentially received a use exemption on a strict liability violation. The science is not certain on the defense he has taken. Furthermore, science is always in a state of change. So the science we rely on today is different than the science we relied on from just a few years ago. It will probably change again going forward. Jones is also creating a precedent that will go beyond his personal interests in the sense that now other fighters will also seek use exemptions on a strict liability violation based on an issue that the science community is still divided on. It’s an absolute mess.”

In case you didn’t go to law school, allow me to explain this “strict liability” thing. When it comes to determining negligence, you try to iron out how much fault a person should bear for whatever action they’re accused of. But when the term strict liability comes into play, then it’s just a question of “Did it happen? Well, then homeboy is liable.” In other words, if there’s any steroids in Jon Jones, he’s guilty of doing steroids. End of story.

My mind still sees this steroid thing as a strict liability issue. I guess I’m old school.

The post Alexander Gustafsson’s Team Isn’t Cool With Jon Jones Getting a Free Drug Pass appeared first on Caged Insider.

Caged Insider

Alexander Gustafsson’s Team Isn’t Cool With Jon Jones Getting a Free Drug Pass

He may be a champ, but he’s a total screw up, so for Jon Jones‘ return to action at UFC 232, the UFC had to be cool with trace amounts of steroids in his system. They also had to find a commission that was cool with that, so the entire event was moved from Las Vegas to California the week of the show.

Jones’ opponent on that night, Alexander Gustafsson, was seemingly cool with it, too. But with the news that Jones STILL has those drugs in him, that whole thing is wearing thin on Gustafsson and his team.

Here’s a statement sent to MMAFighting:

“The inconclusive and inconsistent results that are repeatedly occurring with Jon Jones, at the very least, should compel our industry to have a greater, deeper, and more impartial discussion about the legitimacy of Jon’s defense. Jon has gone out publicly boasting when some of his results come back negative. However, he remains silent when his test results come back positive. You can not have it both ways and cherry-pick the results that are favorable for you, and insist that we disregard the results that go against your interests.

“Jon has essentially received a use exemption on a strict liability violation. The science is not certain on the defense he has taken. Furthermore, science is always in a state of change. So the science we rely on today is different than the science we relied on from just a few years ago. It will probably change again going forward. Jones is also creating a precedent that will go beyond his personal interests in the sense that now other fighters will also seek use exemptions on a strict liability violation based on an issue that the science community is still divided on. It’s an absolute mess.”

In case you didn’t go to law school, allow me to explain this “strict liability” thing. When it comes to determining negligence, you try to iron out how much fault a person should bear for whatever action they’re accused of. But when the term strict liability comes into play, then it’s just a question of “Did it happen? Well, then homeboy is liable.” In other words, if there’s any steroids in Jon Jones, he’s guilty of doing steroids. End of story.

My mind still sees this steroid thing as a strict liability issue. I guess I’m old school.

The post Alexander Gustafsson’s Team Isn’t Cool With Jon Jones Getting a Free Drug Pass appeared first on Caged Insider.

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Bisping: Is Jones Clean, Or Dirty And Getting Away With It?

Michael Bisping is glad to have Jon Jones back inside the Octagon.

Sure, “The Count” has been an outspoken critic of the reigning Ultimate Fighting Championship (UFC) light heavyweight champion, who reclaimed his crown at UFC 232 last month in Calif., but that is the price a fighter must pay when flunking multiple drug tests.

It’s like a fighter who habitually misses weight, the doubt will always be there.

But now that Jones has passed his UFC 232 drug tests, Bisping wants to know if the embattled pound-for-pound great is truly clean, or just dirty and getting away with it, thanks to so much about his case that is unknown, even by the supposed “experts.”

Like picograms and pulsing effects, for example.

“That was the narrative going into this fight: ‘Listen, this is remnants, it was leftover from whenever it was.’ But the point of the matter is that Jeff Novitzky was saying, everyone was saying this could be in his system for a long, long time and then, lo and behold, he tests clean,” Bisping said on his Believe You Me podcast (via MMA Fighting). “I’m glad he tested clean, I really am. I hope he continues to do so. I hope he stays clean. I don’t hope he passes his tests and gets away with it. They’re two very different things. I don’t hope he gets away with it. I hope he’s competing on a level playing field and we get to see the best Jon Jones that we can.”

He certainly looked like the best Jon Jones at UFC 232.

Jones returned from his UFC 214 disciplinary suspension last fall, only to once again test positive for trace amounts of Turinabol. The argument from UFC and its band of merry men was that “Bones” already served time for that exact substance and what was found — multiple times — was no different than finding Thanksgiving leftovers in your fridge.

Assuming you only open your fridge once a year.

As of this writing, Jones is scheduled to return to action — along with a battery of new drug testing protocols — at the UFC 235 pay-per-view (PPV) event in March, assuming Nevada State Athletic Commission (NSAC) buys his story about this battery of tests.

Time will tell.

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Midnight Mania! Novitzky Attempts To Explain Why Jones Isn’t Getting Preferential Treatment

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Jeff Novitsky attempted to refute comparisons between Frank Mir, Tom Lawlor and Jon Jones. Here’s the specific clip:

Its very consistent! Jon was sanctioned the first time it showed up in his system for fifteen months for what [arbitrator] McLaren ultimately determined was non-intentional use. So those out there saying that Jon got off scot-free… I mean, an independent arbitrator determined that he didn’t do anything on purpose. It was, however it got into his system, he still got fifteen months. Frank Mir, this wasn’t a second occasion where there was still remnants from the first time. He was sanctioned for strict liability, same with Tom Lawlor.

There are a couple issues with his response. The first one is that Mir alleges that he wanted USADA to test supplements from further back than six months and USADA told him that is ridiculous, contrary to what they are now saying with Jon Jones, where they have concluded, in a result that happens to financially benefit their partner the UFC, that Jones’ positive results 18 months after his first failed test are due to the metabolites remaining in his system. Novitsky doesn’t address that in the above clip. The single study he references, with one study participant (which, unless I’m mistaken, was the Russian doctor who was the subject of the excellent Netflix documentary Icarus), was in 2012, prior to Mir’s failed 2016 test, leaving that discrepancy in how the two cases were handled.

The second issue is the pulsing issue, which there isn’t enough information on to make the kind of call USADA opted to make in this case. Novitsky is really sticking to the argument that Jones is only testing positive because of ‘pulsing’. There is just no way to say with certainty- as Novitsky does- that the positive result is from the same ingestion. The research isn’t to that point. This isn’t the only claim Novitsky makes that is disputed, as he claims one cannot microdose with substances not endogenous to the body, which doesn’t seem to be the case.

Novitsky also says as a UFC employee, not one who works for USADA, he doesn’t know what substantial assistance Jones is providing, but it would be a good question for USADA.


Insomnia

Jon Jones just literally isn’t here for any tough questions. When confronted by reporter Aaron Bronsteter starting to ask him about preferential treatment, he just walked away. Later, he did apologize to Aaron, who explained that he hadn’t thought he was asking anything inappropriate.

Jon Jones has certainly earned the comparison in the last couple days

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#FakeNews

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Rampage had the best reaction to Jon Jones staring off past his opponent:

This could get interesting depending on what supplement companies the UFC chooses to back.

VADA is apparently taking it from here, thanks USADA.

Weird animation time:

Fighters had different reactions to the drug test results, but they seemed pretty consistently different from the conclusions the UFC, USADA and Jon Jones came to. Matt Brown concluded that the UFC should take one stance or the other.

Nate Diaz had one of the best reactions.

Eddie Alvarez’s stance is a little interesting considering he now fights in an organization that doesn’t do drug testing.

Ryan Hall doesn’t look like a professional fighter about to fight

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Ryan Hall is full of expressions at morning weigh-ins

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This antipathy towards tough reporting has been happening for a long time in the UFC. Dana White had an expletive-filled rant towards Loretta Hunt in 2009:

Regional fighter nicknames are always a gold mine.

TJ Dillashaw training his dynamic movements

Every so often someone rediscovers armwrestle fighting, and its always incredible to watch.

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Thoughts?

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Meanwhile in Japan…


Slips, Rips, KO Clips

The first weekend knockouts have already begun:

Sleep well, Maniacs! A better tomorrow is always possible. Follow me on Twitter and Facebook @Vorpality

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Bellator Double-Header Results: Fedor Is Old, Sonnen Is Old, Everyone Is Getting Old

This weekend brought us not one, but two (!) Bellator events, with Bellator 207 on Friday and Bellator 208 on Saturday. On Friday night, it was all about TUF winner Ryan Bader grinding out a win over TUF washout Matt Mitrione, while Saturday saw legendary Russian heavyweight Fedor Emelianenko move his old bones about the cage while taking on a creaky Chael Sonnen.

I guess you could say the overall theme of the weekend was, “Damn, all these got old.”

I mean, it was inevitable of course. Fedor was the best in the world back when the world was a struggling UFC and a captivating PRIDE FC. That was a long time ago. And Sonnen… Sonnen was relevant when he was giving Anderson Silva the fight of his life.

So yeah, it should’ve been expected, the ugliness that was Sonnen going for any takedown he could while Fedor wailed away. At one point, Sonnen had the Russian’s back, and inexplicably leaped off it and over the top, thereby giving Fedor a clear path to victory. But whatever. Old people do crazy things sometimes.

Fedor Emelianenko Chael Sonnen

Elsewhere on the Bellator 208 card, Chieck Kongo managed to somehow not knee anyone in the nuts and not get kneed in the nuts himself. He also won, knocking out Timothy Johnson in a little over a minute!

Former UFC champ Benson Henderson grappled the hell out of Saad Awad, earning a decision. Meanwhile, former champ Alexander Shlemenko… also old. Also sad.

At Bellator 207, Bader did exactly what he needed to do to avoid getting punched to death by Mitrione: he wrestle-humped him into oblivion.  I guess this means we’ll see Bader take on Fedor in the heavyweight grand prix finals, and Bader will furiously try to impregnate him.

Sergei Kharitonov did his thing against Roy Nelson – his thing being wail away until Nelson covered up and then fell down.

Hey, guess who’s too old and worn to be fighting? Roy Nelson.

The post Bellator Double-Header Results: Fedor Is Old, Sonnen Is Old, Everyone Is Getting Old appeared first on Caged Insider.

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Bellator Double-Header Results: Fedor Is Old, Sonnen Is Old, Everyone Is Getting Old

This weekend brought us not one, but two (!) Bellator events, with Bellator 207 on Friday and Bellator 208 on Saturday. On Friday night, it was all about TUF winner Ryan Bader grinding out a win over TUF washout Matt Mitrione, while Saturday saw legendary Russian heavyweight Fedor Emelianenko move his old bones about the cage while taking on a creaky Chael Sonnen.

I guess you could say the overall theme of the weekend was, “Damn, all these got old.”

I mean, it was inevitable of course. Fedor was the best in the world back when the world was a struggling UFC and a captivating PRIDE FC. That was a long time ago. And Sonnen… Sonnen was relevant when he was giving Anderson Silva the fight of his life.

So yeah, it should’ve been expected, the ugliness that was Sonnen going for any takedown he could while Fedor wailed away. At one point, Sonnen had the Russian’s back, and inexplicably leaped off it and over the top, thereby giving Fedor a clear path to victory. But whatever. Old people do crazy things sometimes.

Fedor Emelianenko Chael Sonnen

Elsewhere on the Bellator 208 card, Chieck Kongo managed to somehow not knee anyone in the nuts and not get kneed in the nuts himself. He also won, knocking out Timothy Johnson in a little over a minute!

Former UFC champ Benson Henderson grappled the hell out of Saad Awad, earning a decision. Meanwhile, former champ Alexander Shlemenko… also old. Also sad.

At Bellator 207, Bader did exactly what he needed to do to avoid getting punched to death by Mitrione: he wrestle-humped him into oblivion.  I guess this means we’ll see Bader take on Fedor in the heavyweight grand prix finals, and Bader will furiously try to impregnate him.

Sergei Kharitonov did his thing against Roy Nelson – his thing being wail away until Nelson covered up and then fell down.

Hey, guess who’s too old and worn to be fighting? Roy Nelson.

The post Bellator Double-Header Results: Fedor Is Old, Sonnen Is Old, Everyone Is Getting Old appeared first on Caged Insider.

Caged Insider

Bellator Double-Header Results: Fedor Is Old, Sonnen Is Old, Everyone Is Getting Old

This weekend brought us not one, but two (!) Bellator events, with Bellator 207 on Friday and Bellator 208 on Saturday. On Friday night, it was all about TUF winner Ryan Bader grinding out a win over TUF washout Matt Mitrione, while Saturday saw legendary Russian heavyweight Fedor Emelianenko move his old bones about the cage while taking on a creaky Chael Sonnen.

I guess you could say the overall theme of the weekend was, “Damn, all these got old.”

I mean, it was inevitable of course. Fedor was the best in the world back when the world was a struggling UFC and a captivating PRIDE FC. That was a long time ago. And Sonnen… Sonnen was relevant when he was giving Anderson Silva the fight of his life.

So yeah, it should’ve been expected, the ugliness that was Sonnen going for any takedown he could while Fedor wailed away. At one point, Sonnen had the Russian’s back, and inexplicably leaped off it and over the top, thereby giving Fedor a clear path to victory. But whatever. Old people do crazy things sometimes.

Fedor Emelianenko Chael Sonnen

Elsewhere on the Bellator 208 card, Chieck Kongo managed to somehow not knee anyone in the nuts and not get kneed in the nuts himself. He also won, knocking out Timothy Johnson in a little over a minute!

Former UFC champ Benson Henderson grappled the hell out of Saad Awad, earning a decision. Meanwhile, former champ Alexander Shlemenko… also old. Also sad.

At Bellator 207, Bader did exactly what he needed to do to avoid getting punched to death by Mitrione: he wrestle-humped him into oblivion.  I guess this means we’ll see Bader take on Fedor in the heavyweight grand prix finals, and Bader will furiously try to impregnate him.

Sergei Kharitonov did his thing against Roy Nelson – his thing being wail away until Nelson covered up and then fell down.

Hey, guess who’s too old and worn to be fighting? Roy Nelson.

The post Bellator Double-Header Results: Fedor Is Old, Sonnen Is Old, Everyone Is Getting Old appeared first on Caged Insider.

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