Tag Archive for Cejudo

UFC Flyweight Contender Henry Cejudo Inducted into National Wrestling Hall of Fame

Before he became one of the Ultimate Fighting Championship’s top flyweight contenders, Henry Cejudo was a decorated wrestler at the amateur level.
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Henry Cejudo Believes Demetrious Johnson Could Easily Defeat T.J. Dillashaw

Former flyweight title challenger Henry Cejudo has weighed in with his thoughts on the outcome of a potential superfight between the current Ultimate Fighting Championship 125-pound champion Demetrious Johnson and bantamweight ace T.J. Dillashaw.
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UFC 218 results from last night: Henry Cejudo vs Sergio Pettis fight recap

Ultimate Fighting Championship (UFC) Flyweight contenders Henry Cejudo and Sergio Pettis squared off last night (Dec. 2, 2017) at UFC 218 inside the Little Caesars Arena in Detroit, Michigan.

Cejudo’s striking in his last pair of bouts changed the scene even if one of them was a loss. Previous to those fights, Cejudo was a long ways off from a rematch with “Mighty Mouse,” but his improvements were so dramatic that Cejudo already was back in a title eliminator match up.

On the other hand, Pettis has developed into a surprisingly sound title contender. He was still a bit raw when the UFC first picked him up — understandable given his age — but “SP” came into this clash with four-straight wins and a fair bit of momentum behind him.

Both men worked from wide stances, but Pettis operated as a Southpaw. Early on, Pettis was exceptionally sharp, as he fired crisp jabs, long kicks, and landed a counter left early. Cejudo took note as well, dropping down into a double leg and spinning his opponent to the mat.

Once on top, Cejudo showed his world class wrestling. Pettis tried to turtle and stand, but Cejudo repeatedly sat him back to his hip or spun to the front head lock. It was really a masterclass in top control, as he allowed Pettis to build up a bit before snapping him back down.

The Olympian didn’t do a ton of damage until the final 10 seconds, but he clearly captured the first round.

Listening to his coach’s corner advice, Pettis fired more kicks at the start of the second. They landed heavily, and Pettis continued to look sharp, jabbing and stuffing his foe’s first takedown attempt.

Unfortunately, a slip sent Pettis to the mat, and Cejudo jumped on him. This time, Pettis did a better job of maintaining guard in search of a stand up. It didn’t happen, but Pettis was able to get back to his feet with 45 seconds remaining.

He wasn’t able to get much going before the end of the round, meaning Cejudo was most likely up 2-0 with five minutes remaining.

Pettis stood his ground in the pocket in search of a big shot, and both men landed as a result. The straights of “SP” were landing best, but a single leg from the Olympian planted Pettis on his back once more.

Pettis was trapped in turtle and guard for the third time, this time able to stand up with 70 seconds remaining for Pettis to score a finish. The kickboxer slowly advanced and intently looked for opportunities, but Cejudo kept his guard high and feinted for takedowns.

Pettis didn’t find his moment, and Cejudo was awarded the decision.

There’s not too much to analyze from Cejudo. Whenever he got deep on a shot, he sent his opponent to the mat. Once there, Cejudo’s control was excellent, as he made Pettis carry his weight and stole his energy.

I don’t know how much it says about his ability to rematch Demetrious Johnson successfully, but a 30-27 win over a top contender is still a big deal.

For Sergio Pettis, this critique is going to sound pretty rude, as it’s really the ultimate case of “easier said than done.” Pettis’ biggest issue was an inability to get up from takedowns quickly, and a partial reason for that was Pettis attempt to stand/scramble from the turtle without fighting hands first. Against a good wrestler — a description very safely applied to Cejudo — it’s absolutely imperative to break the grip and control a hand before attempting to get up.

Otherwise, you’ll be yanked, snapped, and slammed backed to the ground unceremoniously.

For the first minute of every round, Pettis’ kickboxing was nasty. He was the sharper man who made the most of his range, but he just couldn’t keep it on the feet long enough for that to matter.

Last night, Henry Cejudo reverted to his wrestling roots to dominate his opponent. How do you like Cejudo’s chances in a rematch opposite the Flyweight kingpin?

For complete UFC 218: “Holloway vs. Aldo 2” results and play-by-play, click HERE!

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Henry Cejudo Flees Fire, Promises He’ll Still Fight at UFC 218

Apparently those wildfires raging in Northern California are no joke – as Olympic wrestler and flyweight title contender Henry Cejudo learned when he found himself fleeing the flames in the middle of the night. It is literally a story that could be plucked from a bad writing class. Take it away, MMAJunkie: MMAjunkie today spoke […]

The post Henry Cejudo Flees Fire, Promises He’ll Still Fight at UFC 218 appeared first on Caged Insider.

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Henry Cejudo Flees Fire, Promises He’ll Still Fight at UFC 218

Apparently those wildfires raging in Northern California are no joke – as Olympic wrestler and flyweight title contender Henry Cejudo learned when he found himself fleeing the flames in the middle of the night. It is literally a story that could be plucked from a bad writing class. Take it away, MMAJunkie: MMAjunkie today spoke […]

The post Henry Cejudo Flees Fire, Promises He’ll Still Fight at UFC 218 appeared first on Caged Insider.

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Henry Cejudo Burns Right Foot, Loses Olympic Gold Medal in California Wildfire Evacuation

Ultimate Fighting Championship flyweight Henry Cejudo has been burned but he’s not broken.
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Henry Cejudo vs. Wilson Reis, Sarah Moras vs. Ashlee Evans-Smith set for UFC 216

The UFC has added two new bouts to its UFC 216 fight card.

A high-profile flyweight bout between former title challengers Henry Cejudo and Wilson Reis, and a women’s bantamweight fight between Sarah Moras and Ashlee Evans-Smith has been scheduled for the Canadian card, which to go down on Sept. 9 at Rogers Place in Edmonton, Alberta. The news was first reported by TSN on Wednesday, and was later confirmed by the UFC.

Cejudo will be attempting to break a two-fight skid that includes a loss to the champion Demetrious Johnson and most recently a controversial split-decision loss to Joseph Benavidez. The 30-year-old Olympic wrestler is currently 10-2 in his MMA career, and finds himself ranked second at flyweight. Meanwhile, Reis, who’s ranked fourth, is coming off a submission loss Johnson in April. Prior to that, the Brazilian was on a three-fight win streak.

In the women’s bantamweight bout, Canada’s Sarah Moras will be returning to the Octagon after being more than two years away from competition. Moras’ last fight was a loss to now-strawweight Jessica Andrade at UFC Fight Night 71 back in July 2015. Her opponent Evans-Smith will also be attempting to come back from a loss as she dropped a decision to Ketlen Vieira in April.

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Former Flyweight Title Challengers Henry Cejudo, Wilson Reis to Clash at UFC 216

Henry Cejudo will square off against Wilson Reis in a battle of former flyweight No. 1 contenders at UFC 216.
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UFC 211: Will Henry Cejudo Shutdown The Young And Hungry Sergio Pettis

The main card of UFC 211 features two top level flyweights, each of whom could be considered for a title challenge with a few more good wins. While Henry Cejudo may have already had his crack at glory, Sergio Pettis is looking to throw his card into the Demetrious Johnson sweepstakes (a prize that I’m not sure anyone truly wants to win at this point). This fight has a lot riding on it for both fighters and it’s good to see it opening up the main card for one of the more stacked events of the year (good job UFC, keep this up and people may end up caring about flyweight).

Henry Cejudo has the tools to give anyone at 125 lbs tons of issues. His mix of gritty, powerful and technical wrestling has matched well with his kickboxing style. Cejudo showed in his bout with Joseph Benavidez that he has the ability to go three hard rounds against a tactical and fast paced opponent. His kicking game was also very impressive. The biggest flaw in that fight however was how much power he threw into every shot. If he learns to fight at a more measured pace, picking his shots, flashing the jab to control distance, and level changes when Pettis over commits, we could see Cejudo put on a dominant performance.

The plan of attack for Cejudo should be fairly straight forward. Takedowns will play a major role, as will controlling the clinch and landing heavy punches on the break. Cejudo is likely to have a strength advantage here and he needs to let Pettis understand that as soon as the first bell rings. Cejudo fell in love with his power a bit in his bout with Joseph Benavidez and he’ll want to avoid that here. Basic boxing combinations like the double jab cross will be effective in this fight. He’ll need to stay in Pettis’ face and stay busy the whole time in order prevent the younger man from trying to control the distance. Pettis wants distance which means Cejudo needs to make him feel claustrophobic and fight in a phone booth. Ending combinations with either a left hook or right round kick will do Cejudo a ton of good.

Sergio Pettis may not have the flash and flare of his older brother, but he does indeed have a more complete game. The younger Pettis looks to mix up his attack with sharp striking coupled with some nicely timed level changes. Rather than just focus purely on knocking opponents out, Pettis likes to employ a game that keeps his opposition guessing. He’s as likely to fire off a blistering head kick as he is to shoot for a takedown.

The goal for Pettis here is to frustrate Cejudo and get his distance with kicks immediately before the Olympic wrestler can get comfortable. While kicking against a wrestler can be ill advised, if you get the distance just right it can keep the shorter Cejudo on the outside. The benefit of Sergio Pettis being from a traditional martial arts background means that he has the ability to throw strikes from both stances. It will allow him to confuse Cejudo and, once his opponent is bewildered, land a devastating rear round kick or cross from the southpaw stance.

Most important for Pettis is to ensure his feet keep moving. The younger Pettis has a tendency to stand still at times which can get him into all kinds of trouble with a power puncher and wrestler of Cejudo’s caliber.

Which flyweight will take one step closer to punching their ticket for the Demetrious Johnson horror show?


Jonathan Salmon is a writer, martial arts instructor, and geek culture enthusiast. Check out his Twitter and Facebook to keep up with his antics.

The post UFC 211: Will Henry Cejudo Shutdown The Young And Hungry Sergio Pettis appeared first on Cagepotato.

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UFC 211: Will Henry Cejudo Shutdown The Young And Hungry Sergio Pettis

The main card of UFC 211 features two top level flyweights, each of whom could be considered for a title challenge with a few more good wins. While Henry Cejudo may have already had his crack at glory, Sergio Pettis is looking to throw his card into the Demetrious Johnson sweepstakes (a prize that I’m not sure anyone truly wants to win at this point). This fight has a lot riding on it for both fighters and it’s good to see it opening up the main card for one of the more stacked events of the year (good job UFC, keep this up and people may end up caring about flyweight).

Henry Cejudo has the tools to give anyone at 125 lbs tons of issues. His mix of gritty, powerful and technical wrestling has matched well with his kickboxing style. Cejudo showed in his bout with Joseph Benavidez that he has the ability to go three hard rounds against a tactical and fast paced opponent. His kicking game was also very impressive. The biggest flaw in that fight however was how much power he threw into every shot. If he learns to fight at a more measured pace, picking his shots, flashing the jab to control distance, and level changes when Pettis over commits, we could see Cejudo put on a dominant performance.

The plan of attack for Cejudo should be fairly straight forward. Takedowns will play a major role, as will controlling the clinch and landing heavy punches on the break. Cejudo is likely to have a strength advantage here and he needs to let Pettis understand that as soon as the first bell rings. Cejudo fell in love with his power a bit in his bout with Joseph Benavidez and he’ll want to avoid that here. Basic boxing combinations like the double jab cross will be effective in this fight. He’ll need to stay in Pettis’ face and stay busy the whole time in order prevent the younger man from trying to control the distance. Pettis wants distance which means Cejudo needs to make him feel claustrophobic and fight in a phone booth. Ending combinations with either a left hook or right round kick will do Cejudo a ton of good.

Sergio Pettis may not have the flash and flare of his older brother, but he does indeed have a more complete game. The younger Pettis looks to mix up his attack with sharp striking coupled with some nicely timed level changes. Rather than just focus purely on knocking opponents out, Pettis likes to employ a game that keeps his opposition guessing. He’s as likely to fire off a blistering head kick as he is to shoot for a takedown.

The goal for Pettis here is to frustrate Cejudo and get his distance with kicks immediately before the Olympic wrestler can get comfortable. While kicking against a wrestler can be ill advised, if you get the distance just right it can keep the shorter Cejudo on the outside. The benefit of Sergio Pettis being from a traditional martial arts background means that he has the ability to throw strikes from both stances. It will allow him to confuse Cejudo and, once his opponent is bewildered, land a devastating rear round kick or cross from the southpaw stance.

Most important for Pettis is to ensure his feet keep moving. The younger Pettis has a tendency to stand still at times which can get him into all kinds of trouble with a power puncher and wrestler of Cejudo’s caliber.

Which flyweight will take one step closer to punching their ticket for the Demetrious Johnson horror show?


Jonathan Salmon is a writer, martial arts instructor, and geek culture enthusiast. Check out his Twitter and Facebook to keep up with his antics.

The post UFC 211: Will Henry Cejudo Shutdown The Young And Hungry Sergio Pettis appeared first on Cagepotato.

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