Tag Archive for Denied

Stipe Miocic: The UFC Denied Me A Rematch With Daniel Cormier at UFC 230

The official announcement that Ultimate Fighting Championship heavyweight and light heavyweight champ Daniel Cormier will defend his heavyweight title against Derrick Lewis on Nov. 3 in New York has been met with mixed reactions amongst fans as well as at least one notable fighter
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Josh Thomson’s appeal of Patricky Pitbull loss denied by California commission

ANAHEIM, Calif. — Josh Thomson’s loss to Patricky Freire will remain.

The California State Athletic Commission (CSAC) unanimously denied Thomson’s appeal of the result of his fight with Freire from Bellator 172 on Feb. 18 at its meeting Tuesday here.

Thomson lost by second-round knockout, but cited an illegal headbutt from Freire that dropped him in his appeal letter. Thomson believed that, while the headbutt did not directly cause the knockout, the illegal blow contributed significantly to his eventual loss and he was not given any time to recover after it.

In the course of the fight, referee John McCarthy did not halt the action when the incidental headbutt occurred, because it happened so quickly and McCarthy was unsure if a legal or illegal blow dropped Thomson.

“One issue in question is whether the foul changed the momentum of the fight that resulted in my KO,” Thomson wrote in the appeal letter. “The other issue in question is, should my fight be ruled a Technical Draw as the injury I sustained by foul allowed my opponent to win by contributing to the injury I sustained when fouled.”

Thomson, the former Strikeforce lightweight champion, was hoping to have the result changed to a technical draw, because “the injury I sustained by foul allowed my opponent to win by contributing to the injury I sustained when fouled.”

By rule, the foul has to directly cause the finish. CSAC executive officer Andy Foster wrote in his recommendation to the commission that the appeal be denied, because Thomson still had his druthers after the headbutt and put forth offense after it, including escaping from the bottom and a takedown attempt.

“After multiple reviews of the video, we determined that an accidental clash of heads did occur, which caused Mr. Thompson [sic] to fall to the ground, but this was before he stood back up and continued the fight only to be countered with an uppercut causing the knockout,” Foster wrote.

In his letter to the commission, McCarthy wrote that he polled a judge after the finish of the fight and the judge told him a left hook caused the drop, when in actuality it was a headbutt. He also mentioned Thomson’s ability to get up following the illegal blow.

“The real question here is how hurt was Josh Thompson [sic] due to the unintentional clash of heads,” McCarthy said. “This type of activity happens frequently in MMA, but many times the fighters just continue with the action of the fight. Only Josh knows how much the clash affected him. It is clear when you watch a replay of the fight that Josh quickly and skillfully gets himself back to his feet from the knockdown and that the blow, which brought an end to the fight, was completely legal. It should be noted that when Josh was fully back and functioning after the KO he came to me and said, ‘Damn John I got headbutted.’”

The commissioners were unable to watch the replay of the sequence due to technical difficulties with a computer Tuesday. Neither Thomson nor any representative was in attendance.

Freire wrote in a tweet Tuesday that he agreed with the commission’s choice and is willing to grant Thomson a rematch.

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Nick Diaz denied entry to UFC 202 weigh-ins

LAS VEGAS — The UFC and MGM were not kidding around.

Nick Diaz was not allowed into the UFC 202 ceremonial weigh-ins Friday at MGM Grand, Diaz confirmed with MMA Fighting’s Ariel Helwani. Diaz posted a video of him being denied entry on his Snapchat.

Diaz’s brother Nate is fighting Conor McGregor in the main event of UFC 202 on Saturday at MGM’s T-Mobile Arena. It’s unclear if Nick will be allowed in the building to watch his brother’s fight.

Earlier in the week, the UFC and MGM said members of Team Diaz and Team McGregor were going to be banned from UFC 202 events due to a bottle-throwing mess at the pre-fight press conference Wednesday. The only people allowed in would be Nevada Athletic Commission (NAC) licensed corner people.

Nick Diaz, the popular UFC middleweight fighter, is currently still suspended by the commission as a result of a failed marijuana test in 2015. He cannot obtain a license to corner anyone or fight until he either pays the rest of a fine or enters into an approved payment plan, per NAC executive director Bob Bennett.

Nick was suspended by the NAC earlier this year for 18 months and fined $ 100,000 due to the weed failure. The 18-month ban was up on Aug. 1, but Nick still owes the state $ 75,000, Bennett said.

As of Thursday, Diaz was still attempting to clear up his issue with the commission in order to corner Nate on Saturday, according to Nick’s manager Lloyd Pierson. That is looking more and more unlikely now.

Bennett told MMA Fighting on Friday that Nick Diaz was not licensed “at this time and date.”

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UFC exec: Frank Mir was not denied Adderall TUE by Nevada Athletic Commission

Frank Mir was not denied a therapeutic use exemption (TUE) in Nevada, according to the UFC’s vice president of athlete health and performance. He just was not able to apply for one with enough time to spare before his fight.

Jeff Novitzky told MMA Fighting on Friday that Mir was granted a TUE for Adderall by USADA, which runs the UFC’s anti-doping program. When Mir attempted to apply for the same exemption with the Nevada Athletic Commission (NAC), he was told that there wasn’t enough time before his UFC 191 co-main event with Andrei Arlovski to do so, according to Novitzky.

On Thursday, Lance Pugmire of the Los Angeles Times reported that the NAC ruled Mir’s Adderall TUE with USADA inadmissible. Novitzky clarified that the UFC and USADA had told Mir from the beginning that he would also need to apply for a TUE with the commission that holds jurisdiction for his fights.

“They indicated to us that there was not enough time for him to put one in,” Novitzky said. “So, there’s been some inaccurate reporting in the media that Mir has had a TUE declined by the Nevada commission. That’s completely inaccurate. Frank never submitted a TUE through Nevada. Instead, he was told by me personally as soon as we knew there wasn’t enough time in Nevada that you’re not gonna have permission by Nevada to take this prohibited substance in the fight and you should discontinue it immediately. He indicated that he did so.”

NAC executive director Bob Bennett did not wish to comment specifically about Mir’s situation, though he told Pugmire on Thursday that USADA is “confusing the fighters.” What Bennett did say is that regardless of what TUE a fighter gets from USADA, he or she will still have to apply for one in Nevada if the fighter is competing there.

“It’s really non-negotiable,” Bennett told MMA Fighting. “The Nevada State Athletic Commission is the only body that can authorize a therapeutic use exemption in the state of Nevada.”

Bennett said any TUE given to a fighter by USADA or VADA or any other body has “no standing” with the NAC.

“They must fill out our paperwork, provide us with the documentation from their doctors in support of their TUEs and then it will go to our doctor and our doctor will make that determination,” Bennett said.

Novitzky said USADA will be granting TUEs to UFC fighters under the new anti-doping program and that the entire process will be confidential due to the involvement of personal medical records. So other fighters and the public will not know if a fighter is using a WADA-prohibited substance with a TUE granted by WADA. The only reason Mir’s situation has been addressed is because Mir granted the UFC permission to talk about it, Novitzky said. Mir ended up losing to Arlovski by split decision.

Once a fighter applies for an exemption, Novitzky said the request will go to USADA’s committee overseeing TUEs, which is made up of medical experts. Two of those experts, who focus on the particular substances in question, will then decide whether or not the athlete should be allowed to use it. If they cannot come to a consensus, another expert will be brought in to break the tie. USADA’s medical science director will then make the final determination based on the findings of the experts.

The USADA process will seek to determine that the medical records and diagnoses provided by the fighter are accurate and well-supported, that there are no other reasonable medical alternatives and that usage will only bring the fighter back to a normal level with no performance benefits, per Novitzky.

Novitzky said that doesn’t mean fighters will be granted testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) exemptions, which were banned last year. Novitzky said TRT would not meet USADA’s standards unless there was a very unique circumstance.

“The only way I could see testosterone is literally if the individual needed it to survive and live and if that was the case that person is probably not cut out for the UFC,” Novitzky said.

The necessity for USADA TUEs outside the scope of athletic commissions is due to the fact that USADA will be testing UFC fighters year-round, even if they are not licensed for an upcoming bout.

Regarding the SB Nation article published this week that calls into question USADA’s handling of Floyd Mayweather and other boxers, Novitzky said he was informed by the agency that the piece was “filled with factual inaccuracies and falsehoods.” He is confident moving forward with USADA as the UFC’s anti-doping partner.

“Based on 15 years of working with them and seeing how they make decisions and seeing how those decisions are ethical and how every single time they adhere to carrying out the WADA code, I have 100 percent confidence that we have enlisted the gold standard, best anti-doping agency in the world and all of our athletes should have that same trust and confidence,” Novitzky said. “I haven’t lost any of that in USADA. They’re the best.”

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UFC exec: Frank Mir was not denied Adderall TUE by Nevada Athletic Commission

Frank Mir was not denied a therapeutic use exemption (TUE) in Nevada, according to the UFC’s vice president of athlete health and performance. He just was not able to apply for one with enough time to spare before his fight.

Jeff Novitzky told MMA Fighting on Friday that Mir was granted a TUE for Adderall by USADA, which runs the UFC’s anti-doping program. When Mir attempted to apply for the same exemption with the Nevada Athletic Commission (NAC), he was told that there wasn’t enough time before his UFC 191 co-main event with Andrei Arlovski to do so, according to Novitzky.

On Thursday, Lance Pugmire of the Los Angeles Times reported that the NAC ruled Mir’s Adderall TUE with USADA inadmissible. Novitzky clarified that the UFC and USADA had told Mir from the beginning that he would also need to apply for a TUE with the commission that holds jurisdiction for his fights.

“They indicated to us that there was not enough time for him to put one in,” Novitzky said. “So, there’s been some inaccurate reporting in the media that Mir has had a TUE declined by the Nevada commission. That’s completely inaccurate. Frank never submitted a TUE through Nevada. Instead, he was told by me personally as soon as we knew there wasn’t enough time in Nevada that you’re not gonna have permission by Nevada to take this prohibited substance in the fight and you should discontinue it immediately. He indicated that he did so.”

NAC executive director Bob Bennett did not wish to comment specifically about Mir’s situation, though he told Pugmire on Thursday that USADA is “confusing the fighters.” What Bennett did say is that regardless of what TUE a fighter gets from USADA, he or she will still have to apply for one in Nevada if the fighter is competing there.

“It’s really non-negotiable,” Bennett told MMA Fighting. “The Nevada State Athletic Commission is the only body that can authorize a therapeutic use exemption in the state of Nevada.”

Bennett said any TUE given to a fighter by USADA or VADA or any other body has “no standing” with the NAC.

“They must fill out our paperwork, provide us with the documentation from their doctors in support of their TUEs and then it will go to our doctor and our doctor will make that determination,” Bennett said.

Novitzky said USADA will be granting TUEs to UFC fighters under the new anti-doping program and that the entire process will be confidential due to the involvement of personal medical records. So other fighters and the public will not know if a fighter is using a WADA-prohibited substance with a TUE granted by WADA. The only reason Mir’s situation has been addressed is because Mir granted the UFC permission to talk about it, Novitzky said. Mir ended up losing to Arlovski by split decision.

Once a fighter applies for an exemption, Novitzky said the request will go to USADA’s committee overseeing TUEs, which is made up of medical experts. Two of those experts, who focus on the particular substances in question, will then decide whether or not the athlete should be allowed to use it. If they cannot come to a consensus, another expert will be brought in to break the tie. USADA’s medical science director will then make the final determination based on the findings of the experts.

The USADA process will seek to determine that the medical records and diagnoses provided by the fighter are accurate and well-supported, that there are no other reasonable medical alternatives and that usage will only bring the fighter back to a normal level with no performance benefits, per Novitzky.

Novitzky said that doesn’t mean fighters will be granted testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) exemptions, which were banned last year. Novitzky said TRT would not meet USADA’s standards unless there was a very unique circumstance.

“The only way I could see testosterone is literally if the individual needed it to survive and live and if that was the case that person is probably not cut out for the UFC,” Novitzky said.

The necessity for USADA TUEs outside the scope of athletic commissions is due to the fact that USADA will be testing UFC fighters year-round, even if they are not licensed for an upcoming bout.

Regarding the SB Nation article published this week that calls into question USADA’s handling of Floyd Mayweather and other boxers, Novitzky said he was informed by the agency that the piece was “filled with factual inaccuracies and falsehoods.” He is confident moving forward with USADA as the UFC’s anti-doping partner.

“Based on 15 years of working with them and seeing how they make decisions and seeing how those decisions are ethical and how every single time they adhere to carrying out the WADA code, I have 100 percent confidence that we have enlisted the gold standard, best anti-doping agency in the world and all of our athletes should have that same trust and confidence,” Novitzky said. “I haven’t lost any of that in USADA. They’re the best.”

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UFC drug czar: Frank Mir was not denied Adderall TUE by Nevada Athletic Commission

Frank Mir was not denied a therapeutic use exemption (TUE) in Nevada, according to the UFC’s vice president of athlete health and performance. He just was not able to apply for one with enough time to spare before his fight.

Jeff Novitzky told MMA Fighting on Friday that Mir was granted a TUE for Adderall by USADA, which runs the UFC’s anti-doping program. When Mir attempted to apply for the same exemption with the Nevada Athletic Commission (NAC), he was told that there wasn’t enough time before his UFC 191 co-main event with Andrei Arlovski to do so, according to Novitzky.

On Thursday, Lance Pugmire of the Los Angeles Times reported that the NAC ruled Mir’s Adderall TUE with USADA inadmissible. Novitzky clarified that the UFC and USADA had told Mir from the beginning that he would also need to apply for a TUE with the commission that holds jurisdiction for his fights.

“They indicated to us that there was not enough time for him to put one in,” Novitzky said. “So, there’s been some inaccurate reporting in the media that Mir has had a TUE declined by the Nevada commission. That’s completely inaccurate. Frank never submitted a TUE through Nevada. Instead, he was told by me personally as soon as we knew there wasn’t enough time in Nevada that you’re not gonna have permission by Nevada to take this prohibited substance in the fight and you should discontinue it immediately. He indicated that he did so.”

NAC executive director Bob Bennett did not wish to comment specifically about Mir’s situation, though he told Pugmire on Thursday that USADA is “confusing the fighters.” What Bennett did say is that regardless of what TUE a fighter gets from USADA, he or she will still have to apply for one in Nevada if the fighter is competing there.

“It’s really non-negotiable,” Bennett told MMA Fighting. “The Nevada State Athletic Commission is the only body that can authorize a therapeutic use exemption in the state of Nevada.”

Bennett said any TUE given to a fighter by USADA or VADA or any other body has “no standing” with the NAC.

“They must fill out our paperwork, provide us with the documentation from their doctors in support of their TUEs and then it will go to our doctor and our doctor will make that determination,” Bennett said.

Novitzky said USADA will be granting TUEs to UFC fighters under the new anti-doping program and that the entire process will be confidential due to the involvement of personal medical records. So other fighters and the public will not know if a fighter is using a WADA-prohibited substance with a TUE granted by WADA. The only reason Mir’s situation has been addressed is because Mir granted the UFC permission to talk about it, Novitzky said. Mir ended up losing to Arlovski by split decision.

Once a fighter applies for an exemption, Novitzky said the request will go to USADA’s committee overseeing TUEs, which is made up of medical experts. Two of those experts, who focus on the particular substances in question, will then decide whether or not the athlete should be allowed to use it. If they cannot come to a consensus, another expert will be brought in to break the tie. USADA’s medical science director will then make the final determination based on the findings of the experts.

The USADA process will seek to determine that the medical records and diagnoses provided by the fighter are accurate and well-supported, that there are no other reasonable medical alternatives and that usage will only bring the fighter back to a normal level with no performance benefits, per Novitzky.

Novitzky said that doesn’t mean fighters will be granted testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) exemptions, which were banned last year. Novitzky said TRT would not meet USADA’s standards unless there was a very unique circumstance.

“The only way I could see testosterone is literally if the individual needed it to survive and live and if that was the case that person is probably not cut out for the UFC,” Novitzky said.

The necessity for USADA TUEs outside the scope of athletic commissions is due to the fact that USADA will be testing UFC fighters year-round, even if they are not licensed for an upcoming bout.

Regarding the SB Nation article published this week that calls into question USADA’s handling of Floyd Mayweather and other boxers, Novitzky said he was informed by the agency that the piece was “filled with factual inaccuracies and falsehoods.” He is confident moving forward with USADA as the UFC’s anti-doping partner.

“Based on 15 years of working with them and seeing how they make decisions and seeing how those decisions are ethical and how every single time they adhere to carrying out the WADA code, I have 100 percent confidence that we have enlisted the gold standard, best anti-doping agency in the world and all of our athletes should have that same trust and confidence,” Novitzky said. “I haven’t lost any of that in USADA. They’re the best.”

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UFC Fight Night 26: Cole Miller’s Appeal Is Denied

Cole Miller made an appeal to the Massachusetts Athletic Commission following his loss to Manny Gamburyan this past August. Miller felt that Gamburyan should have been ruled finished after he was given longer than a minute between the first and second rounds. Miller nailed him with several elbows that were not deemed illegal. Below is […]

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UFC Fight Night 29 Bonuses: Palhares Denied; Assuncao, Dillashaw, Kim Pocket $50K Each

Despite pulling off UFC Fight Night 29’s lone submission victory, Rousimar Palhares did not receive a “Submission of the Night” bonus.
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UFN 29: Kim, Assuncao and Dillashaw Pick up Awards, Palhares Denied

Not only did Dong Hyun Kim score a huge win tonight at UFC Fight Night 29, but the welterweight demonstrated he’s more than a ridiculously talented grappler, by brutally knocking out Erick Silva. If you missed it, Kim floored Silva with a crushing left hand in round two, and earned “Knockout of the Night” for […]

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UFN 29: Kim, Assuncao and Dillashaw Pick up Awards, Palhares Denied

Not only did Dong Hyun Kim score a huge win tonight at UFC Fight Night 29, but the welterweight demonstrated he’s more than a ridiculously talented grappler, by brutally knocking out Erick Silva. If you missed it, Kim floored Silva with a crushing left hand in round two, and earned “Knockout of the Night” for […]

The post UFN 29: Kim, Assuncao and Dillashaw Pick up Awards, Palhares Denied appeared first on Caged Insider.

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