Tag Archive for Case

Greg Hardy, The UFC and the Case of the Missing Moral Compass

The latest season of “Dana White’s Tuesday Night Contender Series” kicked off last night. That alone would be news that barely moves the needle, because, well, it’s just fights between dudes hoping to get a UFC contract. But there was someone noteworthy in the cage for this first episode – although his noteworthiness stems from some ugly extracurricular activities in a prior profession.

Greg Hardy played pro football, and while he was with the Dallas Cowboys, he got arrested for some harrowing domestic violence charges. Ultimately, he was found guilty, but on appeal the charges were dropped because the complainant (his ex-girlfriend) failed to testify. This sort of thing happens often, and can stem from a victim having a change of heart about pursuing all avenues of criminal prosecution. It can even happen from victims getting intimidated, or reaching some form of out-of-court agreement involving stacks of cash and/or gold doubloons.

When it was announced that Hardy was going to participate in DWTNCS, there was a bit of an uproar in certain media circles. Why would the UFC even consider letting someone accused of domestic violence in the door of the TUF Gym?

That uproar reached a fever pitch last night, and when Hardy knocked out his opponent, and earned himself a UFC contract, the story line was suddenly about how the UFC – a multi-billion dollar corporation built on the backs of men and women paid to beat the crap out of each other – lacked a moral compass. How could they do this? How could Dana White justify it?

The truth is, it’s not White’s – or the UFC’s – job to be the moral compass of the sport. Sure, the UFC is largely responsible for getting the sport legalized nearly everywhere, and they’ve given fighters the boot for everything from tweets made in poor taste to outright nasty conduct inside and outside of the cage. But they’ve also turned a blind eye to the crimes and misdemeanors of their biggest star, Conor McGregor. And they can. They can do all of that stuff. There really is no obligation for them to make sure all of their fighters are saints, or even a duty to just make sure their fighters have never been accused of laying a hand on a female.

Being mad at the UFC for giving Hardy a contract is fine. Don’t watch any UFC events that Hardy takes part in. Or do. It honestly doesn’t matter, because either way the fights are going to happen. People are going to tune in to watch Hardy “redeem” himself, or get his comeuppance, and the UFC knows this, just like they know people will watch McGregor no matter how many windows the Irishman smashes.

Personally, when Hardy gets enough experience and steps into the Octagon proper for a real fight on a real UFC event, I think it’ll be great. Because I’ll be rooting for the other guy – regardless of who that other guy is.

Welcome to the fight business, folks. If you want to soak up something less amoral, volunteer at a soup kitchen.

The post Greg Hardy, The UFC and the Case of the Missing Moral Compass appeared first on Caged Insider.

Caged Insider

Greg Hardy, The UFC and the Case of the Missing Moral Compass

The latest season of “Dana White’s Tuesday Night Contender Series” kicked off last night. That alone would be news that barely moves the needle, because, well, it’s just fights between dudes hoping to get a UFC contract. But there was someone noteworthy in the cage for this first episode – although his noteworthiness stems from some ugly extracurricular activities in a prior profession.

Greg Hardy played pro football, and while he was with the Dallas Cowboys, he got arrested for some harrowing domestic violence charges. Ultimately, he was found guilty, but on appeal the charges were dropped because the complainant (his ex-girlfriend) failed to testify. This sort of thing happens often, and can stem from a victim having a change of heart about pursuing all avenues of criminal prosecution. It can even happen from victims getting intimidated, or reaching some form of out-of-court agreement involving stacks of cash and/or gold doubloons.

When it was announced that Hardy was going to participate in DWTNCS, there was a bit of an uproar in certain media circles. Why would the UFC even consider letting someone accused of domestic violence in the door of the TUF Gym?

That uproar reached a fever pitch last night, and when Hardy knocked out his opponent, and earned himself a UFC contract, the story line was suddenly about how the UFC – a multi-billion dollar corporation built on the backs of men and women paid to beat the crap out of each other – lacked a moral compass. How could they do this? How could Dana White justify it?

The truth is, it’s not White’s – or the UFC’s – job to be the moral compass of the sport. Sure, the UFC is largely responsible for getting the sport legalized nearly everywhere, and they’ve given fighters the boot for everything from tweets made in poor taste to outright nasty conduct inside and outside of the cage. But they’ve also turned a blind eye to the crimes and misdemeanors of their biggest star, Conor McGregor. And they can. They can do all of that stuff. There really is no obligation for them to make sure all of their fighters are saints, or even a duty to just make sure their fighters have never been accused of laying a hand on a female.

Being mad at the UFC for giving Hardy a contract is fine. Don’t watch any UFC events that Hardy takes part in. Or do. It honestly doesn’t matter, because either way the fights are going to happen. People are going to tune in to watch Hardy “redeem” himself, or get his comeuppance, and the UFC knows this, just like they know people will watch McGregor no matter how many windows the Irishman smashes.

Personally, when Hardy gets enough experience and steps into the Octagon proper for a real fight on a real UFC event, I think it’ll be great. Because I’ll be rooting for the other guy – regardless of who that other guy is.

Welcome to the fight business, folks. If you want to soak up something less amoral, volunteer at a soup kitchen.

The post Greg Hardy, The UFC and the Case of the Missing Moral Compass appeared first on Caged Insider.

Caged Insider

Greg Hardy, The UFC and the Case of the Missing Moral Compass

The latest season of “Dana White’s Tuesday Night Contender Series” kicked off last night. That alone would be news that barely moves the needle, because, well, it’s just fights between dudes hoping to get a UFC contract. But there was someone noteworthy in the cage for this first episode – although his noteworthiness stems from some ugly extracurricular activities in a prior profession.

Greg Hardy played pro football, and while he was with the Dallas Cowboys, he got arrested for some harrowing domestic violence charges. Ultimately, he was found guilty, but on appeal the charges were dropped because the complainant (his ex-girlfriend) failed to testify. This sort of thing happens often, and can stem from a victim having a change of heart about pursuing all avenues of criminal prosecution. It can even happen from victims getting intimidated, or reaching some form of out-of-court agreement involving stacks of cash and/or gold doubloons.

When it was announced that Hardy was going to participate in DWTNCS, there was a bit of an uproar in certain media circles. Why would the UFC even consider letting someone accused of domestic violence in the door of the TUF Gym?

That uproar reached a fever pitch last night, and when Hardy knocked out his opponent, and earned himself a UFC contract, the story line was suddenly about how the UFC – a multi-billion dollar corporation built on the backs of men and women paid to beat the crap out of each other – lacked a moral compass. How could they do this? How could Dana White justify it?

The truth is, it’s not White’s – or the UFC’s – job to be the moral compass of the sport. Sure, the UFC is largely responsible for getting the sport legalized nearly everywhere, and they’ve given fighters the boot for everything from tweets made in poor taste to outright nasty conduct inside and outside of the cage. But they’ve also turned a blind eye to the crimes and misdemeanors of their biggest star, Conor McGregor. And they can. They can do all of that stuff. There really is no obligation for them to make sure all of their fighters are saints, or even a duty to just make sure their fighters have never been accused of laying a hand on a female.

Being mad at the UFC for giving Hardy a contract is fine. Don’t watch any UFC events that Hardy takes part in. Or do. It honestly doesn’t matter, because either way the fights are going to happen. People are going to tune in to watch Hardy “redeem” himself, or get his comeuppance, and the UFC knows this, just like they know people will watch McGregor no matter how many windows the Irishman smashes.

Personally, when Hardy gets enough experience and steps into the Octagon proper for a real fight on a real UFC event, I think it’ll be great. Because I’ll be rooting for the other guy – regardless of who that other guy is.

Welcome to the fight business, folks. If you want to soak up something less amoral, volunteer at a soup kitchen.

The post Greg Hardy, The UFC and the Case of the Missing Moral Compass appeared first on Caged Insider.

Caged Insider

Conor McGregor Is Headed To New York For His Court Case

The big week is here where we get to find out what legal repercussions McGregor will face for his UFC 223 bus attack.

It’s been two months almost to the day since Conor McGregor and a gang of his friends stormed a loading dock in Brooklyn’s Barclays Center, attacking a bus containing UFC 223 fighters. That behavior landed him in jail and resulted in three counts of assault and one count of criminal mischief. On June 14th McGregor will return to a New York courtroom to face those charges, and according to his social media he’ll be back in the US this Tuesday.

His travel plans were revealed in a tweet celebrating SBG teammate Cian Cowley’s first round knockout win at BraveCF 13 in Belfast. Cowley also happens to be the other member of McGregor’s entourage facing criminal charges over the bus attack. If McGregor was worried about the repercussions of their actions in court, he didn’t show it.

”Jet leaves Tuesday my brother,” he wrote. “Have a good one!”

According to legal experts, McGregor could be looking at anything from jail time, a felony on his record, or nothing at all if a good plea deal is reached. If we were betting people, we would probably lean towards McGregor getting off with a slap on the hand. Funny how that seems to be the case when dealing with multi-millionaires, isn’t it? But in this case, we won’t complain too much about the state of the justice system. The sooner all this is behind us, the sooner it’s Khabib Time.

MMAmania.com – All Posts

Conor McGregor Is Headed To New York For His Court Case

The big week is here where we get to find out what legal repercussions McGregor will face for his UFC 223 bus attack.

It’s been two months almost to the day since Conor McGregor and a gang of his friends stormed a loading dock in Brooklyn’s Barclays Center, attacking a bus containing UFC 223 fighters. That behavior landed him in jail and resulted in three counts of assault and one count of criminal mischief. On June 14th McGregor will return to a New York courtroom to face those charges, and according to his social media he’ll be back in the US this Tuesday.

His travel plans were revealed in a tweet celebrating SBG teammate Cian Cowley’s first round knockout win at BraveCF 13 in Belfast. Cowley also happens to be the other member of McGregor’s entourage facing criminal charges over the bus attack. If McGregor was worried about the repercussions of their actions in court, he didn’t show it.

”Jet leaves Tuesday my brother,” he wrote. “Have a good one!”

According to legal experts, McGregor could be looking at anything from jail time, a felony on his record, or nothing at all if a good plea deal is reached. If we were betting people, we would probably lean towards McGregor getting off with a slap on the hand. Funny how that seems to be the case when dealing with multi-millionaires, isn’t it? But in this case, we won’t complain too much about the state of the justice system. The sooner all this is behind us, the sooner it’s Khabib Time.

MMAmania.com – All Posts

Midnight Mania! Frank Mir Testified In Police Chokehold Death Case

Bringing you the weird and wild from the world of MMA each and every weeknight

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Frank Mir gave a testimony before a grand jury on behalf of former Las Vegas Metro Police Department officer Kenneth Lopera, who has been charged with involuntary manslaughter for the death of Tashii Farmer, also known as Tashii Brown. Lopera’s police union does not believe the chokehold Lopera applied was responsible for Farmer’s death, and former UFC heavyweight champion and Brazilian Jiu Jitsu black belt Frank Mir was brought in to review footage and testify as such. The union believes he died of an enlarged heart, drugs in his system and the stress of his struggle with Lopera.

Mir’s testimony is secret, but evidently he saw it in favor of the police officer. Via KTNV.com:

“When he did that one of his first reactions to me was, Steve there is no way this guy killed the suspect involved. There’s no way.” Detective Steve Grammas with the Las Vegas Police Protective Association commented on Mir’s reaction.

The hold Lopera used on Farmer was classified as a low-level use of force at the time, a classification that has since been moved up to an intermediate level due to Farmer’s death. Whether Lopera used the chokehold correctly is in question. Police also say he violated several department policies when he chased, used a stun gun, and applied the chokehold on Farmer. The autopsy report indicated asphyxia as the cause of death, but mentioned other significant conditions.

At the time the Clark County Coroner John Fudenberg stated: “The autopsy determined the cause of death to be asphyxia due to police restraint procedures and other significant conditions included methamphetamine intoxication and cardiomegaly. The manner of death is ruled homicide.”

Each case must be taken individually, but it is worth noting the broader context. Police departments across the country have been increasingly under fire for resorting quickly to forceful methods to subdue people, practices that, in the mind of former CIA operative turned beat cop Patrick Skinner, results in unnecessary escalation of situations. As he explained in this excellent New Yorker piece (which you should absolutely read):

“This is how situations go so, so badly—yet justifiably, legally,” Skinner said. Police officers often encounter people during the worst moments of their lives, and Skinner believes that his role is partly to resolve trouble and partly to prevent people from crossing the line from what he calls “near-crime” into “actual crime.” The goal, he said, is “to slow things down, using the power of human interaction more than the power of the state.”

“You sometimes hear cops talk about people in the community as ‘civilians,’ but that’s bullshit,” he said. “We’re not the military. The people we’re policing are our neighbors. This is not semantics—if you say it enough, it becomes a mind-set.”

Police and MMA typically have a close relationship, with MMA fighters frequently teaching officers the finer points of combat, or even moving from careers in law enforcement to the Octagon (e.g. Forrest Griffin) or vice versa (e.g. Tim Sylvia).


Insomnia

Why are they doing any of this like this? Why is this guy’s deadlift form so off?

McGregor Sports and Entertainment is back in business.

McGregor Sports and Entertainment.

A post shared by Conor McGregor Official (@thenotoriousmma) on

This is just mean of Amanda Cooper. No one, especially not Mackenzie Dern (who has struggled with weight cuts before), should have to deal with cookies outside her door every morning when trying to make weight.

This is both ridiculous and impressive

I barely recognized Jorge Masvidal, as he has clearly put on some weight.

Nothing Vasyl Lomachenko does, surprises me any more.

I doubt things are THAT different from the old days for most fighters, but this quote from Dana White about his athletes being able to sit out and not take any fight offered to them because they can afford to, is very telling.

In ridiculous news of the day, rapper 50 Cent apparently called out Rampage Jackson, so here are some more rapper vs. fighter matchups we might see. I chuckled pretty hard internally.

#ufc #mma #boxing #hiphop #rap

A post shared by Grappling Science (@grappling_science) on

Rampage couldn’t believe it.

Is 50 serious?! ‍♂️

A post shared by Quinton Jackson (@rampage4real) on

Smith is giving free advice to UFC fighters about getting a little extra cash for travel expenses.

Al Iaquinta is hilarious

Olympic gold medalist wrestler Kyle Snyder, who hopefully someday we will see in the cage, had a great quote from Mike Tyson- the happy fighters are the dangerous ones.

Just save this picture, it is evergreen

Why doh ?

A post shared by ORIGINAL MMA CONTENT (@beaversmash) on

Angela Hill expounded on the predictability of haters on social media.

Israel Adesanya, Georges St. Pierre, and Mike Perry need to have a break dancing contest.

This is a great fight between two wrestle-heavy featherweights in Darren Elkins and Alexander Volkanovski

Darren Till had an answer for everyone hating on his sparring videos yesterday- he posts when he takes a knock, after all.

Combat sports this weekend


Good Reads and Quick Hits


Slips, Rips, KO Clips

Nicely done

Khabib Nurmagomedov’s cousin has a mean front kick.

John Lineker has that “F—- you” power


Podcasts and Video

The complete history of the UFC women’s bantamweight title! Follow MMA Mania on Youtube

Great conversation between Leslie Smith and yes, Brendan Schaub of all people.

Stay woke, Maniacs! Follow me on Twitter and Facebook @Vorpality

MMAmania.com – All Posts

Josh Barnett Skirts Suspension in USADA Doping Case, Faces Only Public Reprimand

Despite a convicted past, Josh Barnett won’t be facing a suspension from the U.S. Doping Agency.
Recent News on Sherdog.com

Anderson Silva Reportedly Positive for Synthetic Testosterone, Diuretic in Latest Doping Case

More details have emerged in the latest Anderson Silva doping case.
Recent News on Sherdog.com

Anderson Silva Reportedly Positive for Synthetic Testosterone, Diuretic in Latest Doping Case

More details have emerged in the latest Anderson Silva doping case.
Recent News on Sherdog.com

Anderson Silva Reportedly Positive for Synthetic Testosterone, Diuretic in Latest Doping Case

More details have emerged in the latest Anderson Silva doping case.
Recent News on Sherdog.com