Tag Archive for earning

Joanna Jedrzejczyk Plans on Earning ‘GOAT’ Status at UFC 231, Returning to Strawweight in 2019

Joanna Jedrzejczyk plans on leaving UFC 231 as flyweight champion, a victory that in her mind will cement her status as the top female fighter in mixed martial arts history.
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‘Jacare’ Souza on Earning UFC Middleweight Title Shot: ‘I’ve Done My Part’

As the old saying goes, “Good things come to those who wait.”
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‘Jacare’ Souza on Earning UFC Middleweight Title Shot: ‘I’ve Done My Part’

As the old saying goes, “Good things come to those who wait.”
Recent News on Sherdog.com

‘Jacare’ Souza on Earning UFC Middleweight Title Shot: ‘I’ve Done My Part’

As the old saying goes, “Good things come to those who wait.”
Recent News on Sherdog.com

UFC 204: Vitor Belfort believes his value is worth much more than he’s earning

Yes, salaries in the sport of mixed martial arts (MMA) have increased dramatically over the last few years (example here), but there are still quite a bit of fighters who feel they aren’t getting paid what they are worth.

Among them is Vitor Belfort, who says while he gets paid well per fight, his name and accolades should be valued more than they currently are. As he told Fox Sports, he is currently more pre-occupied with trying to book himself some relevant fights in order to up his bank account.

His words:

“Every fight for me it’s a good payday. But I think my value is much more than I’m earning right now, what I bring into the sport. I really do believe, especially where this sport is, my value can be much bigger than what it is right now. There’s no doubt about it.I love to compete and of course now that the real money’s in the sport, I’m looking for fight that’s going to be relevant for myself. For business and this is a business as well as a competition. I’m looking to have fun and make a lot of money.”

As it stands, Belfort earned $ 300,000 for each of his last two fights.

As Belfort sees it, the fact that Gegard has been hunting a a fight against him for the longest time only proves that fighters are eager to share the cage with him because they recognize his value.

“That’s the fight we wanted. He wanted it as well. When two guys want it, it’s good. Business is done. It’s just shows the value. My stake goes up. Guys want to fight you and not the champion, that makes you special. People don’t want to fight a bum. People want to fight guys that’s relevant to the sport and that raises your price. That’s good. It shows what I’ve done. That’s what we’re here for. We’re here to fight each other. “

Should he prove victorious against “The Dreamcatcher” at tonight’s (Sat., Oct. 8, 2016) pay-per-view (PPV) event in Manchester, England, “The Phenom” looks to set himself up for another big payday as he believes Michael Bisping will look for a rematch against him should he defeat Dan Henderson in the main event of the evening.

Wishful thinking, or real possibility?

MMAmania.com will provide LIVE round-by-round, blow-by-blow coverage of the entire UFC 204 fight card on tonight (Sat., Oct. 8, 2016), starting with the Fight Pass “Prelims” matches online, which are scheduled to begin at 7 p.m. ET, right on through the FOX Sports 1-televised under card bouts at 8 p.m. ET and then main card PPV, which is slated to begin at 10 p.m. ET.

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Josh Barnett unconcerned with earning title shots: ‘I just think about winning’

If there is any person in mixed martial arts who has nearly seen it all, it might be UFC heavyweight Josh Barnett. The fighter has done two stints in the UFC, fought in virtually every other organization that mattered, won titles and even matured into a new nickname.

At age 38 and facing Andrei Arlovski at UFC Fight Night 93 on Saturday, the questions about how much longer he intends to keep fighting are becoming more and more frequent.

“My mental state is as good as it’s been,” Barnett said on Monday’s The MMA Hour. “I actually asked for this fight because I’m not the only old geezer on this thing. You got Andrei. He’s just as old as I am, essentially. The fact that he’s been knocked out like twelve times means he’s probably even older yet.

“I’m aiming to make it thirteen,” he continued.

According to Barnett, his latest camp for this main event contest “went really fantastic.” He brought in a series of top sparring partners and coaches, including Joel Scharatt, head coach of the Naval Academy’s wrestling team. This time, Barnett observed, the camp was strong not merely because of who was there, but how long. “It was just of a matter of getting a bit more time with some of these guys,” he said, noting the difference. “I feel great. The mind feels fresh. Loving the German air.”

Still, questions linger in the air not merely about this fight for Barnett, but about the number of them left. His second UFC run has been up and down. The former UFC heavyweight champ has gone 2-2, but both losses have been stoppages, including his first loss via submission most recently against Ben Rothwell.

Barnett knows the career is winding to a close, but remains noncommittal when trying to pinpoint a precise time.

“I don’t know how much longer I’m going to keep doing this because I’ve been doing this for 20 years,” he said. “I was in the gym just getting a little cardio work in, what have you and this kid comes up to me. I’m going to assume Russian, but I know he could be from any number of Eastern European countries.

“He goes, ‘Oh man, I’d really like to shake your hand. It’s really great to meet you. Man, I remember watching you fight way back in the day. I was just a little kid.’

“It hit home, I’ve been doing this that long,” Barnett explained. “There are people that were children. I’ve said it jokingly before, but it is a truth there are people that didn’t even know what the hell the UFC was when I was fighting in it. Now they’re in the UFC. I’ve seen at least, probably, two, maybe three generations of fighters come and go.”

Some of Barnett’s plans likely hinge on what happens inside the Octagon. If things go well, perhaps that could extend the life of his career. If, on the other hand, they go poorly, anything’s possible. Facing a guy like Arlovski on Saturday, who is aging but still dangerous, Barnett notes it’s hard to know what to expect and how that could impact his future. What he is certain of, however, has been a motivational factor in peaking performance.

“I don’t know. I really don’t,” Barnett said when asked what he expected from Arlovski. “He’s done so much over so long of a career and everybody has witnessed his talent time and time again, but I’d like to think that whatever he possesses now is not going to be good enough. And to say whatever he had then was never going to be good enough, but I have to go out there and implement my will upon him. Knowing how tough Andrei Arlovski is meant that I had to train incredibly hard. I had to keep a lot things in mind while I’m training to perfect my approach towards this fight. He is not someone to take lightly and he isn’t anybody to underestimate.

“I have ultimate faith in who I am, what I’ve done and what I possess to go into that cage. Knowing that, it doesn’t diminish the fact of how dangerous an opponent Andrei Arlovski is,” he claimed. “He’s coming off of two losses, but like people often say, it’s the cornered animal.”

Most notably, Barnett said the title isn’t an object of desire. For one, he’s already held the UFC heavyweight crown, albeit something he was forced to give up after testing positive for performance-enhancing drugs following a win over Randy Couture at UFC 36 in June of 2002.

Second, though, is that he still has enough confidence in who he is and what he’s done that he doesn’t feel he ever needs to beg for the opportunity. He’s, in his own estimation, plenty ready, capable and deserving.

“I just think about winning,” Barnett confessed. “Winning is really all that matters. I don’t need to chase titles because I’ve fought in so many title fights and so many title fight-level matches that if somebody thinks I need to give them a reason to give me a shot at any belt in the world, then clearly they don’t know what they’re about as far as MMA. I’m ready to fight anybody with any belt anywhere in the world. This fight could be a title fight in the UFC. It could be a title fight anywhere. It just so happens that it’s not, but it is the main event and I’m hoping that Andrei is a much nicer guy than Roy Nelson. And if I happen to be winning, he actually lets me finish him or something so we don’t have to keep fighting out there.

“To be perfectly honest, he’s a heavyweight, too,” he joked. “I don’t know why the hell he would want to go 25 minutes if he didn’t have to.”

The fight is taking place in 2016, but Barnett likes it not merely for the chance to get back in the win column, but for what it represents in both fighter’s careers. This isn’t veteran vs. young buck. These are two veterans in surprisingly similar positions, both now and previously. The pair also share a bit of history together.

“The way I introduced this fight to the fan base out here was this is UFC vs. PRIDE,” he explained. “He was the UFC hotshot while we were over in PRIDE. This is one of those matchups that people would’ve wanted to have seen back in the day that never happened. By having us get in there now, I know it’s a bit after the fact. Technically, we’re both UFC fighters, not to mention I was a UFC fighter before being a PRIDE fighter. Our ascent in the MMA world started at the same time. He was on the same card as I was, UFC 28 in Atlantic City at the Trump Taj Mahal.”

In some ways, Barnett noted, his motivation hasn’t changed. Maybe he’s moved through organizations, birthdays, belts, countries, and nicknames, but the goal remains the same: beat the toughest guys he can as often as he can, wherever he has to do it.

As long as the mentality to compete like remains, perhaps Barnett will as well.

“Here we are, come full circle. I want to get in the ring with him,” Barnett noted. “I want to challenge this guy that used to be considered unstoppable. Simple as that.”

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Roxanne Modafferi says earning her place on TUF 18 ‘changed my career’

It may seem as though Roxanne Modafferi’s good fortune began with her first fight in Invicta FC in 2014, when she defeated Tara LaRosa. Since that time she’s gone 4-1, rocketed herself into contention as a flyweight.

Yet her turnaround after losing six straight fights coincides with her move to Las Vegas, which itself was galvanized by her earning a spot on The Ultimate Fighter 18 a few years back. The 33-year old Modafferi, considered one of the pioneer’s in women’s MMA with a professional resume that stretches back to 2003, believes that her stint on TUF was the saving grace of her career.

Even if she did lose the only official fight she had with the promotion, dropping a decision against Raquel Pennington in the finale.

“Yeah, it really changed my life,” she told Ariel Helwani on Monday’s edition of The MMA Hour. “And I knew that win to get in the house [against Valerie Letourneau] was the most important win of my career I think.”

Modafferi (19-12) said came to the realization that she had overstayed her welcome living in Japan.

“Yeah, I think so,” she said. “But I’d have had no way of knowing that until I came to The Ultimate Fighter. So how it happened is how it was meant to happen. If I’d have came back, I might gave joined another gym, but it just so happened that it fell into place.

Life has changed for “The Happy Warrior.” Not only has she rediscovered her winning ways training at Syndicate in Las Vegas, she has penned a self-help book called How to Be Positive: Mental Training, which she says came about when she began embracing her nickname.

“Part of embracing ‘The Happy Warrior,’ one thing I really love about being a public figure is that people will hear my words and listen to me and I feel like it’s part of my mission in life to spread positivity to everybody who can listen,” she said on the show. “So, what better way than write a book, and really help people think more positively.”

Modafferi said she is still waiting to finalize her next fight, but that it’s close. She is coming off of a split-decision victory over DeAnna Bennett at Invicta FC 16 in March, and could be in line for at title shot against Barb Honchak, who hasn’t fought since Nov. 2014. With Honchak on the sidelines for so long, Modafferi said she considers Jennifer Maia the true Invicta FC flyweight champion.

Whoever she faces, Modafferi credited her career resurgence to her new surroundings. 

“The coaches here at Syndicate, especially John Wood, have this ability to find what I’m good at and kind of build what they want me to learn around that,” she said. “So like, I’m not such a good natural striker, but he’s been able to add techniques to my striking game that have helped me elevate my striking game, stay awkward. Just the way he’s built stuff around me, and the way he explains things is great. I have a great team, a lot of lightweight fighters here. Our team’s growing, even now we have a bunch of females who enjoy the gym. Really good female team.”

Modafferi has fought for more than a decade, and she’s been able to avoid a ton of damage despite standing in against some of the toughest women in the sport. She has victories over Marloes Coenen, Megumi Yabushita and way back in the day, a pair of victories over Jennifer Howe.

During her six-fight skid when had been living and training in Japan. She said she contemplated calling it quits. 

“There was a point when I still was in Japan that I thought maybe I was going to retire soon, because my body’s always hurting and I feel beat up, and this really sucks,” she said. “But then I came to Vegas and I found like a great chiropractor and masseuse.”

Now going 4-1 her last five fights, she said she feels better now than she has in a long time. And, so long as her health holds up, she’s not looking to retire anytime soon.

“Recently I’ve been feeling good and in shape,” she said. “And, I don’t know man, as long as my body will hold up, and it’s looking pretty good right now…I mean, not looking good, but I feel pretty good. I’ve had a lot of wars, but I’ve never really gotten smashed and bloodied and horribly crushed.”

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Roxanne Modafferi says earning her place on TUF 18 ‘changed my career’

It may seem as though Roxanne Modafferi’s good fortune began with her first fight in Invicta FC in 2014, when she defeated Tara LaRosa. Since that time she’s gone 4-1, rocketed herself into contention as a flyweight.

Yet her turnaround after losing six straight fights coincides with her move to Las Vegas, which itself was galvanized by her earning a spot on The Ultimate Fighter 18 a few years back. The 33-year old Modafferi, considered one of the pioneer’s in women’s MMA with a professional resume that stretches back to 2003, believes that her stint on TUF was the saving grace of her career.

Even if she did lose the only official fight she had with the promotion, dropping a decision against Raquel Pennington in the finale.

“Yeah, it really changed my life,” she told Ariel Helwani on Monday’s edition of The MMA Hour. “And I knew that win to get in the house [against Valerie Letourneau] was the most important win of my career I think.”

Modafferi (19-12) said came to the realization that she had overstayed her welcome living in Japan.

“Yeah, I think so,” she said. “But I’d have had no way of knowing that until I came to The Ultimate Fighter. So how it happened is how it was meant to happen. If I’d have came back, I might gave joined another gym, but it just so happened that it fell into place.

Life has changed for “The Happy Warrior.” Not only has she rediscovered her winning ways training at Syndicate in Las Vegas, she has penned a self-help book called How to Be Positive: Mental Training, which she says came about when she began embracing her nickname.

“Part of embracing ‘The Happy Warrior,’ one thing I really love about being a public figure is that people will hear my words and listen to me and I feel like it’s part of my mission in life to spread positivity to everybody who can listen,” she said on the show. “So, what better way than write a book, and really help people think more positively.”

Modafferi said she is still waiting to finalize her next fight, but that it’s close. She is coming off of a split-decision victory over DeAnna Bennett at Invicta FC 16 in March, and could be in line for at title shot against Barb Honchak, who hasn’t fought since Nov. 2014. With Honchak on the sidelines for so long, Modafferi said she considers Jennifer Maia the true Invicta FC flyweight champion.

Whoever she faces, Modafferi credited her career resurgence to her new surroundings. 

“The coaches here at Syndicate, especially John Wood, have this ability to find what I’m good at and kind of build what they want me to learn around that,” she said. “So like, I’m not such a good natural striker, but he’s been able to add techniques to my striking game that have helped me elevate my striking game, stay awkward. Just the way he’s built stuff around me, and the way he explains things is great. I have a great team, a lot of lightweight fighters here. Our team’s growing, even now we have a bunch of females who enjoy the gym. Really good female team.”

Modafferi has fought for more than a decade, and she’s been able to avoid a ton of damage despite standing in against some of the toughest women in the sport. She has victories over Marloes Coenen, Megumi Yabushita and way back in the day, a pair of victories over Jennifer Howe.

During her six-fight skid when had been living and training in Japan. She said she contemplated calling it quits. 

“There was a point when I still was in Japan that I thought maybe I was going to retire soon, because my body’s always hurting and I feel beat up, and this really sucks,” she said. “But then I came to Vegas and I found like a great chiropractor and masseuse.”

Now going 4-1 her last five fights, she said she feels better now than she has in a long time. And, so long as her health holds up, she’s not looking to retire anytime soon.

“Recently I’ve been feeling good and in shape,” she said. “And, I don’t know man, as long as my body will hold up, and it’s looking pretty good right now…I mean, not looking good, but I feel pretty good. I’ve had a lot of wars, but I’ve never really gotten smashed and bloodied and horribly crushed.”

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Roxanne Modafferi says earning her place on TUF 18 ‘changed my career’

It may seem as though Roxanne Modafferi’s good fortune began with her first fight in Invicta FC in 2014, when she defeated Tara LaRosa. Since that time she’s gone 4-1, rocketed herself into contention as a flyweight.

Yet her turnaround after losing six straight fights coincides with her move to Las Vegas, which itself was galvanized by her earning a spot on The Ultimate Fighter 18 a few years back. The 33-year old Modafferi, considered one of the pioneer’s in women’s MMA with a professional resume that stretches back to 2003, believes that her stint on TUF was the saving grace of her career.

Even if she did lose the only official fight she had with the promotion, dropping a decision against Raquel Pennington in the finale.

“Yeah, it really changed my life,” she told Ariel Helwani on Monday’s edition of The MMA Hour. “And I knew that win to get in the house [against Valerie Letourneau] was the most important win of my career I think.”

Modafferi (19-12) said came to the realization that she had overstayed her welcome living in Japan.

“Yeah, I think so,” she said. “But I’d have had no way of knowing that until I came to The Ultimate Fighter. So how it happened is how it was meant to happen. If I’d have came back, I might gave joined another gym, but it just so happened that it fell into place.

Life has changed for “The Happy Warrior.” Not only has she rediscovered her winning ways training at Syndicate in Las Vegas, she has penned a self-help book called How to Be Positive: Mental Training, which she says came about when she began embracing her nickname.

“Part of embracing ‘The Happy Warrior,’ one thing I really love about being a public figure is that people will hear my words and listen to me and I feel like it’s part of my mission in life to spread positivity to everybody who can listen,” she said on the show. “So, what better way than write a book, and really help people think more positively.”

Modafferi said she is still waiting to finalize her next fight, but that it’s close. She is coming off of a split-decision victory over DeAnna Bennett at Invicta FC 16 in March, and could be in line for at title shot against Barb Honchak, who hasn’t fought since Nov. 2014. With Honchak on the sidelines for so long, Modafferi said she considers Jennifer Maia the true Invicta FC flyweight champion.

Whoever she faces, Modafferi credited her career resurgence to her new surroundings. 

“The coaches here at Syndicate, especially John Wood, have this ability to find what I’m good at and kind of build what they want me to learn around that,” she said. “So like, I’m not such a good natural striker, but he’s been able to add techniques to my striking game that have helped me elevate my striking game, stay awkward. Just the way he’s built stuff around me, and the way he explains things is great. I have a great team, a lot of lightweight fighters here. Our team’s growing, even now we have a bunch of females who enjoy the gym. Really good female team.”

Modafferi has fought for more than a decade, and she’s been able to avoid a ton of damage despite standing in against some of the toughest women in the sport. She has victories over Marloes Coenen, Megumi Yabushita and way back in the day, a pair of victories over Jennifer Howe.

During her six-fight skid when had been living and training in Japan. She said she contemplated calling it quits. 

“There was a point when I still was in Japan that I thought maybe I was going to retire soon, because my body’s always hurting and I feel beat up, and this really sucks,” she said. “But then I came to Vegas and I found like a great chiropractor and masseuse.”

Now going 4-1 her last five fights, she said she feels better now than she has in a long time. And, so long as her health holds up, she’s not looking to retire anytime soon.

“Recently I’ve been feeling good and in shape,” she said. “And, I don’t know man, as long as my body will hold up, and it’s looking pretty good right now…I mean, not looking good, but I feel pretty good. I’ve had a lot of wars, but I’ve never really gotten smashed and bloodied and horribly crushed.”

MMA Fighting – All Posts

Roxanne Modafferi says earning her place on TUF 18 ‘changed my career’

It may seem as though Roxanne Modafferi’s good fortune began with her first fight in Invicta FC in 2014, when she defeated Tara LaRosa. Since that time she’s gone 4-1, rocketed herself into contention as a flyweight.

Yet her turnaround after losing six straight fights coincides with her move to Las Vegas, which itself was galvanized by her earning a spot on The Ultimate Fighter 18 a few years back. The 33-year old Modafferi, considered one of the pioneer’s in women’s MMA with a professional resume that stretches back to 2003, believes that her stint on TUF was the saving grace of her career.

Even if she did lose the only official fight she had with the promotion, dropping a decision against Raquel Pennington in the finale.

“Yeah, it really changed my life,” she told Ariel Helwani on Monday’s edition of The MMA Hour. “And I knew that win to get in the house [against Valerie Letourneau] was the most important win of my career I think.”

Modafferi (19-12) said came to the realization that she had overstayed her welcome living in Japan.

“Yeah, I think so,” she said. “But I’d have had no way of knowing that until I came to The Ultimate Fighter. So how it happened is how it was meant to happen. If I’d have came back, I might gave joined another gym, but it just so happened that it fell into place.

Life has changed for “The Happy Warrior.” Not only has she rediscovered her winning ways training at Syndicate in Las Vegas, she has penned a self-help book called How to Be Positive: Mental Training, which she says came about when she began embracing her nickname.

“Part of embracing ‘The Happy Warrior,’ one thing I really love about being a public figure is that people will hear my words and listen to me and I feel like it’s part of my mission in life to spread positivity to everybody who can listen,” she said on the show. “So, what better way than write a book, and really help people think more positively.”

Modafferi said she is still waiting to finalize her next fight, but that it’s close. She is coming off of a split-decision victory over DeAnna Bennett at Invicta FC 16 in March, and could be in line for at title shot against Barb Honchak, who hasn’t fought since Nov. 2014. With Honchak on the sidelines for so long, Modafferi said she considers Jennifer Maia the true Invicta FC flyweight champion.

Whoever she faces, Modafferi credited her career resurgence to her new surroundings. 

“The coaches here at Syndicate, especially John Wood, have this ability to find what I’m good at and kind of build what they want me to learn around that,” she said. “So like, I’m not such a good natural striker, but he’s been able to add techniques to my striking game that have helped me elevate my striking game, stay awkward. Just the way he’s built stuff around me, and the way he explains things is great. I have a great team, a lot of lightweight fighters here. Our team’s growing, even now we have a bunch of females who enjoy the gym. Really good female team.”

Modafferi has fought for more than a decade, and she’s been able to avoid a ton of damage despite standing in against some of the toughest women in the sport. She has victories over Marloes Coenen, Megumi Yabushita and way back in the day, a pair of victories over Jennifer Howe.

During her six-fight skid when had been living and training in Japan. She said she contemplated calling it quits. 

“There was a point when I still was in Japan that I thought maybe I was going to retire soon, because my body’s always hurting and I feel beat up, and this really sucks,” she said. “But then I came to Vegas and I found like a great chiropractor and masseuse.”

Now going 4-1 her last five fights, she said she feels better now than she has in a long time. And, so long as her health holds up, she’s not looking to retire anytime soon.

“Recently I’ve been feeling good and in shape,” she said. “And, I don’t know man, as long as my body will hold up, and it’s looking pretty good right now…I mean, not looking good, but I feel pretty good. I’ve had a lot of wars, but I’ve never really gotten smashed and bloodied and horribly crushed.”

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