Tag Archive for 2010

Former Fedor, ‘Minotauro’ Foe Wagner ‘Zuluzinho’ to Fight for First Time Since 2010

Super heavyweight Wagner da Conceicao Martins, better known as Wagner “Zuluzinho,” will return to action for the first time in nearly eight years when he faces “The Ultimate Fighter: Brazil 3” competitor Job Kleber Melo at an Imortal FC event on June 2.
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Bigfoot Silva vs. Andrei Arlovski first fight full video from Strikeforce: ‘Heavy Artillery’ in 2010

Former Ultimate Fighting Championship (UFC) heavyweight champion Andrei Arlovski will try to make one last run for a division title — and avenge a previous loss — all in one fight when he locks horns with Antonio Silva in the UFC Fight Night 51 main event this Sat. night (Sept. 13, 2014) on UFC Fight Pass from inside Nilson Nelson Gymnasium in Brasilia, Brazil. See how their first fight unfolded at Strikeforce: “Heavy Artillery” back in 2010 using the embedded video replay (part one above, part two below). Will history repeat itself in “Bigfoot’s” backyard? Or be re-written by “Pitbull” and his heavy right hand? We’ll find out in less than 48 hours.

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History in the making: UFC shatters records with its 2010 debut in Australia

Adversity causes some men to break; others to break records.

–William Arthur Ward

Ultimate Fighting Championship (UFC) will bring its brand of mixed martial arts (MMA) back to Australia tomorrow night (Dec. 6, 2013) with UFC Fight Night 33, headlined by a heavyweight match-up pitting local hero Mark Hunt against Brazilian import Antonio Silva.

But long before the “Super Samoan” and “Bigfoot” were able to ply their trade inside the Octagon, ZUFFA was testing the international water with a locked-and-loaded pay-per-view (PPV) fight card that would determine if the Outback was indeed a lucrative market.

In the end, it turned out to be the top pound-for-pound market in the world.

Combat sports fans weren’t really sure what to expect when UFC made the announcement that it had booked the Acer Arena in Sydney for its UFC 110 fight card. After all, Feb. 21, 2010 was on a Sunday, to allow UFC 110 to air stateside in its usual PPV slot of Saturday night at 10 p.m. ET.

Then there was the card itself.

Antonio Rodrigo Nogueira led a cast of PRIDE FC all stars in a heavyweight headliner opposite then-contender Cain Velasquez, while Wanderlei Silva and Mirko Filipovic were tasked with turning away Michael Bisping and Anthony Perosh, respectively.

No titles were on the line “down under.”

In fact, UFC was operating with four less championships than it does today. There were no flyweight, bantamweight or featherweight straps, and there certainly wasn’t a women’s 135-pound title. The event took place six months before “Rowdy” Ronda Rousey competed in her first amateur MMA fight under the CFL banner in Oxnard, California.

Three-and-a-half years never felt so long.

Whether or not the promotion rolled the dice, or perhaps just made the best card they could under the circumstances, is unknown. What we do know, is that UFC 110 made history, grossing $ 540,000 in merchandise sales to top its previous record set at UFC 83.

It also set the high water mark for the Acer Arena, previously held by heavy metal band Iron Maiden. All 16,500 tickets for UFC 110 were scooped up on the first day of sales, second only to the promotion’s debut in Montreal back in 2008 as the fastest sellout ever.

The final paid attendance of 17,831 — boosted by the addition of closed circuit television monitors inside the Arena ballroom — was responsible for a $ 2.5 million gate, also second-best of all time for international events.

Then came Velasquez.

He needed just two minutes and 20 seconds to annihilate Nogueira in font of a stunned crowd, a win that would catapult him into a UFC 121 title fight opposite Brock Lesnar later that year. The aforementioned Silva and Filipovic also picked up wins, as did a relatively unknown light heavyweight prospect named James Te Huna.

Like Perosh, the hard-hitting Aussie was making his Octagon debut at UFC 110. Unlike “The Hippo,” Te Huna made the most of it, pounding out veteran slugger Igor Pokrajac in the opening fight of the night. He’s back in front of his countrymen tomorrow evening against Mauricio Rua.

Perosh, meanwhile, battles Ryan Bader, who also made some noise at UFC 110 by knocking out Keith Jardine.

ZUFFA returned to Sydney a year later with UFC 127, headlined by a welterweight battle featuring B.J. Penn vs. Jon Fitch and once again made history, selling out the Acer Arena in just 22 minutes before packing the house with 18,186 fans for a $ 3.5 million gate.

Not too shabby.

What kind of record-breaking numbers UFC can generate for tomorrow night’s fight card on FOX Sports 1, which takes place at the Brisbane Entertainment Centre on Saturday night (Dec. 7) “down under,” remains to be seen.

One thing we do know, is that history is on its side.

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2010: ‘Ferrari World,’ Sheikhs and the WEC comes calling

(As UFC turns 20, we revisit each year from 2013 to 1993 with 20 articles in 20 days)

Since the advent of mustached strongmen, the circus has traveled around on the rails and pitched multicolored tents. Part of the attraction was that the attraction came to you. And part of the UFC’s model is similar — the idea is to travel around to whatever sector of the globe is ready to embrace it. Instead of a tent, they pitch an Octagon. And unless you live in the Falklands or in upstate New York, chances are the UFC will end up in your general area sooner or later.

When the UFC decided to go to Yas Marina in Abu Dhabi in April of 2010, this felt by far like the craziest thing the promotion had attempted. It wasn’t that they sold off a minority portion of the company to Sheikh Tahnoon, or that it was headed to the Middle East, or that the event would be held alfresco under the wheeling constellations just like Tunney-Dempsey back in 1927 at Soldier Field…it was that there wasn’t a freaking venue in place.

It was that they were going to build a temporary arena to house UFC 112, and then tear it down a week later.

Therefore, “Concert Arena” was erected as nothing more than ephemera, just a glamorized squat house for the UFC’s visit. If that weren’t enough, it was built within something called “Ferrari World.” You could practically see the Sheikh using $ 100 bills as kindling for his fireplace while swirling a glass of Henry IV cognac. Laughing. Laughing. (With the flames dancing in his eyes.)

The event in Abu Dhabi was a catalyst for a lot of things. It told everyone that the UFC meant business in taking the Octagon all over the world, not just ports in Europe and Canada. That night on April 10, 2010, the UFC rolled out two title fights like a lush red carpet, and yet neither of them came off even remotely close to what might be considered “reasonable expectation.”

Frankie Edgar fought B.J. Penn in the co-main event, and Anderson Silva — who was originally supposed to fight Vitor Belfort — took on Demian Maia for the middleweight crown. Maia and Edgar were of course the sacrifices. I remember beforehand a very well known MMA journalist telling me, while emboldened by his Guinness, “Edgar might be the first fatality in the cage.” He was of course exaggerating, but the sentiment was there; Edgar didn’t stand a chance.

Turns out Edgar did stand a chance, and in fact fairly dominated the scorecards en-route to taking Penn’s belt. That was the first “say what?” moment in a night full of eye rubbing. The Silva-Maia nightcap was one of the most bizarre main events to ever have pay-per-view customers screaming for rebates. In it Anderson Silva sort of flew off the handle. He mocked and preened and went into theatrics for much of the five rounds he wasn’t even supposed to need in putting Maia away. The performance was so remarkable for all the wrong reasons that Dana White put out a piece of caution on the Jim Rome Show afterwards that said this: He’d cut Anderson Silva if it happened again. Even the greatest living mixed martial artist in the world wouldn’t be suffered such shenanigans.

(This was the context for Silva and his rivalry with Chael Sonnen, who came along at just the right moment right after. Sonnen breathed life back into Silva, just like Silva became a sort of world stage for Sonnen to reinvent himself).

A month earlier, at WEC 47, on March 6 in Columbus, Dominick Cruz defeated Brian Bowles to become the promotion’s bantamweight champion. That night was brimming with the talent of today. Look at the names that appeared on this card before Cruz — Joseph Benavidez, who fought Miguel Torres; Danny Castillo and Anthony Pettis; Scott Jorgensen, who fought Chad George; Chad Mendes and Erik Koch. The card was so stacked that Ricardo Lamas, who fights for the UFC featherweight crown against Jose Aldo at UFC 169, was the first fight on the prelims.

It was just another WEC card.

Zuffa owned the WEC, but at this point had kept the two organizations separate. The WEC had the smaller weight classes. The UFC had everything else. By October of 2010, with the UFC growing and holding more events and needing more star power to carry them, Dana White announced that the promotions would be merging. This was significant for two reasons. One, it meant existing undersized UFC lightweights could fight at 145 pounds without leaving the UFC. And two, it meant people like Cruz, Pettis, Demetrious Johnson, Benson Henderson, Benavidez, Mendes, Lamas and poster boy Urijah Faber would finally showcase their wares for those who avoided eye contact with the WEC’s blue cage.

The WEC would bring over a world of talent to the UFC.

“That was the goal — it was always to find the best fighters,” says Reed Harris, who was the general manager and face of the WEC. “We worked very hard at that. When I came into the office, I never would hear people say, ‘hey the lighting on that show was fantastic.’ Inherently I knew it was all about the fights, and that it’s all about the fighters. So we spent a lot of time looking at them, and went down to Brazil to find Jose Aldo. We did a lot of things that a lot of people didn’t do in trying to find the best people.”

Jose Aldo. The man who made Americans figure out the correct order of the vowels in Nova Uniao.

“The first time I saw Jose, he jumped out of the cage, and I took him in back with his manager Andre Pederneiras — and I’m a guy who rarely raises his voice, because that’s just not who I am — but I was yelling at him,” Harris says. “I read him the Riot Act. Little did I know he didn’t have any idea what I was saying, but he knew I was mad.

“The next show, I was in the cage after he won, and he looked at me, ran towards the door, stopped and then sat down,” Harris says. “He looked up at me and smiled, kind of like a f— you, and ever since then I’ve liked him. Now we’re very close. We spent a lot of time together.”

Harris is now the Vice President of Community Relations with the UFC. Aldo is the long-tenured featherweight champion who is hovering the top three space of most pound-for-pound lists. At UFC 142, after Aldo knocked out Chad Mendes, Aldo disappeared into a sea of his countrymen once again. And once again, Harris was right there tapping his foot with his arms crossed.

“I yelled at him to get back in the cage,” he says. “That’s his place, right? I wasn’t mad at him for doing it. It was crazy. I actually got punched in the crowd. Not on purpose. The guy who punched me looked at me like he was in shock because he was trying to grab Jose. It was just very chaotic, and I yelled at him to get back in for safety reasons.”

That Harris is now scolding Aldo outside of the UFC Octagon instead of outside the WEC blue cage marks the evolution of the times. At some point along the way, Harris knew that the bantamweights and featherweights he’d helped along, not to mention his crop of high-powered lightweights, would all be migrating to the UFC. The thing was inevitable.

“I think at some point it was just decided, look, the UFC is going to be the dominant brand in this sport forever,” he says. “Especially when all of us were watching these lighter-weight fights including Dana and Lorenzo and Frank [Fertitta], and they were seeing that they were entertaining and that people were interested. So why not add to the brand? Why not make the brand even stronger?”

On Feb. 1, 2014, at UFC 169 in Newark during Super Bowl weekend, the WEC’s elite will be on display. Renan Barao and Dominick Cruz will unify the bantamweight belts, and Aldo will defend his title against Ricardo Lamas.

MMA Fighting – All Posts

UFC Undisputed 2010 Reviews

UFC Undisputed 2010 - Sony PSP

  • Fighters and Personalities - Navigate a roster of more than 100 prolific UFC fighters, each fully rendered to convey a photorealistic appearance
  • Enhanced Combat - A new Sway System with full upper body and head movement allows for the dodging of attacks, while on the ground. A new Posture System delivers fight-ending strikes from every position
  • Fighter Customization- Choose from an array of moves from all available disciplines, including newly added Sambo, Karate and Greco-Roman Wrestling, to become a true mixed martial artist.
  • Expansive Online Play - Encourage camaraderie by forming fight camps and leagues to participate in ranking and champion tracking systems. Join forces, train like real-life UFC fighters and go online to compete against other camps in the virtual UFC world.
  • Career Mode - A Game Is Watching You system tracks every action and uses this information to dictate in-game commentary and career progression
So you want to be a fighter? Step into the Octagon in UFC Undisputed 2010 to see if you have what it takes to be the best of the best. UFC Undisputed 2010 features the most authentic MMA action while boasting the best fighters in the world. After one round with all the new features and key improvements, you’ll embody the essence and spirit of a real fighter. Are you ready to be one? UFC Undisputed 2010 is action-packed fighting game for PlayStation Portable that puts the excitement and in

List Price: $ 19.99 Price: $ 18.33

UFC: Best of 2010

Ufc: Best Of 2010

Re-live every great moment, knockout, submission and fight with ''UFC: Best of 2010.'' All the UFC superstars are featured in their most spectacular bouts.

List Price: $ 6.02 Price: $ 3.98

UFC Undisputed 2010

UFC Undisputed 2010 - Xbox 360

  • Fighters and Personalities - Navigate a roster of more than 100 prolific UFC fighters, each fully rendered to convey a photorealistic appearance
  • Enhanced Combat - A new Sway System with full upper body and head movement allows for the dodging of attacks, while on the ground. A new Posture System delivers fight-ending strikes from every position
  • Fighter Customization- Choose from an array of moves from all available disciplines, including newly added Sambo, Karate and Greco-Roman Wrestling, to become a true mixed martial artist.
  • Expansive Online Play - Encourage camaraderie by forming fight camps and leagues to participate in ranking and champion tracking systems. Join forces, train like real-life UFC fighters and go online to compete against other camps in the virtual UFC world.
  • Career Mode - A Game Is Watching You system tracks every action and uses this information to dictate in-game commentary and career progression
So you want to be a fighter? Step into the Octagon in UFC Undisputed 2010 to see if you have what it takes to be the best of the best. UFC Undisputed 2010 features the most authentic MMA action while boasting the best fighters in the world. After one round with all the new features and key improvements, you’ll embody the essence and spirit of a real fighter. Are you ready to be one? UFC Undisputed 2010 is action-packed fighting game that recreates the excitement and intensity of the re

List Price: $ 19.99 Price: $ 27.96