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‘TUF Nations’ Finale Bonuses: Poirier, Corassani, Noons, Jimmo Earn $50K Awards

Dustin Poirier, Akira Corassani, K.J. Noons and Ryan Jimmo each earned $ 50,000 in post-fight bonus money for their performances Wednesday night at “The Ultimate Fighter Nations” finale.
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Fortunes changed for five at TUF Nations Finale

Michael Bisping had long talked about not wanting to end his career as the guy with the most wins in UFC history to never get a title shot. After his loss to Tim Kennedy on Wednesday night, that is very likely how he’ll end up.

The last few days have once again shown that you never know what you’re going to get with a UFC show.
On Friday in Abu Dhabi, there were four first-round finishes in eight fights in a show that seemed to breeze by.  On Wednesday in Quebec City, Canada, there were nine fights that went to a decision, the third most in UFC history. Unlike Friday, a night filled with explosiveness, Wednesday felt like another night at the office.
It was the climax of an Ultimate Fighter season that nobody except the hardest of the hardcores was watching. There were only a few strong title contenders on the show, and all came through, except one.

Michael Bisping, in hyping his fight with Tim Kennedy, talked of Kennedy as a stepping stone for him to get that elusive title match that he’s come one fight from getting on three different occasions. Coming off a year layoff due to a detached retina in his right eye, and at 35, he didn’t look quite as quick or as sharp.
In the end, the difference in the fight was Tim Kennedy’s ability to not just get takedowns, but keep Bisping flat on his back in a way none of his previous opponents were ever able to do and take a unanimous decision on scores of 49-46, 49-46 and 50-45.
Given his age, and the depth in the middleweight division, the odds are now strong that Bisping will be exactly what he’s feared for a few years – the guy who ends his career with the most wins in UFC history of anyone who has never gotten a championship match. With the company running so many shows, and him being an established name who is good at promoting fights, he may still have a long tenure left, if that’s what he chooses. But it’s likely as the utility player, like the role Rich Franklin has had for many years. But Franklin had his day in the sun that Bisping is less likely than ever to get.

Here’s a look at how the Fortunes Changed for Five on the show:

TIM KENNEDY – As much as he was verbally beating himself up, Kennedy scored a strong win over the No. 5 ranked contender in his division. Most likely, the win will move Kennedy to the No. 6 spot on the contenders ladder, behind the injured Anderson Silva, Lyoto Machida, Vitor Belfort, Ronaldo “Jacare” Souza and Luke Rockhold.
Kennedy (18-4), has only lost twice, to Souza and Rockhold, both by five-round decisions in Strikeforce title fights, in the last six-plus years. When asked after the show what was next, he hinted he would start calling people out on Twitter in a few days. Kennedy said that the winner of the May 31 fight in Berlin, Germany, between Mark Munoz (13-4) and Gegard Mousasi (34-4-2) would be who he would want.
Munoz would be a new opponent, but Kennedy has more to gain looking at Belfort, Souza or Rockhold, because a win over any of the three could get him a title shot. A win over Munoz keeps him one step below contention.
MICHAEL BISPING – The loss changed Bisping’s fortunes in a serious way. His best case scenario would be to attempt to talk his way into a fight with Rockhold, provided Rockhold beats Tim Boetsch on April 26 in Baltimore. Last year, Bisping made a remark on television about getting the better of Rockhold when they had trained together. Rockhold didn’t take kindly to what he said, and indicated wanting to fight Bisping. Such a fight would probably be a television main event, keeping Bisping in the spotlight.
If not, he’s more likely to be facing another fighter coming off a loss, whether it be in the Rockhold vs. Boetsch or Munoz vs. Mousasi matches. But those fights for him would be all risk with no reward. Wins wouldn’t put him in the thick of things, and a second loss would put a real damper on his career going forward.
DUSTIN POIRIER – After Poirier (16-3) finished Akira Corassani in the second round by overwhelming him with punches, he made it clear that he wanted Cub Swanson next. Swanson faces Jeremy Stephens on June 28 in San Antonio, but if Swanson wins, he’s likely to get a featherweight title fight next.
Poirier, at 25, is already the winningest fighter in the short history of UFC’s featherweight division. He’s won eight of ten fights since early 2011, when the division was introduced. If Swanson isn’t available, a good opponent for him would be Clay Guida. Guida is a name fighter, coming off a win last Friday over Tatsuya Kawajiri. Poirier needs a major win for people to take him as a serious top-tier fighter.
K.J. NOONS - There was an interesting test case on Wednesday. One of the weird realities of the sport is its version of the nuclear arms race. Almost everybody drops ten to 20 pounds the last week of the fight, and then tries to put it back on after weigh-ins. The idea is that you don’t want to be physically smaller than your opponent in the cage, so the goal is to weigh far more than the weight class limitation at fight time. And since almost everyone does it, unless someone is incredibly talented, if they don’t, it risks them getting outmuscled.
That means almost everyone is miserable in the days leading up to the fight. It means they are putting their bodies through the grinder when they’d be better off resting. It also means, at least in theory, by taxing ones system just before fight time, that fighters will have just a little less stamina when it comes down to crunch time in their fights.
Noons and Sam Stout, both lightweights, bumped into each other a few days before fight time. Stout’s side suggested that they go to the UFC and ask if the fight could be made a welterweight fight. As it turned out, neither guy looked any different in the cage, but they were able to rest their bodies. In theory, they’d have more energy and be able to put on a better show. But it didn’t make a difference.
Noons knocked Stout out with a right to the jaw standing and a left on the ground in just 30 seconds.
“It’s an odd thing,” said Dana White about the request. ”It doesn’t happen a lot. I’m not opposed to it happening here, but it’s not a trend we want to start.”
SARAH KAUFMAN – Kaufman (17-2, 1 no contest), in a sense, avenged a win in outstriking Leslie Smith for three rounds. At an Invicta show one year ago, Kaufman got her hand raised via split decision over Smith in a fight many thought should have gone the other way. There was no questioning who won here.
Kaufman’s striking was both quicker and crisper throughout the fight. But she did have an edge, going through a full training camp while Smith took the fight just over a week ago, and the conditioning difference was noticeable late.
Kaufman, who has wins over both Miesha Tate and Liz Carmouche, is in a weird position. Because Ronda Rousey beat her in 54 seconds with an armbar in a Strikeforce title match, it’s going to be tough for her to get a title shot as long as Rousey is champion. With the decisive win, it would look like she could either face the winner of the Tate vs. Carmouche fight on Saturday, or face Sara McMann, coming off McMann’s loss to Rousey.

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TUF Nations Finale results: Tim Kennedy gets the best of Michael Bisping

Michael Bisping scored a decided victory in the trash talk department leading up to his TUF Nations Finale main event against Tim Kennedy.

Kennedy, though, walked the walk in the Octagon. The middleweight scored his biggest career victory Wednesday night, earning a unanimous decision victory after five rounds in Quebec City. The judges’ scores were 49-46, 49-46, and 50-45.

Bisping was fighting for the first time in just under a year due to surgery to repair a detached retina. In the opening round, he the longtime British standout simply looked like a rusty fighter, as Kennedy dominated him from bell to bell with superior wrestling and solid ground and pound.

In round two, Bisping found his footing. With the round contested mainly standing up, Bisping found his range and landed several heavy shots.


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Round three was close to a repeat of round one, as Kennedy took Bisping down and kept him there.

The bout continued to follow its odd pattern in round four, as the pair stood for the majority of the round. This time, though, while Bisping landed more volume, Kennedy landed the heavier punches and appeared to wobble Bisping at one point.

In the fifth round, Kennedy took Bisping down again. The duo was restarted with about two minutes left, and while Bisping had to know he needed to pull something off to take a decision, he was never really able to get untracked.

Kennedy, a Jackson’s MMA fighter improved to 18-4. He’s won four straight fights and seven out of his last eight. Bisping (24-6) lost for the second time in his past three fights.

“I finish fights, I didn’t finish the fight tonight,” Kennedy said. “I hit him with my best shots, my hat’s off to him and I respect him. I’m just going to keep getting better. “

The duo squashed their beef after the fight.

“What happened is happened,” Bisping said, before shaking Kennedy’s hand. “it’s done, its history, congratulations.”

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Four Pick Up $50,000 In Bonus Checks From TUF Nations Finale

KJ Noons and Ryan Jimmo each earned “Performance of the Night” honors and $ 50,000 for their knockout victories on the prelims of The Ultimate Fighter Nations Finale Wednesday night from Quebec City, Quebec, Canada. Noons stopped Sam Stout in the opening moments, while Jimmo did the same to Sean O’Connell late in the first round. […]

The post Four Pick Up $ 50,000 In Bonus Checks From TUF Nations Finale appeared first on Caged Insider.

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UFC TUF: ‘Nations’ Finale results recap: Dustin Poirier vs Akira Corassani fight review and analysis

Top-ranked UFC Featherweight Dustin Poirier was looking to keep his momentum rolling against Akira Corassani at last night’s (April 16, 2014) TUF: “Nations” Finale from Quebec City, Canada. “Diamond” added another knockout to his growing resume, but it wasn’t without some adversity. Read our breakdown of his exciting win below!

Last night (Weds., April 16, 2014) Ultimate Fighting Championship (UFC) Featherweight notables Dustin Poirier and Akira Corassani went to war in the opening main card bout of The Ultimate Fighter (TUF): “Nations” Finale from Colisee Pepsi in Quebec City, Quebec, Canada.

Both fighters came in off of wins, but they weren’t for the same reason. Poirier destroyed TUF 14 winner Diego Brandao with a first round technical knockout at UFC 168, while Corassani won by disqualification after Maximo Blanco hit him with an illegal knee that broke his nose in five places.

On paper, this mixed martial arts (MMA) match-up between the talented No. 6-ranked Poirier and the unranked Corassani was a bit unfair. In the end, it turned out to be quite the opposite. Poirier scored a knockout, but it wasn’t until after he was nearly put away himself.

The fight kicked off with Corassani landing a left hook. Poirier pressed forward, but Corassani answered with a few shots. Poirier snapped a solid combination that ended in a short clinch. All of the sudden, Corassani dropped “Diamond” with a big left hand that had him in trouble, but he didn’t capitalize on the situation as much as he could have.

Corassani threw a wild spinning kick followed by another sharp right hand. Poirier recovered to nail Corassani with a big left. The fighters engaged in a furious exchange, followed by Poirier going for a Peruvian necktie on the ground. Corassani was in big trouble but survived to land a big knee, eating another combination to end the wild first round.

Poirier came out aggressive to start the second round, nailing Corassani with a massive uppercut and swarming him with a flurry of body shots to earn the finish.

“Diamond” did what everyone thought he was going to do. As a massive -1000 favorite, Poirier was in a lose-lose proposition because a win over Corassani didn’t earn him much, but a loss would have been absolutely devastating.

For a moment in the first round, it looked like that was a distinct possibility.

But Poirier recovered like the professional he is, earning the record for most wins in the UFC featherweight division with eight. If there was one knock on him, it was that he looked a bit overaggressive and impatient in the first round, and he nearly paid the price for it.

However, once he found his range, he showed why his all-around game makes him one of the absolute best 145-pound fighters on the face of the Earth.

He’s ready for a big fight in a loaded division. A fight versus Chad Mendes to decide the next title contender to champion Jose Aldo’s belt would be a blockbuster match-up. If that doesn’t materialize, a bout with Ricardo Lamas makes sense, as would a rematch of his 2012 classic with Chan Sung Jung. Even a bout against Clay Guida, who picked up a “Fight of the Night”-winning decision over Tatsuya Kawajiri at UFC Fight Night 39, could be a solid pairing.

Corassani won’t lose much standing in suffering defeat to Poirier. “Diamond” revealed that Corassani told him his second round uppercut broke his nose again, explaining why he dropped to the canvas and covered up.

It’s an unfortunate result for the Swede, but he looked excellent in the back-and-forth first round. He could have jumped on Poirier when he had him hurt, but overall his footwork and boxing looked sharp.

He’ll most likely face a lengthy medical suspension, but he deserves to fight another Top 15-ranked opponent upon his return.

For complete TUF: “Nations” Finale results, including play-by-play coverage of the entire fight card and much, much more, be sure to check out our comprehensive story stream here.

Dustin Poirier won his third straight bout with a brutal stoppage of Akira Corassani. How many more wins will it take before “Diamond” is fighting for gold?

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After ‘TUF Nations’ Finale Victory, Tim Kennedy Eyeing Munoz-Mousasi Winner

Tim Kennedy is keeping it real in the wake of his win over Michael Bisping.
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Dustin Poirier, Akira Corassani claim Fight of the Night honors at The Ultimate Fighter: Nations Finale

It was selected as the main card opener as it was expected to deliver and that it did, as featherweights Dustin Poirier and Akira Corassani each earned $ 50,000 for their Fight of the Night honors at the The Ultimate Fighter: Nations Finale in Quebec City, Quebec on Wednesday night. All awards were announced by UFC President Dana White at the post-fight press conference.

The fight, expected to be a blowout for Poirier according to the oddsmakers, was surprisingly competitive in the first round. Poirier and Corassani exchanged back and forth with the American Top Team talent in Poirier being rocked early and having to loosen up to fight his way back into the round. Poirier managed a late takedown that he attempted to turn into a Peruvian necktie submission, but Corassani hung tough and the fight moved to the second frame.

From there, however, it didn’t last long. Poirier came out aggressive and landed a leaping, lead uppercut that snapped Corassani’s head back. The shot appeared to damage the already historically-damaged nose of Corassani and he collapsed to the mat. After a few follow-up shots, the referee had no choice but to stop the action.

The end came officially at :42 of round two. Poirier moves to 16-3 in his MMA career while Corassani slides to 12-4 with 1 no-contest.

Claiming the other Performance of the Night bonuses were preliminary card fighters K.J. Noons and Ryan Jimmo.

Noons, facing Sam Stout at welterweight, managed the fastest finish of the night, as he stopped the Canadian lightweight in just 30 seconds. The two barely felt each other out until Noons cracked Stout with a right hand that sent Stout down immediately. Two additional shots on the ground from Noons connected before the referee was forced to stop the action. The win moves Noons to 13-7 in MMA while Stout drops to 20-10-1.

Last, but certainly not least, Ryan Jimmo also scored an impressive knockout win his first-round stoppage of Sean O’Connell. O’Connell had his way early, but Jimmo stayed patient and was able to time a bruising right hand that crumpled O’Connell virtually where he stood. The end was declared at 4:27 of the round. The result brought Jimmo’s record to 19-3 while O’Connell fell to 15-5.

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The Ultimate Fighter Nations Finale: Bisping vs. Kennedy — Liveblogging the Fights You Actually Care About


(Yes Tim…good…let the trollface flow through you. Photo via Getty.)

Sheldon Westcott vs. Elias Theodorou. Chad Laprise vs. Olivier Aubin-Mercier. Richard Walsh vs. Chris Indich. These are just a few of the fights going down on today’s TUF Nations Finale: Bisping vs. Kennedy card that we will not be covering thanks to a combination of apathy, laziness, and bitterness over the current state of the UFC’s product (but mainly apathy and laziness). We will, however, be bringing you live, round-by-round results for the fights you’re actually interested in: Dustin Poirier vs. Akira Corassani, Patrick Cote vs. Kyle Noke, and Tim Kennedy vs. Michael Bisping, so let’s get this international battle underway! YEAH! ‘MURICA!!!

Quick results…

FIGHT PASS PRELIMS
-Mitch Gagnon def. Tim Gorman via unanimous decision (30-27 x 3)
-Richard Walsh def. Chris Indich via unanimous decision (30-27 x 3)
-Nordine Taleb def. Vic Grujic by unanimous decision (30-27 x 3)
-Mark Bocek def. Mike de la Torre via split decision (29-28, 30-27, 28-29)

Uh oh, looks like it’s gonna be one of them nights. And without even seeing the Bocek/Torre fight, I feel totally fine saying that someone needs to get the fuck out with those scores.

FOX SPORTS 1 PRELIMS
-George Roop def. Dustin Kimura via unanimous decision (30-27, 29-28, 29-26)
-Ryan Jimmo def. Sean O’Connell via KO(!), 4:27 of round 1
-Sarah Kaufman def. Leslie Smith via unanimous decision (30-27 x 3)
-KJ Noons def. Sam Stout via KO, 0:30 of round 1

Let’s do this!

Dustin Poirier vs. Akira Corissani

One of these guys almost got stabbed with a pen by Diego Brandao and is a frequent violator of the Chuck Liddell “no touching” rule of pre-fight staredowns. The other is a TUF alum most famous for wearing a fedora. I’m conflicted on who to root more against, to say the least.

Not that anyone cares, but my mega-super-buster parlay is one fight away from coming to fruition. Probably just jinxed it, but I don’t care. My status as a gambling savant has already been validated.

Round 1: Right hand Akira to start things off. Both men are landing, but Poirier clips Akira and the two battle for position along the fence. They separate and Poirier lands a jab. Then another. Poirier is leaping into his punches and gets dropped! Corassani has Poirier on the rebound but appears to be recovering, so Akira fires off some spinning shit that mostly misses. Akira goes body then head, then lands another right. Poirier with a stiff jab, and Akira wings a wild uppercut. Both men are trading and Corassani lands another big right. Akira attemps a takedown and Poirier immediately starts working a D’arce choke. Akira tries to work his way out but Poirier switches to a Peruvian necktie. Corassani is cut badly as both men get back to their feet, but lands another right. Great round.

Round 2: Akira again goes body-head, but Poirier responds with a beautiful combo ending with an uppercut. Corassani is hurt and Poirier swarms for the finish. Dunzo.

Poirier def. Corassani via TKO, 0:42 of round 2 

Poirier really needs to work on his defensive boxing — he gets consistently rocked and has a tendency to leap into his punches — but I’ll be damned if he doesn’t always entertain. Another great fight in the books for “The Diamond” and a nice finish to boot.

Poirier tells Anik that he broke Corassani’s nose with that uppercut, according to Corassani. Couldn’t have happened to a nicer-MIKE BROWN SPOTTING!

Just one fight in and we’ve already come to our first break. I’ll see you guys after this TUF Nations rubbish unless something awesome happens…

Chad Laprise def. Olivier Aubin-Mercier via split decision (29-28, 30-27, 28-29)

Elias Theodorou def. Sheldon Westcott via TKO, 4:41 of round 2

Aaaaand we’re back!

Patrick Cote vs. Kyle Noke

This is a great fight for livebloggers. Both guys are finishers with four letter last names.

Round 1: Cote starts things off with a low shot. Noke lands a teep kick to the face. Leg kick Noke. Cote with a nice right over the top. They clinch along the fence. Noke lands a body kick after the break, but he appears to be cut above the left eye. Cote dives on a takedown and Noke tries for a guillotine but is denied. Cote landing some elbows and punches from full guard. Crowd cheering for Cote as he continues to work from guard and land hammerfists. Noke throws up a triangle that is also denied and Cote lands elbows until the bell sounds. Easy 10-9 Cote.

Round 2: Noke utilizing the front kicks early. Cote rushes in and gets dropped with a knee! Cote fails on a takedown and Noke is teeing off. Cote separates and despite being cut looks recovered. Hell of chin on this Canuck, as we’ve come to learn. Noke lands another left hook, then a front kick to the body. Cote rushes forward, grabs a single, and manages to get Noke down. Cote with some pitter-patter form the guard, as Noke’s sub attempts again come up short. Big elbow Cote, then another. Nice knee to the body from Cote as they separate. Both guys throw feints that mostly miss as the round ends. Another 10-9 for Cote.

Round 3: Noke still using his kicks to keep Cote at bay, but the Canadian lands a nice right. Cote rushes in for a takedown but gets stuffed. They break and Noke lands a left to the body. Left hand upstairs for Noke, then a kick to the body. Cote catches a kick and gets Noke to the mat. Cote moves to side mount for a moment but Noke regains guard. Elbow Cote. Then another that opens a cut on Noke’s hairline. Not looking good for the Aussie as the final 20 seconds expire with Cote controlling him against the fence. 10-9 Cote.

Patrick Cote def. Kyle Noke via unanimous decision (29-28 x 2, 30-27) 

Michael Bisping vs. Tim Kennedy

Again I am conflicted. I want Tim Kennedy to win because ‘Murica, but a Bisping win will net me close to $ 40 on $ 5 alone. Ah fuck it. USA! USA!!!

Round 1: Kennedy almost immediately shoots on a single and gets Bisping down. Wow. Bisping trying to get to his knees but Kennedy gets to half guard. Nice right hand from Kennedy. Kennedy is surprisingly controlling Bisping here. Bisping tries to get to his feet again but Kennedy sucks them out from under him. Bisping finally to his feet and working a kimura, but gets taken down again. Left hand Kennedy from the top. Kennedy gets mount! Bisping trying to buck him but Kennedy is in control. Bisping gives up his back and Kennedy tries for a rear-naked. A scramble ensues and Kennedy winds up back in full guard throwing elbows until the round ends. 10-9 Kennedy.

Round 2: Bisping with a kick to the body. Kennedy wings an overhand right that misses. Bisping with a jab, but he’s coming up short on the majority of his punches. Kennedy with an uppercut in the scramble, then a body kick. Bisping finding his range with a few punches and Kennedy dives on a single. Bisping breaks a body lock and tries a flying knee. Bisping starting to counter Kennedy, who appears to be slowing a bit maybe? Left hand Bisping. Overhand right from Kennedy. Bisping is steadily outboxing Kennedy as the round ends. 10-9 Bisping.

Round 3: Bisping lands a right to start, but Kennedy takes him down. Kennedy working from half guard. Bisping trying to escape, but Kennedy is like a goddamn constrictor. Kennedy to side control now and landing a few lefts. Bisping latches onto a kimura but Kennedy ain’t having it. Body shots from Kennedy now. Kennedy from side control into mount, nice move there. Elbow Kennedy, and a nice pair of left hands to follow. Bisping wall walks and escapes, only to end up with Kennedy back in side control. 10-9 Kennedy as the tiny crowd showers (sprinkles) them in boos.

Round 4: Not much action to start. Kennedy attempts a takedown and has Bisping against the fence. Bisping escapes and the crowd goes mild (BA-DUM-TSH). Both men land right hands. Bisping is clearly the fresher fight, but he seems hesistant to pull the trigger. GO FIGURE, RIGHT?! Kennedy lands a right then grabs another body lock but is denied. Left hook lands for Kennedy. Bisping with a combo. Nice right hand from Kennedy and Bisping is wobbled. Left hand lands for Kennedy, who is cut on the bridge of his nose. Bisping with a right hand. Right Kennedy. Bisping with a right over the top. Close round, but I’d probably give it to Kennedy.

Round 5: Kennedy lands another hard right/teep. Kind of looked like the punch that Petruzelli dropped Kimbo with. Bisping with some pillow fist-I mean jabs. Takedown Kennedy. Bisping gets to his feet but is immediately tripped. Kennedy to mount. Bisping is running out of options here. Kennedy back to mount, then half guard. Lavigne stand ‘em up and Kennedy lands a body kick. Bisping ends a combo with a head kick that partially lands. Jab Bisping. Left Kennedy. One minute left and Bisping isn’t going for it. GO FIGURE RIGHT?!! Bisping with literally the worst spinning backfist I’ve ever seen. 10-9 Kennedy

Tim Kennedy def. Michael Bisping via unanimous decision (49-46 x 2, 50-45) 

Some post-fight ass kissing from both guys, and so ends the lamest grudge match in UFC history.

That’s it for me, folks. It’s nights like these that really, really make me wish I could charge overtime.

Cagepotato

Patrick Cote: ‘I Proved I’m Not Just a Striker Anymore’ at ‘TUF Nations’ Finale

Patrick Cote has turned over a new leaf.
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TUF Nations Finale in Tweets: Pros react to Tim Kennedy vs. Michael Bisping, more

After wasting a calendar year of his career sidelined by a near-catastrophic detached retina, Michael Bisping just couldn’t put it together in his comeback Wednesday night. The polarizing Brit succumbed to the stifling top control of Tim Kennedy to drop a lopsided unanimous decision in the main event of The Ultimate Fighter Nations Finale, which took place at the Colisée Pepsi in Quebec City, Canada.

Check out reaction from the mixed martial arts community below as the two middleweight rivals settled their differences the old fashioned way, along with highlights from the rest of Wednesday’s mid-week event.

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COTE VS. NOKE

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THEODOROU VS. WESTCOTT

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LAPRISE VS. AUBIN-MERCIER

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POIRIER VS. CORASSANI

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NOONS VS. STOUT

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KAUFMAN VS. SMITH

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