Tag Archive for Commentary

Joe Rogan Addresses Critical Commentary Toward Nurmagomedov During UFC 223

Khabib Nurmagomedov was complete control at UFC 223, as cruised to a unanimous decision victory over Al Iaquinta to claim the lightweight title on Saturday at the Barclays Center in Brooklyn, N.Y.
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Live Chat: Bellator commentary, UFC Singapore preview, Dana vs. DJ and MMA news

This is the Promotional Malpractice Live Chat.

Bellator made big news on Tuesday when they announced former UFC commentator Mike Goldberg along with former PRIDE, WWE, Glory and current Showtime boxing commentator Mauro Ranallo had signed with their organization. Sean Grande, on the other hand, is out. Is this good for the company? Will this meaningfully change things? What can we expect from both Goldberg and Ranallo? We’ll delve into this territory.

Plus, we’re coming off of UFC Auckland, heading for UFC Singapore. There’s not a whole lot to breakdown with either, but the rest of the summer is coming together. It’s not the best summer the sport’s ever seen, but it’s not the worst. We’ll go into the good, bad and ugly of the summer…

MMA Fighting – All Posts

Jon Anik reflects on three-man commentary team at UFC 208: ‘It was a challenging broadcast’

The most recent UFC pay-per-view was a challenging broadcast for experienced UFC play-by-play commentator Jon Anik.

UFC 208, which went down on Saturday, Feb. 11 and was headlined by Germaine de Randamie vs. Holly Holm, was the first UFC pay-per-view following the departure of long-time play-by-play commentator Mike Goldberg in December. Prior to his exit, Goldberg and UFC color commentator Joe Rogan made up the main broadcasting team the UFC used for major events.

In light of Goldberg’s absence, the UFC put together a three-man team with Anik, Rogan, and UFC light heavyweight champion Daniel Cormier to narrate the action for UFC 208. The change marked the first time in recent memory that the UFC used a three-man commentary team.

Reflecting back on the event, Anik called UFC 208 a challenging experience.

“It was a challenging broadcast,” Anik told Ariel Helwani on Monday’s edition of The MMA Hour. “There were a lot of wrinkles that went into it. At least from a pay-per-view standpoint, there was a lot of sponsorship inventory, so I felt like every time I wanted to say something about fighting, you know, our stage manager would hand me a card of Halo Wars 2. I hope they paid the UFC a lot of money this weekend because I felt every word out of my mouth was Halo Wars 2, but it’s an interesting navigation with the three-man booth, particularly for mixed martial arts, a sport in which the line between play-by-play guy and analyst is blurred unlike in other sports.

“There is a lot of real estate there, but it’s not uncommon in MMA to hear an analyst call out a left hand or a combination, so that line is blurred in MMA.”

Some of the feedback fans had for the three-man team at UFC 208 was that Anik wasn’t as active on the microphone as he usually is on other UFC broadcasts. Anik says the reason for him not having as much air time is, in part, because he wanted to give Rogan and Cormier the spotlight. But like most new changes, Anik also believes the three-man booth is a work in progress.

“I did have a sensitivity to Joe and Daniel, and I wanted to make sure, as any good play-by-play would want to do, that those two guys would shine,” Anik explained. “I said when I was going in [to UFC 208], that I was going to air on the side of not saying enough. If there was going to be any criticisms of me after this pay-per-view, it was going to be that I didn’t say enough. And I feel like in the Fight Pass prelims, I started to find my way a little bit and work my way in. But at the end of the day, dude, it’s just not about me, you know?

“It’s about Germaine de Randamie and Holly Holm. And Joe Rogan is brilliant and has such an infectious energy about him. If I take myself out of it, and I put myself in Joe Rogan’s shoes, to his right is the UFC light heavyweight champion of the world and an Olympic wrestler, and to his left is a broadcaster. So if he was leaning to DC early on, or I was letting them have their way, I think that a lot of fans rather hear those two guys.

“I know I heard from a lot of fans saying they wanted to hear more of me, and that’s certainly not a criticism that’s been levied at me in the past. I’m okay with it. I think UFC 209 will be a little bit better and I think it’s a work in progress, and what’s interesting is that we didn’t really have much to work with in these fights. There was one finish and there weren’t a lot of seminal moments to cap necessarily. So it’s a work in progress, but I think we’re happy to have that first one in the can.”

For now, the UFC’s plan is to continue to have a three-man booth for future UFC pay-per-view events. Former UFC bantamweight champion and FOX Sports 1 analyst Dominick Cruz will also participate, joining Anik and Rogan in this new broadcasting team format.

MMA Fighting – All Posts

Chael Sonnen added to World Series of Fighting commentary team

Slowly but surely, Chael Sonnen is moving his way back into the MMA world.

The 38-year old former top middleweight contender, who is on the back end of a two-year steroid-related suspension, will soon serve as a color commentator for World Series of Fighting. MMAFighting.com confirmed an initial Tuesday report by Yahoo Sports.

Sonnen will debut as analyst at WSOF 23 in Phoenix on Sept. 18 for an NBCSN broadcast headlined by a rematch between lightweight champion Justin Gaethje and Luis Palomino.

“I am stoked to join the powerhouse team at World Series of Fighting, and call their fights that feature some of the best mixed martial artists on the planet,” Sonnen told Yahoo Sports. “World Series of Fighting has done an outstanding job of building their organization into a top-tier franchise in a very short span of time, and I am just proud to be a part of such a fast-growing company.”

The outspoken Sonnen has made several prior ventures into the broadcasting world. He was a UFC studio host for FOX Sports before losing the job in the wake of his 2014 Nevada Athletic Commission suspension. He’s since done analyst work for ESPN and worked with legendary wrestling announcer Jim Ross on an independent one-night MMA tournament event last year.

Sonnen also hosts a popular podcast titled “You’re Welcome.”

WSOF matchmaker Ali Abdelaziz praised Sonnen in comments to MMAFighting.com.

“We are very happy to have Chael on board,” Abdelaziz said. “He is a great athlete and one of the best analysts ever. Myself, ray, and Carlos silva are excited about having him as part of the WSOF broadcast.”

MMA Fighting – All Posts

UFC on FOX 14: Gustafsson vs. Johnson — Live Results & Commentary


(Alexander Gustafsson, Anthony Johnson, and DMX in the camouflage, ready to ask some hard-hitting questions./Photo via Getty)

The UFC showcase on FOX returns tonight for its 14th installment, featuring a huge light heavyweight title eliminator on deck. Alexander Gustafsson will be looking to book his rematch against Jon Jones, as he dukes it out against rising contender Anthony Johnson in the five-round main event inside Tele2 Arena in Stockholm, Sweden. The winner of this bout will most likely square off against the champion later this year.

In the co-main event, Dan Henderson will try to prove he’s not way over the hill like most of us think he is, as he faces Gegard Mousasi. Both combatants are coming off submission losses, looking to storm back into the win column. Also on the card, Phil Davis battles Ryan Bader, and kicking off the FOX action will be Akira Corassani vs. Sam Sicilia.

Our man Alex Giardini will be providing round-by-round UFC on FOX 14 results from the FOX main card, after the jump beginning at 8 p.m. ET / 5 p.m. PT. Refresh the page every few minutes for all the latest, and hit us up on twitter to share your own thoughts.

UFC on FOX 14 Preliminary Card Results:
Albert Tumenov def. Nico Musoke via unanimous decision (29-28×3)
Kenny Robertson def. Sultan Aliev via TKO (strikes) at 2:42 of R1
Makwan Amirkhani def. Andy Ogle via TKO (strikes) at 0:08 of R1
Nikita Krylov def. Stanislav Nedkov via submission (guillotine) at 1:24 of R1
Mairbek Taisumov def. Anthony Christodoulou via knockout (strikes) at 0:38 of R2
Mirsad Bektic def. Paul Redmond via unanimous decision (30-27 x2, 30-25)
Viktor Pesta def. Konstantin Erokhin via unanimous decision (30-27 x2, 29-28)
Neil Seery def. Chris Beal via unanimous decision (30-27 x2, 29-28)

Alright, Nation … it’s been a rough week, so let’s try to have some fun tonight. After all, the majority of us aren’t in an arena watching MMA at 2 a.m. right now (much love to our readers from Sweden, as always).

Akira Corassani vs. Sam Sicilia

Round 1: No glove touch, and we’re off. Akira looking faster than usual, bouncy and light on his feet. Both guys trying to feel each other out, and it’s Sicilia that lands a nice hook. They jostle against the fence after both land hard shots in a flurry. Good leg kicks from Akira, and he gets nailed with a left hook shortly after throwing wildly. Akira catches a leg kick, and puts the hands on Sicilia. Akira comes in with an uppercut, but Sicilia stays out of the way. Akira looking agile, working on the outside, but not really troubling his opponent, either. Sicilia throws a counter, and both guys land on the chin. Akira comes in, they exchange and then he gets flattened by a humongous right hand. Akira hits the mat hard, out like a light. Very much like an H-Bomb…sign of things to come?

Sam Sicilia def. Akira Corassani via knockout (strikes) at 3:26 of R1

Phil Davis vs. Ryan Bader

Round 1: They touch gloves, both out orthodox. Bader pressuring Davis early, while Davis stays low and threatens with jabs. Bader rushes through, and lands one straight after throwing a number of punches. Bader clips Davis with a short, right hook, and pegs him back with a jab. Davis pushes for a takedown, and Bader defends. Kick to the body from Bader blocked, but he’s doing better than his foe on his feet. With that said, Davis lands a big overhead right. Davis goes to the body, while Bader misses an uppercut. Davis doesn’t allow himself to get too close to the fence, yet he’s allowing Bader to maneuver and settle in. The crowd rallying both fighters, as the action is a little slow. Davis tries to lock up Bader for a tussle, but the latter shakes him off. Davis with a kick to the body, and Bader just misses with a huge right hand. Davis now backing up Bader, with his lands low and looking to get on the inside without taking risks. Davis changes levels, but nothing big to end the round.

Round 2: Bader a little quicker to get to the center, and Davis’ movement is a little quicker, too. Davis is cutting the angles well. Davis goes for the takedown, but Bader defends and switches to a dominant position against the fence. Bader shrugs off Davis’ attempts, but Davis is relentless with the attempts. Davis locks him up, but then, Bader reverses and looks for a single leg. Davis has Bader’s back and in a weird position, Davis takes him down and he’s trying to take his back. Bader stands up, and he’s going for the single leg again. Davis has him up against the fence, attacking with weak knees to the body. Davis with a bit of stall, but Bader’s trying to fight out of the position.

Round 3: Davis back peddling, and Bader needs to really bring the fight to him now. He’s doing well, but Davis looks way to comfortable on the outside to risk anything. Jabs from Bader, and Davis is responding with low kicks. Bader trying to look for the parting shot, while Davis stays low and picks his shots without real conviction. Big right hand lands for Davis. Takedown attempt by Davis defended by Bader, and now the latter has him in a head lock. No submission attack, but Bader hits him with a knee on the way up. Another takedown stuffed from Bader. He may not be fazed when it comes to the wrestling attacks, but Bader looks too tired and confused to go for something big. Davis following Bader’s side-to-side shuffles, since there’s no urgency to counter. Davis with another solid right hand, followed by a big leg kick. Davis hurts Bader with a right hand, despite the latter staying on his feet and continuing to press forward. Bader getting a little more gritty with seconds left, and Davis rushes forward for the takedown. Bader reverses, and then scores a belly-to-back suplex. Davis’ right eye is almost swollen shut, but he should get the nod.

Ryan Bader def. Phil Davis by split decision (29-28×2, 28-29)

Meh, it’s fair, I guess. Neither guy really convinced anyone they were thirsty for blood. Moving on, these next two fights should be the business. Let’s hope it doesn’t take 20 minutes for the next bout.

Gegard Mousasi vs. Dan Henderson

Round 1: Mousasi working with jabs, and goes to hack at the legs. Pressuring with jabs, Mousasi is backing up the legend, and making him circle. Hendo is in familiar stance, and misses a big right hand. Mousasi clips Heno with a short right hook, and Hendo drops while stepping backwards. Mousasi follows up, and the ref stops it. Hendo protests, and while he was taking damage, like we know he can, it’s a bit of a controversial stoppage.

Gegard Mousasi def. Dan Henderson via TKO (strikes) at 1:10 of R1

That one sort of sucked the life out of the arena, and us at home. It’s not like Hendo can take a shot like he used to, though. Let’s get on with the main event. This one should be pretty freaking entertaining.

Alexander Gustafsson vs. Anthony Johnson

Round 1: Gusty attacks right off the bat with some kicks and a few jab attempts. Johnson is cutting down Gusty’s angles, and moving him back. They swing wildly, both landing in an exchange. AJ misses with a head kick, and Gusty lands a few jabs. An eyepoke to AJ stops the action for a bit. Gusty goes for a kick, and AJ drops him with a club. Gusty is back up, but he’s eating more right hands. AJ with a head kick, and he starts to pour on the pressure. Gusty tumbles on, and AJ is on his back, lacing him with uppercuts. Marc Goddard being kind, and Gusty is taking some clean shots on the ground. The ref steps in, and that’s that. Stockholm is silent, and the brass must be fuming. Rumble is for-fucking-real, holy crap.

Man, Gusty is crying on his cornerman’s shoulder. Christ almighty. Hard to watch. He also may or may not have shoved the camera out of his face. We got cut off for a second.

Anthony Johnson def. Alexander Gustafsson via TKO (strikes) at 2:15 of R1

That’s it for me, Nation. Stay strong, stay positive. We wake up tomorrow, and it’s a new day. It’s the best we can do. Much love, peace.

Cagepotato

UFC on FOX 14: Gustafsson vs. Johnson — Live Results & Commentary


(Alexander Gustafsson, Anthony Johnson, and DMX in the camouflage, ready to ask some hard-hitting questions./Photo via Getty)

The UFC showcase on FOX returns tonight for its 14th installment, featuring a huge light heavyweight title eliminator on deck. Alexander Gustafsson will be looking to book his rematch against Jon Jones, as he dukes it out against rising contender Anthony Johnson in the five-round main event inside Tele2 Arena in Stockholm, Sweden. The winner of this bout will most likely square off against the champion later this year.

In the co-main event, Dan Henderson will try to prove he’s not way over the hill like most of us think he is, as he faces Gegard Mousasi. Both combatants are coming off submission losses, looking to storm back into the win column. Also on the card, Phil Davis battles Ryan Bader, and kicking off the FOX action will be Akira Corassani vs. Sam Sicilia.

Our man Alex Giardini will be providing round-by-round UFC on FOX 14 results from the FOX main card, after the jump beginning at 8 p.m. ET / 5 p.m. PT. Refresh the page every few minutes for all the latest, and hit us up on twitter to share your own thoughts.

UFC on FOX 14 Preliminary Card Results:
Albert Tumenov def. Nico Musoke via unanimous decision (29-28×3)
Kenny Robertson def. Sultan Aliev via TKO (strikes) at 2:42 of R1
Makwan Amirkhani def. Andy Ogle via TKO (strikes) at 0:08 of R1
Nikita Krylov def. Stanislav Nedkov via submission (guillotine) at 1:24 of R1
Mairbek Taisumov def. Anthony Christodoulou via knockout (strikes) at 0:38 of R2
Mirsad Bektic def. Paul Redmond via unanimous decision (30-27 x2, 30-25)
Viktor Pesta def. Konstantin Erokhin via unanimous decision (30-27 x2, 29-28)
Neil Seery def. Chris Beal via unanimous decision (30-27 x2, 29-28)

Alright, Nation … it’s been a rough week, so let’s try to have some fun tonight. After all, the majority of us aren’t in an arena watching MMA at 2 a.m. right now (much love to our readers from Sweden, as always).

Akira Corassani vs. Sam Sicilia

Round 1: No glove touch, and we’re off. Akira looking faster than usual, bouncy and light on his feet. Both guys trying to feel each other out, and it’s Sicilia that lands a nice hook. They jostle against the fence after both land hard shots in a flurry. Good leg kicks from Akira, and he gets nailed with a left hook shortly after throwing wildly. Akira catches a leg kick, and puts the hands on Sicilia. Akira comes in with an uppercut, but Sicilia stays out of the way. Akira looking agile, working on the outside, but not really troubling his opponent, either. Sicilia throws a counter, and both guys land on the chin. Akira comes in, they exchange and then he gets flattened by a humongous right hand. Akira hits the mat hard, out like a light. Very much like an H-Bomb…sign of things to come?

Sam Sicilia def. Akira Corassani via knockout (strikes) at 3:26 of R1

Phil Davis vs. Ryan Bader

Round 1: They touch gloves, both out orthodox. Bader pressuring Davis early, while Davis stays low and threatens with jabs. Bader rushes through, and lands one straight after throwing a number of punches. Bader clips Davis with a short, right hook, and pegs him back with a jab. Davis pushes for a takedown, and Bader defends. Kick to the body from Bader blocked, but he’s doing better than his foe on his feet. With that said, Davis lands a big overhead right. Davis goes to the body, while Bader misses an uppercut. Davis doesn’t allow himself to get too close to the fence, yet he’s allowing Bader to maneuver and settle in. The crowd rallying both fighters, as the action is a little slow. Davis tries to lock up Bader for a tussle, but the latter shakes him off. Davis with a kick to the body, and Bader just misses with a huge right hand. Davis now backing up Bader, with his lands low and looking to get on the inside without taking risks. Davis changes levels, but nothing big to end the round.

Round 2: Bader a little quicker to get to the center, and Davis’ movement is a little quicker, too. Davis is cutting the angles well. Davis goes for the takedown, but Bader defends and switches to a dominant position against the fence. Bader shrugs off Davis’ attempts, but Davis is relentless with the attempts. Davis locks him up, but then, Bader reverses and looks for a single leg. Davis has Bader’s back and in a weird position, Davis takes him down and he’s trying to take his back. Bader stands up, and he’s going for the single leg again. Davis has him up against the fence, attacking with weak knees to the body. Davis with a bit of stall, but Bader’s trying to fight out of the position.

Round 3: Davis back peddling, and Bader needs to really bring the fight to him now. He’s doing well, but Davis looks way to comfortable on the outside to risk anything. Jabs from Bader, and Davis is responding with low kicks. Bader trying to look for the parting shot, while Davis stays low and picks his shots without real conviction. Big right hand lands for Davis. Takedown attempt by Davis defended by Bader, and now the latter has him in a head lock. No submission attack, but Bader hits him with a knee on the way up. Another takedown stuffed from Bader. He may not be fazed when it comes to the wrestling attacks, but Bader looks too tired and confused to go for something big. Davis following Bader’s side-to-side shuffles, since there’s no urgency to counter. Davis with another solid right hand, followed by a big leg kick. Davis hurts Bader with a right hand, despite the latter staying on his feet and continuing to press forward. Bader getting a little more gritty with seconds left, and Davis rushes forward for the takedown. Bader reverses, and then scores a belly-to-back suplex. Davis’ right eye is almost swollen shut, but he should get the nod.

Ryan Bader def. Phil Davis by split decision (29-28×2, 28-29)

Meh, it’s fair, I guess. Neither guy really convinced anyone they were thirsty for blood. Moving on, these next two fights should be the business. Let’s hope it doesn’t take 20 minutes for the next bout.

Gegard Mousasi vs. Dan Henderson

Round 1: Mousasi working with jabs, and goes to hack at the legs. Pressuring with jabs, Mousasi is backing up the legend, and making him circle. Hendo is in familiar stance, and misses a big right hand. Mousasi clips Heno with a short right hook, and Hendo drops while stepping backwards. Mousasi follows up, and the ref stops it. Hendo protests, and while he was taking damage, like we know he can, it’s a bit of a controversial stoppage.

Gegard Mousasi def. Dan Henderson via TKO (strikes) at 1:10 of R1

That one sort of sucked the life out of the arena, and us at home. It’s not like Hendo can take a shot like he used to, though. Let’s get on with the main event. This one should be pretty freaking entertaining.

Alexander Gustafsson vs. Anthony Johnson

Round 1: Gusty attacks right off the bat with some kicks and a few jab attempts. Johnson is cutting down Gusty’s angles, and moving him back. They swing wildly, both landing in an exchange. AJ misses with a head kick, and Gusty lands a few jabs. An eyepoke to AJ stops the action for a bit. Gusty goes for a kick, and AJ drops him with a club. Gusty is back up, but he’s eating more right hands. AJ with a head kick, and he starts to pour on the pressure. Gusty tumbles on, and AJ is on his back, lacing him with uppercuts. Marc Goddard being kind, and Gusty is taking some clean shots on the ground. The ref steps in, and that’s that. Stockholm is silent, and the brass must be fuming. Rumble is for-fucking-real, holy crap.

Man, Gusty is crying on his cornerman’s shoulder. Christ almighty. Hard to watch. He also may or may not have shoved the camera out of his face. We got cut off for a second.

Anthony Johnson def. Alexander Gustafsson via TKO (strikes) at 2:15 of R1

That’s it for me, Nation. Stay strong, stay positive. We wake up tomorrow, and it’s a new day. It’s the best we can do. Much love, peace.

Cagepotato

UFC on FOX 14: Gustafsson vs. Johnson — Live Results & Commentary


(Alexander Gustafsson, Anthony Johnson, and DMX in the camouflage, ready to ask some hard-hitting questions./Photo via Getty)

The UFC showcase on FOX returns tonight for its 14th installment, featuring a huge light heavyweight title eliminator on deck. Alexander Gustafsson will be looking to book his rematch against Jon Jones, as he dukes it out against rising contender Anthony Johnson in the five-round main event inside Tele2 Arena in Stockholm, Sweden. The winner of this bout will most likely square off against the champion later this year.

In the co-main event, Dan Henderson will try to prove he’s not way over the hill like most of us think he is, as he faces Gegard Mousasi. Both combatants are coming off submission losses, looking to storm back into the win column. Also on the card, Phil Davis battles Ryan Bader, and kicking off the FOX action will be Akira Corassani vs. Sam Sicilia.

Our man Alex Giardini will be providing round-by-round UFC on FOX 14 results from the FOX main card, after the jump beginning at 8 p.m. ET / 5 p.m. PT. Refresh the page every few minutes for all the latest, and hit us up on twitter to share your own thoughts.

UFC on FOX 14 Preliminary Card Results:
Albert Tumenov def. Nico Musoke via unanimous decision (29-28×3)
Kenny Robertson def. Sultan Aliev via TKO (strikes) at 2:42 of R1
Makwan Amirkhani def. Andy Ogle via TKO (strikes) at 0:08 of R1
Nikita Krylov def. Stanislav Nedkov via submission (guillotine) at 1:24 of R1
Mairbek Taisumov def. Anthony Christodoulou via knockout (strikes) at 0:38 of R2
Mirsad Bektic def. Paul Redmond via unanimous decision (30-27 x2, 30-25)
Viktor Pesta def. Konstantin Erokhin via unanimous decision (30-27 x2, 29-28)
Neil Seery def. Chris Beal via unanimous decision (30-27 x2, 29-28)

Alright, Nation … it’s been a rough week, so let’s try to have some fun tonight. After all, the majority of us aren’t in an arena watching MMA at 2 a.m. right now (much love to our readers from Sweden, as always).

Akira Corassani vs. Sam Sicilia

Round 1: No glove touch, and we’re off. Akira looking faster than usual, bouncy and light on his feet. Both guys trying to feel each other out, and it’s Sicilia that lands a nice hook. They jostle against the fence after both land hard shots in a flurry. Good leg kicks from Akira, and he gets nailed with a left hook shortly after throwing wildly. Akira catches a leg kick, and puts the hands on Sicilia. Akira comes in with an uppercut, but Sicilia stays out of the way. Akira looking agile, working on the outside, but not really troubling his opponent, either. Sicilia throws a counter, and both guys land on the chin. Akira comes in, they exchange and then he gets flattened by a humongous right hand. Akira hits the mat hard, out like a light. Very much like an H-Bomb…sign of things to come?

Sam Sicilia def. Akira Corassani via knockout (strikes) at 3:26 of R1

Phil Davis vs. Ryan Bader

Round 1: They touch gloves, both out orthodox. Bader pressuring Davis early, while Davis stays low and threatens with jabs. Bader rushes through, and lands one straight after throwing a number of punches. Bader clips Davis with a short, right hook, and pegs him back with a jab. Davis pushes for a takedown, and Bader defends. Kick to the body from Bader blocked, but he’s doing better than his foe on his feet. With that said, Davis lands a big overhead right. Davis goes to the body, while Bader misses an uppercut. Davis doesn’t allow himself to get too close to the fence, yet he’s allowing Bader to maneuver and settle in. The crowd rallying both fighters, as the action is a little slow. Davis tries to lock up Bader for a tussle, but the latter shakes him off. Davis with a kick to the body, and Bader just misses with a huge right hand. Davis now backing up Bader, with his lands low and looking to get on the inside without taking risks. Davis changes levels, but nothing big to end the round.

Round 2: Bader a little quicker to get to the center, and Davis’ movement is a little quicker, too. Davis is cutting the angles well. Davis goes for the takedown, but Bader defends and switches to a dominant position against the fence. Bader shrugs off Davis’ attempts, but Davis is relentless with the attempts. Davis locks him up, but then, Bader reverses and looks for a single leg. Davis has Bader’s back and in a weird position, Davis takes him down and he’s trying to take his back. Bader stands up, and he’s going for the single leg again. Davis has him up against the fence, attacking with weak knees to the body. Davis with a bit of stall, but Bader’s trying to fight out of the position.

Round 3: Davis back peddling, and Bader needs to really bring the fight to him now. He’s doing well, but Davis looks way to comfortable on the outside to risk anything. Jabs from Bader, and Davis is responding with low kicks. Bader trying to look for the parting shot, while Davis stays low and picks his shots without real conviction. Big right hand lands for Davis. Takedown attempt by Davis defended by Bader, and now the latter has him in a head lock. No submission attack, but Bader hits him with a knee on the way up. Another takedown stuffed from Bader. He may not be fazed when it comes to the wrestling attacks, but Bader looks too tired and confused to go for something big. Davis following Bader’s side-to-side shuffles, since there’s no urgency to counter. Davis with another solid right hand, followed by a big leg kick. Davis hurts Bader with a right hand, despite the latter staying on his feet and continuing to press forward. Bader getting a little more gritty with seconds left, and Davis rushes forward for the takedown. Bader reverses, and then scores a belly-to-back suplex. Davis’ right eye is almost swollen shut, but he should get the nod.

Ryan Bader def. Phil Davis by split decision (29-28×2, 28-29)

Meh, it’s fair, I guess. Neither guy really convinced anyone they were thirsty for blood. Moving on, these next two fights should be the business. Let’s hope it doesn’t take 20 minutes for the next bout.

Gegard Mousasi vs. Dan Henderson

Round 1: Mousasi working with jabs, and goes to hack at the legs. Pressuring with jabs, Mousasi is backing up the legend, and making him circle. Hendo is in familiar stance, and misses a big right hand. Mousasi clips Heno with a short right hook, and Hendo drops while stepping backwards. Mousasi follows up, and the ref stops it. Hendo protests, and while he was taking damage, like we know he can, it’s a bit of a controversial stoppage.

Gegard Mousasi def. Dan Henderson via TKO (strikes) at 1:10 of R1

That one sort of sucked the life out of the arena, and us at home. It’s not like Hendo can take a shot like he used to, though. Let’s get on with the main event. This one should be pretty freaking entertaining.

Alexander Gustafsson vs. Anthony Johnson

Round 1: Gusty attacks right off the bat with some kicks and a few jab attempts. Johnson is cutting down Gusty’s angles, and moving him back. They swing wildly, both landing in an exchange. AJ misses with a head kick, and Gusty lands a few jabs. An eyepoke to AJ stops the action for a bit. Gusty goes for a kick, and AJ drops him with a club. Gusty is back up, but he’s eating more right hands. AJ with a head kick, and he starts to pour on the pressure. Gusty tumbles on, and AJ is on his back, lacing him with uppercuts. Marc Goddard being kind, and Gusty is taking some clean shots on the ground. The ref steps in, and that’s that. Stockholm is silent, and the brass must be fuming. Rumble is for-fucking-real, holy crap.

Man, Gusty is crying on his cornerman’s shoulder. Christ almighty. Hard to watch. He also may or may not have shoved the camera out of his face. We got cut off for a second.

Anthony Johnson def. Alexander Gustafsson via TKO (strikes) at 2:15 of R1

That’s it for me, Nation. Stay strong, stay positive. We wake up tomorrow, and it’s a new day. It’s the best we can do. Much love, peace.

Cagepotato

UFC Fight Night 59: McGregor vs. Siver — Live Results & Commentary


(Mouth like Chael, ass like Arianny. / Props: Getty)

Conor McGregor vs. Dennis Siver isn’t so much a “fight” as it is a blatant showcase for an exciting young talent, against an opponent who’s about as hand-picked as they come. If all goes according to plan tonight in Boston, McGregor will score a dominant win and earn a title shot against Jose Aldo in a soccer stadium. If Siver wins…who knows? I mean, I’ll laugh my ass off, but beyond that? Hard to say.

Luckily, tonight’s co-main event should be far more competitive. Will Donald Cerrone finally “go get some!” against Benson Henderson, the former WEC/UFC champion who has beaten him twice before? Or will they just hug and stuff?

Our man Alex Giardini will be providing round-by-round UFC Fight Night 59 results from the FOX Sports 1 main card, after the jump beginning at 10 p.m. ET / 7 p.m. PT. Refresh the page every few minutes for all the latest, and hit us up on twitter to share your own thoughts.

UFC Fight Night 59 Preliminary Card Results
Cathal Pendred def. Sean Spencer via unanimous decision (29-28, 30-27×2)
Lorenz Larkin def. John Howard via TKO (strikes) at 2:17 of R1
Chris Wade def. Zhang Lipeng via unanimous decision (30-26 x3)
Patrick Holohan def. Shane Howell via unanimous decision (30-27 x3)
Johnny Case def. Frankie Perez via TKO (strikes) at 1:54 of R3
Charles Rosa def. Sean Soriano via submission (D’arce choke) at 4:43 of R3
Sean O’Connell def. Matt Van Buren via TKO (strikes) at 2:11 of R3
Joby Sanchez def. Tateki Matsuda via split decision (29-28, 28-29, 30-27)

Alright, Potato Nation … just had to go puke because of that Carl Pendred-Sean Spencer decision, but we’re pretty psyched about the “Irish Muhammad Ali” vs. the “German Barry Horowitz.” Stay for a while, and let’s do the damn thing.

Holy Christ, we’re getting a McGregor hype video before the first fight. The fight was also proclaimed as the “biggest featherweight fight in history.”

Norman Parke vs. Gleison Tibau

Round 1:

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UFC on FOX 13: Dos Santos vs. Miocic — Live Results & Commentary


(“Someday *I’ll* be big, and you’ll have to listen to *me*!” — That kid in the background. / Photo via Getty)

Fresh off of last night’s TUF 20 Finale card which focused on strawweights and lightweights, the UFC is on the scene in Phoenix tonight with a FOX card focusing on heavyweights and Diazweights. Yes indeedy, it’s time for UFC on FOX 13, and the big boys will be doing their thing: Ex-heavyweight champion Junior Dos Santos faces off against top contender Stipe Miocic in the main event, while Alistair Overeem and Stefan Struve do their best to get back in the win column. But first, Matt Mitrione will see if his magical shoulder tackle works on Gabriel Gonzaga.

Our friend Alex Giardini will be furiously typing out round-by-round results from the “Dos Santos vs. Miocic” main card after the jump, beginning at 8 p.m. ET / 5 p.m. PT. Refresh the page every few minutes for all the latest, and tell us how you’re feeling on twitter @cagepotatomma. Cheers!

Preliminary Card Results
- Joanna Jedrzejczyk def. Claudia Gadelha via split decision (28-29, 29-28×2)
- John Moraga def. Willie Gates via submission (rear-naked choke) at 4:06 of R3
- Ben Saunders def. Joe Riggs via submission (injury) at 0:57 of R1
- Drew Dober def. Jamie Varner via submission (rear-naked choke) at 1:52 of R1
- Derek Brunson vs. Ed Herman  (Canceled due to Brunson suffering from food poisoning)
- Bryan Barberena def. Joe Ellenberger via TKO (strikes) at 3:24 of R3
- David Michaud def. Garett Whiteley via unanimous decision (30-27, 29-28×2)
- Henry Cejudo def. Dustin Kimura via unanimous decision (30-27×3)
- Ian Entwistle def. Anthony Birchak via submission (heel hook) at 1:04 of R1

Welcome to the UFC on FOX 13 liveblog. Stay a while, share some laughs, and pray for some saucy scraps. It’s been a pretty eventful evening thus far to say the least, so let’s hope the trend continues.

Gabriel Gonzaga vs. Matt Mitrione

Round 1: Mitrione declines to touch gloves, and starts talking to him. Mitrione is bouncy on the feet, but gets caught by a right hand from Gonzaga. Mitrione lands a sharp jab, keeping up with his footwork. Gonzaga steps on Mitrione’s foot, and the latter starts to back up. Gonzaga starting to walk him down. Both heavyweights are swinging wildly, but missing most of their punches. Mitrione staggers Gonzaga with a brutal left hand, and the Brazilian goes down on all fours. Mitrione lacing him with shots, and Gonzaga tries to get up but is brought down again. It’s all over, and the man formerly known as “Meathead” gets the job done.

Matt Mitrione def. Gabriel Gonzaga via TKO (strikes) at 1:59 of R1

Alistair Overeem vs. Stefan Struve 

Round 1: Struve backing Overeem to the fence, but no strikes thrown yet. They lock up, with Overeem pitting Struve against the cage. Struve lands a kick to the body, followed by a knee. Overeem just grazes his foe with a right hand, and locks up Struve, tossing him to the ground and in full guard. Right hand from Overeem, while Struve is on his back and trying to control the wrists. Overeem stands up, and falls back into the closed guard. Overeem postures up again, rocking Struve with right hands. Overeem landing a bunch of punches to the downed Struve, who eventually goes out, forcing “Big” John to step in.

Alistair Overeem def. Stefan Struve via knockout (strikes) at 4:13 of R2

Up next, Jon Jones joins the FOX broadcast team (including Daniel Cormier) for an interview…

So, they begin by playing montage featuring the brawl that was so bad for the sport, and Brian Stann starts to break down Jones and Cormier at UFC 182. They show more footage of the feud, and Rogan takes it away next to Cormier, while Jones is live via satellite (like The Rock). When asked about the brawl, Jones admits he’d go after Cormier the way he did again, and Cormier feels the same way. Rogan asks each fighter a question, and Cormier says he’s going to make Jon Jones quit, while the champ laughs it off and says Cormier has a job as a commentator for a reason. Not much else to note about the conversation, and the focus switches to Dana White, who starts to sell the fight even further for whatever reason. Let’s get on with the show, for the love of Jesus.

The crowd starts doing the wave in the background…the f*cking wave.

Rafael dos Anjos vs. Nate Diaz

Round 1: The crowd starts to get behind the Stockton fighter, while RDA hits Diaz with a leg kick. They trade right hands, both connecting. Diaz working his jab, but gets hit by a combo from RDA. Leg kick checked from Diaz, but he’s getting hit repeatedly in the lead leg. Good combination from RDA, and Diaz gets a left hook in. Diaz switches stances after taking a brutal leg kick, and Rogan is eluding to Diaz being in trouble. Both lightweights are duking it out in the center, and RDA is landing a little more. Diaz lands a left, followed by a right, but limps backwards after another lethal kick to his legs. Diaz switching stances, and gets a takedown stuffed. RDA joins him on the ground, working from side control. RDA controls the back and threatens with hammerfists, but Diaz rolls underneath and tries to lock up RDA’s foot for a lock. RDA moves out of danger, rejoining Diaz on the mat and into side control with elbows.

Round 2: RDA wastes no time in going back to the lead leg, and goes to the body with his shots, too. Diaz is backing up from the shots, and RDA is just hacking away at the leg. Diaz is essentially on one leg right now, and he’s much slower in his attack. RDA backs Diaz up with a string of punches, and takes him down near the fence. Diaz is trying to get back to his feet, while the Brazilian is sticking to him like glue and charging him against the cage. Big knee to the body from RDA, followed by a couple of leg kicks on the break. Diaz is doing much better with his punches, but he can’t really trouble RDA at this point with one leg. RDA hits him with a kick to the chest, and Diaz goes down. RDA closes the round on top of his opponent.

Round 3: Diaz is trying to get flashy, yet RDA is still pestering him with a diverse attack. RDA has Diaz on the mat, and starts to work elbows from the guard. RDA stands up, and hacks at Diaz’s legs while the latter is still on his back. RDA is switching from side control and into Diaz’s guard, trying to gain a little bit of an edge. Diaz is doing well on his back, but surviving at this point. RDA stands back up, and goes right back down to trouble Diaz some more. Diaz is cut open on the forehead, and he starts to slap RDA. The Brazilian slaps him back, and starts to hammer him with ground and pound. The buzzer sounds, and RDA puts his hands up. Diaz either put his hands up, or flipped off the crowd in true Lesnar vs. Goldberg fashion.

Rafael dos Anjos def. Nate Diaz via unanimous decision (30-27, 30-26×2)

Main event coming up next, but we have to check in with Karyn Bryant first. This might take a while.

Junior dos Santos vs. Stipe Miocic

Round 1: Big right hand from JDS to open things up, and Miocic moves in for the clinch. Miocic has JDS against the cage, working a single leg. Nice left and an uppercut from the American in the clinch, and they separate. Miocic goes for the hips again, and gets stuffed, but Miocic tagged JDS a couple of times and had him hurt. JDS recovers, hitting Miocic with a right hand of his own. Jab stifles JDS, but he nails Miocic with a solid left hook. Right hand from Miocic rocks JDS, and Miocic goes for the tsakedown again. They break, and both dudes are swinging for the fences, both being rocked from right hands. Right hook from JDS over the top, and then an uppercut. Right hand staggers JDS, and Miocic has the Brazilian against the cage in the clinch. Some pretty impressive stuff from Miocic thus far. JDS clips Miocic with a few left hooks to close out the round.

Round 2: Miocic tries the takedown once more, but gets stuffed. Kick to the body from Miocic, and while he goes for the takedown again, JDS laces him with a few hammerfists. JDS now has Miocic pitted against the fence, but breaks away. Things have slowed down a bit here. Miocic doing a good job of sliding away from the punches, and gets some clean punches in while cutting on the inside. JDS misses with an overhead right, and the Brazilian is busted up quite badly around the eyes. They break from the clinch and throw bombs at each other. JDS nails Miocic with a left hook, and they’re back in the center. It looks like JDS’ gas is slowly starting to run out, but he’s still in there. Right hand from Miocic backs JDS against the fence. Takedown for Miocic, and he takes the back. JDS is up in no time, but his face is a mess.

Round 3: Miocic threatens with a takedown again, and secures it after a second try. JDS had his back and reversed positioning, but couldn’t do anything before Miocic got back to his feet. Both dudes breathing heavy. JDS missing most of his punches, while Miocic is keeping away from the dangerous punches. Both heavyweights working the jab, as JDS goes to the body a little more. JDS blasts Miocic with a left hand and drops him. Miocic is bloodied, but back on his feet and moving forward. Miocic has a takedown stuffed. JDS starting to get back into the groove, while his foe is going to the body often. JDS with a solid right hand to close the round.

Round 4: Kick to the gonads from Miocic to get us started in round four. They resume, and JDS backs up the American with jabs. Miocic relentlessly working the takedown attempt, yet JDS stays on his feet. Right hand for JDS, and things are a little more calculated from both guys right now. Combination lands for JDS. Miocic still walking him down and pressuring the former champion. Miocic backs JDS up all the way across the cage with punches, and the Brazilian gets his back off the cage and sends the action back to the center. Miocic tags JDS with a right hand, following up with big shots that have JDS on wobbly legs. JDS returns the favor with a right and survives the scare. JDS scores a takedown from out of nowhere, setting up shop in the guard. Miocic hits the switch and he’s back on his feet. JDS comes on strong to close the round, but Miocic stays grounded.

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UFC Fight Night 57: Edgar vs. Swanson — Main Card Results & Commentary

The UFC is live in Austin, Texas, tonight with a lineup of crowd-pleasing fighters and a featherweight main event that could maybe produce the next title challenger, particularly if Conor McGregor isn’t available. On tonight’s menu: Frankie Edgar vs. Cub Swanson in the headliner spot, with a side order of Bobby Green vs. Edson Barboza, and a light dusting of Joseph Benavidez, Brad Pickett, and Jared Rosholt. Should be pretty okay.

The UFC Fight Night 57 main card kicks off on FOX Sports 1 at 10 p.m. ET / 7 p.m. PT, and our old friend Matt Kaplan will be stickin’ round-by-round results after the jump. Refresh the page every few minutes for all the latest, and shoot us your own thoughts in the comments section or on twitter @cagepotatomma. Thanks for being here.

UFC Fight Night 57 Preliminary Card Results
- Ruslan Magomedov def. Josh Copeland via unanimous decision (29-28, 30-27 x2)
- Roger Narvaez def. Luke Barnatt via split-decision (29-28 x 2, 28-29)
- James Vick def. Nick Hein via unanimous decision (30-27, 29-28 x 2)
- Akbarh Arreola def. Yves Edwards via submission (armbar), 1:52 of round 1
- Paige VanZant def. Kailin Curran via TKO, 2:54 of round 3
- Doo Ho Choi def. Juan Manuel Puig via TKO, 0:18 of round 1

MATT WIMAN VS. ISAAC VALLIE-FLAGG

Rd. 1 -

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