Tag Archive for Belt

Midnight Mania! GSP: Defending One Belt Harder Than Winning Two

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Welcome to Midnight Mania!

Who would have guessed, a few years ago, that we would get so many superfights, we would be wishing for a regular champion who was content to just defend his belt in his own division? Yet, for some fans, that is now the situation the Ultimate Fighting Championship and the trend-setting Conor McGregor have put us in. It’s a welcome problem to have. In the past few years, we have been treated to Conor McGregor vs. Eddie Alvarez, Georges St. Pierre vs. Michael Bisping, Daniel Cormier vs. Stipe Miocic, and currently on the schedule we have TJ Dillashaw vs. Henry Cejudo (with TJ fighting down a weight class, in a bizarre twist) and Cris Cyborg vs. Amanda Nunes. This is in many ways a great change, as these fights have, so far, been a lot of fun, but the danger is that the promotion threatens to further devalue belts already cheapened with interminable interim title bouts. No fighter has yet managed to win and defend two separate belts, meaning that they are, in effect, vacating one division for the next.

Max Holloway is a perfect example. He just defended his featherweight title in one of the greatest performances the 145-lb. division has ever seen, and was immediately inundated with questions about facing Khabib Nurmagomedov, Tony Ferguson, or Conor McGregor, all fights that would take place a division up at lightweight. While a champion taking non-title fights a division up could be fun — who wouldn’t watch Max rematch McGregor, after all — it seems unnecessary when lightweight is so stacked, and featherweight already has more than one rising prospect booked to determine the next top contender.

There was also the question raised, when discussing Max’s potential legacy at featherweight: which counts for more, defending the title many times in a row, as Jose Aldo did, or vaulting up a weight class to claim a second title, like Conor McGregor? Which adds more to the legacy of a fighter?

As one of only five men to hold UFC titles across two weight divisions, as well as one of the longest-running champions in UFC history, Georges St. Pierre is uniquely suited to answer the question: which is a more difficult feat? GSP thinks that defending a belt over a long period of time is more difficult, and he explained why.

I think taking contenders is the hardest thing, and I’m gonna tell you why. Because when you are the champion, you are the target. Everybody is looking at you, everybody is studying your game. So, everything you do, everybody has seen it before. When you are coming as a contender- you’re the contender, you’re challenging the champion- it’s like the guy is looking at you for maybe a few months… which, when you’re champion, people are studying your game every day of your reign. Every guy that come up, their dream is to beat you. So they know your game, sometime better than you know yourself. So, for that reason, its a different perspective.

Is George St. Pierre right? If he is right, should the more difficult feat- defending the title over and over- count for more in terms of a champion’s legacy than winning a second belt in another weight class?


Insomnia

Remember when Conor McGregor’s mindset was that the cage WAS his stage for excellence? It seems unlikely we will ever see a McGregor this focused in the Octagon again, but we can hope.

Jose Aldo is only entertaining to the point that he is being pushed by his opponent. Renato Moicano is young, hungry, aggressive, and skilled in the same phases of the fight Aldo is, to greater or lesser degrees- meaning, this fight is going to rock. The leg kick battle alone is going to be worth your time.

Some context as to the pace Moicano pushes:

Scott Coker’s GIF game is strong

These are some of the fights that had been booked

“We should be friends, probably.” is an all-time great line after the fight Max Holloway and Brian Ortega had

Jon Jones fully looks the part of the killer here

Max Holloway cheers on his Hawaiian sister, Bellator flyweight champion Ilima Lane-MacFarlane

Robert Whittaker is a sellout!

Derrick Lewis on set

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Don’t even feel real #tvshow

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Israel Adesanya is, at heart, an unapologetic nerd.

Jimmie Rivera vs. Aljamain Sterling is another great bantamweight fight

What would you do?


Podcasts and Video

The most relevant fight to watch before Kevin Lee mauls Al Iaquinta this weekend, is undoubtedly their first bout:

Heavy Hands

MMA Ratings


Slips, Rips, KO Clips

What a round

Defense is often more impressive than offense

Thiago Santos vs. Jimi Manuwa was awesome


Random Land

After the slow apocalypse, this will be how we get lions, tigers and genetically engineered sabertooth cats back in North America

Sleep well, Maniacs! A better tomorrow is always possible. Follow me on Twitter and Facebook @Vorpality

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Gegard Mousasi to Defend Middleweight Belt vs. Rafael Lovato Jr. in Bellator 214 Co-Main

Bellator MMA’s Jan. 26 tent-pole event just got a little bit bigger.
Recent News on Sherdog.com

Daniel Cormier: Relationship ‘Tense’ with UFC Because Promotion Wants to Strip LHW Belt

Last week, reports surfaced that the UFC was looking to book a rematch between Jon Jones and Alexander Gustafsson at the promotion’s year-end card.
Recent News on Sherdog.com

Was the UFC Right to Strip Nicco Montano of Her Belt?

The UFC wanted to flesh out a 125-pound division for the ladies, so they put together a season of TUF that would crown a champ, and Nicco Montano ended up winning it. But that was ten months ago, and when it came time for her to defend her belt for the first time – at UFC 228 this past weekend – her weight cut put her in the hospital.

So the UFC stripped her of her title.

The reasons why are obvious. For a litany of health reasons, Montano has been stuck on the sidelines, resulting in a division that has been frozen in suspended animation. Sure, flyweights have fought. But for what? Fighters battling for top contender status are fighting for nothing when the champ is completely out of reach.

The other obvious reason for stripping Montano is the fact that her latest health woe resulted from a failed weight cut. At the end of the day, a champ of a particular division has to be able to make weight in that division. Otherwise, it’s all a charade.

Was the UFC right to take away her belt?

Montano doesn’t think so.

 

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Of course, the argument can be made that the UFC did her a favor. Because if trying to make 125 pounds puts her in the hospital, then Montano shouldn’t be obligated to make that weight anymore. Let her seek her fortunes at bantamweight.

Valentina Shevchenko got screwed out of fighting for, and likely winning, a championship belt on Saturday night. But according to Dana White, Shevchenko is still at the front of the line when a bout to determine the new champion is made. It sucks that Shevchenko, and the entire division, had to weight nearly a year for the logjam to be cleared, but whatevs.

As for Montano… now she has all the time in the world to get better. There’s no pressure, and she doesn’t have to deal with would-be challengers spitting venom at her. I think that’s a definite upside to this whole debacle.

What do you think?

The post Was the UFC Right to Strip Nicco Montano of Her Belt? appeared first on Caged Insider.

Caged Insider

Was the UFC Right to Strip Nicco Montano of Her Belt?

The UFC wanted to flesh out a 125-pound division for the ladies, so they put together a season of TUF that would crown a champ, and Nicco Montano ended up winning it. But that was ten months ago, and when it came time for her to defend her belt for the first time – at UFC 228 this past weekend – her weight cut put her in the hospital.

So the UFC stripped her of her title.

The reasons why are obvious. For a litany of health reasons, Montano has been stuck on the sidelines, resulting in a division that has been frozen in suspended animation. Sure, flyweights have fought. But for what? Fighters battling for top contender status are fighting for nothing when the champ is completely out of reach.

The other obvious reason for stripping Montano is the fact that her latest health woe resulted from a failed weight cut. At the end of the day, a champ of a particular division has to be able to make weight in that division. Otherwise, it’s all a charade.

Was the UFC right to take away her belt?

Montano doesn’t think so.

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by N I C C O R A E (@nrmontano) on


Of course, the argument can be made that the UFC did her a favor. Because if trying to make 125 pounds puts her in the hospital, then Montano shouldn’t be obligated to make that weight anymore. Let her seek her fortunes at bantamweight.

Valentina Shevchenko got screwed out of fighting for, and likely winning, a championship belt on Saturday night. But according to Dana White, Shevchenko is still at the front of the line when a bout to determine the new champion is made. It sucks that Shevchenko, and the entire division, had to weight nearly a year for the logjam to be cleared, but whatevs.

As for Montano… now she has all the time in the world to get better. There’s no pressure, and she doesn’t have to deal with would-be challengers spitting venom at her. I think that’s a definite upside to this whole debacle.

What do you think?

The post Was the UFC Right to Strip Nicco Montano of Her Belt? appeared first on Caged Insider.

Caged Insider

Jessica Andrade Offered to Face Valentina Shevchenko for Flyweight Belt at UFC 228

Jessica Andrade’s one-punch knockout of Karolina Kowalkiewicz at UFC 228 may have earned her another strawweight title shot down the road, but “Bate Estaca” would have been willing to fight for championship gold on Saturday in Dallas.
Recent News on Sherdog.com

Watch Darren Till’s UFC 228 video blog, ‘Un-Till The Belt’

Missing the UFC’s fight week vlog? Why not try ‘Un-Till The Belt’ instead.

Remember UFC fight week blogs? Yeah, those were the days. But while the promotion may have stopped doing them, we’ve seen an uptick of fighters documenting their fight week instead. Darren Till is the latest one to put together a video series, entitled Un-Till The Belt, for his UFC 228 title shot against Tyron Woodley.

Episode one focuses on the month leading up to the fight and showed Till hanging out with other rising UFC stars: Israel Adesanya, Mike Perry, and James Vick.

Episode two follows Till and his team to Las Vegas where they’re working at the UFC Performance Institute to prepare for Tyron Woodley.

For those worried about his weight, there’s even a segment with Darren’s nutritionist. Based on the fridge full of cauliflower we saw, he won’t fail over a tiramisu incident at least.

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Watch Darren Till’s UFC 228 video blog, ‘Un-Till The Belt’

Missing the UFC’s fight week vlog? Why not try ‘Un-Till The Belt’ instead.

Remember UFC fight week blogs? Yeah, those were the days. But while the promotion may have stopped doing them, we’ve seen an uptick of fighters documenting their fight week instead. Darren Till is the latest one to put together a video series, entitled Un-Till The Belt, for his UFC 228 title shot against Tyron Woodley.

Episode one focuses on the month leading up to the fight and showed Till hanging out with other rising UFC stars: Israel Adesanya, Mike Perry, and James Vick.

Episode two follows Till and his team to Las Vegas where they’re working at the UFC Performance Institute to prepare for Tyron Woodley.

For those worried about his weight, there’s even a segment with Darren’s nutritionist. Based on the fridge full of cauliflower we saw, he won’t fail over a tiramisu incident at least.

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Retire? It’s Belt Or Bust For Justin Gaethje Ahead Of UFC Lincoln

Coming off a two fight losing skid, Gaethje wants to show the world – and himself – he’s still championship material.

Justin Gaethje is in a strange place with his career. On one hand, he’s at the height of his fame, with many UFC fans considering him one of the most entertaining fighters in the sport. On the other, his UFC record currently sits at 1-2 with two bad knockout losses in his last two fights. He’s now facing James Vick at UFC Lincoln on August 25th in what many consider a softball match up — relative to facing Eddie Alvarez and Dustin Poirier back to back, anyway.

Gaethje previously said that he’d retire if he got outclassed by Vick. Now in a new interview with MMANYTT he’s clarifying that statement somewhat, saying he’ll retire if he feels he’s no longer UFC champion material.

“100-percent. When that’s not my goal, I will retire,” Gaethje said. “I want to be the best. I want to be the best in the world.”

As far as Gaethje is concerned, those two losses were valuable experience that will make him a better fighter down the road.

”Fighting on a UFC card, there is nothing like it,” he said. “Experience is a hell of a trait to have and now, with some experience under my belt, it will do a lot of things for me.”

And if James Vick wants to dismiss him because of his recent losses, he does so at his own peril.

“If you watch the fights, you have to understand how close either one of us were to getting the ‘W’ and finishing that fight,” Gaethje said. “For James Vick to sit here and say I’m a B-league fighter and I don’t deserve the accolades that I’m getting — the bonuses, the main events — they guy just doesn’t get it. I’m painting a pretty clear picture of what pure effort can achieve in this sport and if you don’t want to pay attention, that’s not my problem.”

Gaethje has talked a lot about the changes he’s making leading into this fight, and it certainly seems like Saturday in Nebraska could be a make or break moment for his career. Will we see a new and improved Gaethje 2.0? Or will he throw caution to the wind as usual once the leather starts flying? I’m not even sure which way I want it to go.

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Lesnar Drops His WWE Belt At Summerslam As UFC Run Looms

Brock Lesnar is no longer a WWE champion, making it all the more likely his next appearance will be in the UFC cage.

Brock Lesnar is no longer the WWE Universal champion.

Lesnar lost the belt to Roman Reigns in the main event of WWE’s big Summerslam event from the Barclays Center in New York City, in what many believe is a precursor to his move from pro wrestling back into the UFC.

Those hoping for a more MMA-centric plotline – an appearance from expected opponent and two division UFC champ Daniel Cormier, perhaps – were disappointed to instead see only Braun Strowman appearing ringside in an attempt to cash in his ‘Money in the Bank’ insta-title shot briefcase. Instead, the only thing he got was an ass whupping from Lesnar, who beat Strowman mercilessly with a chair before tossing the briefcase across the arena.

That was enough of a distraction to allow Reigns to catch Lesnar with a spear, pinning him in what was a surprisingly quick main event for a big Summerslam. But as far as MMA fans are concerned, Lesnar has now lost his belt which seemed like an important requirement before he could return to the UFC.

As mentioned, Lesnar is expected to fight Daniel Cormier sometime in early 2019 once he is no longer under suspension from USADA, the drug testing agency that nailed him for clomiphene back in 2016. But according to Wrestling Observer’s Dave Meltzer, Lesnar hasn’t signed a bout agreement and is only bound to the UFC insofar as he can’t fight MMA for any other promotion.

That leaves the door open for Lesnar once again using the UFC to pry another big contract out of Vince McMahon and the WWE. But Lesnar’s jaunts back and forth from the UFC are big money and big visibility, a win win win for the UFC, Lesnar, and WWE. So unless another strange pro wrestling plot twist occurs, we can all look forward to seeing Lesnar challenge Cormier for the UFC heavyweight belt in early 2019.

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