Weidman: Adesanya Is A Bit Overrated

Israel Adesanya and Anderson Silva put on an unexpected dazzling performance during last night’s (Sat., Deb. 9, 2019) UFC 234 main event in Melbourne, Australia (highlights), with both men pulling out some of their best moves, much to the delight of the all the Aussies in attendance.

While former UFC Middleweight champion Chris Weidman was pleased with the show put on by both men, he isn’t all that impressed with Adesanya overall.

It’s a pretty harsh critique from “All American,” as Israel has shown he’s the real deal by reeling of 16 straights wins to remain perfect in his mixed martial arts (MMA) career, including winning all five of his UFC fights rather convincingly.

During the post-fight presser, UFC president Dana White was asked about potentially booking a third fight between Weidman and Silva. And much to the surprise of some, he was all for it.

“Yeah, I would do that fight again if they both wanted it. It’s a fun fight,” stated White. Chris, though, isn’t too interested after going up 2-0 on “The Spider.”

While it’s understandable for Chris not wanting a third fight with Silva, many aren’t quick to give him his just due after “The Spider” suffered a broken leg in the middle of their rematch.

As for Weidman, he hasn’t had the best run as of late, going 1-4 in his last five outings, including suffering a knockout loss to Ronaldo Souza in his previous fight inside the Octagon. The former champion recently underwent neck surgery, so it could be a while before he returns to action.

As for “overrated” Adesanya, he punched his ticket to his first-ever UFC title shot, though it will be a bit before he actually gets to take part in after Robert Whittaker underwent emergency surgery to take care of a hernia that forced him out of his fight against Kelvin Gastelum.

For complete UFC 234 results and coverage click here.

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It Looks Like Conor McGregor vs. Cowboy Cerrone Might Happen… For a Belt!

If Instagram posts are to be believed, then it seems like the match-up between Conor McGregor and Donald “Cowboy” Cerrone might actually happen. And for an interim belt!

Keep in mind that this news tidbit is coming from Cowboy’s social media account, and for all we know, he could be on a Jack Daniels bender and shouting at clouds right now.

But another interim belt in rotation… (Note: This whole interim lightweight belt thing is floating around because champ Khabib Nurmagomedov said he’ll be out until November – which isn’t out of the ordinary, because the dude does observe Ramadan.)

Dual Surgery Corrects Whittaker’s ‘Twisted And Collapsed Bowel’

Around this time last year, Ultimate Fighting Championship (UFC) middleweight champion, Robert Whittaker, was in a “life-threatening” situation when staph infection spread to his stomach and started eating away at his organs.

Fast-forward to 2019 and “The Reaper” is once again dodging death, thanks to a “freak injury” that “could have been fatal.” That’s according to promotion president, Dana White, and now Whittaker’s management team is elaborating on social media.

“Last night at roughly 9pm, Rob began experiencing intense abdominal pains that were brought to the attention of UFC doctors. After several hours of observation he was admitted to the hospital at 3am. Rob is just out of surgery for a twisted and collapsed bowel in addition to an internal hernia of the intestine and will be recovering in the hospital for several days. Rob will want to speak to his fans directly when he can. Rob is devastated that today’s fight will not go ahead. Up until five minutes before going into surgery, Rob was insisting he would fight, but advice was that a blow to his stomach could be fatal. Rob will come back stronger and ready for what is to come. Thanks to the UFC, Kelvin and his team for your professionalism.”

As a result of his withdrawal, the promotion was forced to table Whittaker’s 185-pound title defense, previously scheduled to headline the UFC 234 pay-per-view (PPV) event last Sat. night (Feb. 9, 2019) inside Rob Laver Arena in Melbourne, Australia.

Promotion president, Dana White, was non-committal when asked about the creation of an interim title, instead waiting to see what Whittaker’s recovery timeline might be once the Aussie is discharged from the hospital later this week.

Taking over the main event slot was the middleweight showdown pitting former division champion, Anderson Silva, opposite 185-pound striking sensation, Israel Adesanya. “The Spider” put up a good fight, but ultimately fell to “The Last Stylebender” after three rounds of action (highlights here).

Adesanya was expected to compete for the middleweight title later this year, but those plans may be on hold until White and Co. can rebook Whittaker vs. Gastelum.

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Live! UFC 234 Results & Play-By-Play!

Ultimate Fighting Championship (UFC) is ready to unleash its UFC 234 pay-per-view (PPV) fight card TONIGHT (Sat., Feb. 9, 2019) inside Rod Laver Arena in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. A middleweight title fight between current champion Robert Whittaker and top contender Kelvin Gastelum was expected to serve as UFC 234’s main event, but Whittaker was removed from the card with just hours left due to a hernia.

As a result, former UFC middleweight king Anderson Silva will now square off with undefeated former kickboxer Israel Adesanya in the headliner. The bout was originally coined as the co-main event and will remain a three-round affair.

MMAmania.com will deliver LIVE round-by-round, blow-by-blow coverage of the entire UFC 234 fight card below, starting with the Fight Pass “Prelims” matches online, which are scheduled to begin at 7 p.m. ET, then the remaining undercard balance on ESPN at 8 p.m. ET, before the PPV main card start time at 10 p.m. ET.

Keep in mind that we will also be the spot for the latest news, recaps, and post-fight analysis following “Silva vs. Adesanya.”

Without further delay, see below for the latest UFC 234 results. (Note: This will go from the bottom up; therefore, scroll toward the bottom for the latest detailed round-by-round action.)

UFC 234 QUICK RESULTS:

Robert Whittaker vs. Kelvin Gastelum DETAILS!
Israel Adesanya vs. Anderson Silva
Marcos Rosa Mariano vs. Lando Vannata
Rani Yahya vs. Ricky Simon
Montana De La Rosa vs. Nadia Kassem
Jim Crute vs. Sam Alvey
Dong Hyun Ma vs. Devonte Smith — Smith def. Ma by KO (punches) at 3:53 of Round One
Austin Arnett vs. Shane Young — Young def. Arnett by unanimous decision (30-27 x3)
Kai Kara-France vs. Raulian Paiva — Kara-France def. Paiva by split decision (28-29, 29-28 x2)
Teruto Ishihara vs. Kyung Ho Kang — Kang def. Ishihara by technical submission (rear naked choke) at 3:59 of Round One
Callan Potter vs. Jalin Turner — Turner def. Potter by KO (punches) at 0:53 of Round One
Wuliji Buren vs. Jonathan Martinez — Martinez def. Buren by unanimous decision (30-27 x2, 29-28)

UFC 234 PLAY-BY-PLAY:

185 lbs.: Israel Adesanya vs. Anderson Silva

Round 1:

Round 2:

Round 3:

Final result:


155 lbs.: Marcos Rosa Mariano vs. Lando Vannata

Round 1:

Round 2:

Round 3:

Final result:


135 lbs.: Rani Yahya vs. Ricky Simon

Round 1:

Round 2:

Round 3:

Final result:


125 lbs.: Montana De La Rosa vs. Nadia Kassem

Round 1:

Round 2:

Round 3:

Final result:


205 lbs.: Jim Crute vs. Sam Alvey

Round 1:

Round 2:

Round 3:

Final result:


155 lbs.: Dong Hyun Ma vs. Devonte Smith

Round 1: Patient start to the fight. Low kick from Smith. Another. Ma switching stance a minute in. Left hook by Smith. Head kick attempt. Body shot connects. Two minutes in. Low kick exchange. Jab connects for Smith. Low kick again and again Ma switches stance. Head kick attempt from Smith. Two minutes to go.

Smith checks a low kick and hurts Ma with a 1-2, stalking him and pouring on the hurt until the ref steps in.

Final result: Smith def. Ma by KO (punches)


145 lbs.: Austin Arnett vs. Shane Young

Round 1: Young on the front foot early. Inside low kick and jabs. 1-2 connects. Arnett fires a head kick, eats a right cross near the fence. One minute in. Combination from Young, jab from Arnett. Young lands another right hand, then one to the body. Arnett connects with a straight left. Good exchanges so far. Hard straight left by ARnett. Young digs another right downstairs, follows up with one to the head. Two minutes in. Young ties up on the fence, separates. Arnett lands some jabs. Young throwing 2-3s, Arnett still keeping up with him. Two minutes to go.

More good jabs from Arnett. Young to the body. Arnett picking him off on the way in. Young with a combination, eats left hands. Body kick from Arnett. One minute to go. Young with a right downstairs. Young finds the mark with a heavy combo near the end of the round, including a knee. He looks for a single-leg. 10-9 Young.

Round 2: Young continues to pressure. Arnett shifting stance, jabbing well. Body kick from Young. More jabs from Arnett, who eats a straight right. Young body kick, Arnett head kick attempt. One minute in. Low kicks and a body shot from Young. Arnett landing jabs, but not following up. Young still forcing him back. Straight left by Arnett. Low kick exchange. Two minutes to go. More lefts from Arnett. Both land low kicks. Counter right by Arnett lands clean. Leg kick. Young snaps his head back with a straight right. Hard body kick and a right hand behind it for Young. Two minutes to go.

Arnett lands a series of jabs and tries a head kick. Young marching after him, throwing in combination. 1-2 from Arnett, right hand from Young. Young steps in with a jab and a straight right to the ear. Another pair of rights. Heavy combination. Arnett taking the well but continues to retreat. Young shoots, takes his head out of a guillotine. Arnett with a nice left on the break and now he’s swinging big. Young obliges with some nice shots. Big counter right by Young as they slug it out. 10-9 Young.

Round 3: Young continues to advance. A series of jabs lands for Arnett. Arnett catches a body kick and lands a hard right hand. One minute in. Young with a jab downstairs, right hand up top. Right hand and kick to the body. Two minutes in. Counter left connects for Arnett. Young looks fr the body, lands a right upstairs. Another rush from Young lands. Arnett just not doing enough off the back foot. Two minutes to go.

Young finding the mark with right hands, Arnett with his jab. Head kick from Arnett glances off. One minute to go. Young with a nice uppercut inside, then a nasty combination. Right cross by Arnett. 2-3 connects. A three-piece combo and now it’s Arnett landing. Young moves in to meet him and both land massive punches, Young scoring a last-second knockdown with a cracking right hand. 10-9 Young.

Final result: Young def. Arnett by unanimous decision


125 lbs.: Kai Kara-France vs. Raulian Paiva

Round 1: Both men tossing out kicks to start. Overhand right briefly drops Paiva, who pops right back up. One minute in. Low kick from Paiva, overhand from Kara-France and he limp-legs out of a single-leg. One minute in. Paiva popping his jab out. He flurries and shoots against the fence. Kara-France defends two minutes in. Both men jabbing. Overhand fright from Paiva, left hook from Kara-France. Paiva lands a leg kick. Two minutes to go.

Paiva avoids a 1-2-3, eats a straight right. Leg kick connects for him. He threatens a spinning back kick, lands a right but can’t complete the takedown. One minute to go. Paiva tries a flurry. 1-2. Head kick attempt. 10-9 Kara-France.

Round 2: Paiva the busier of the two. Kara-France shoots, stuffed and winds up on his back. Side control for Paiva. Kara-France scrambles to his feet and they trade on the break. Another shot from Kara-France, denied. Paiva landing knees in the clinch. Kara-France with a left hand on the break. Counter right by the Brazilian. Two minutes in. Paiva lands another leg kick. Flurry and another low kick. He easily stuffs another takedown and lands some hard body shots while standing over his man. Kara-France lands an upkick. He rolls to his feet. Two minutes to go.

Body kick lands for Paiva. 1-2 cracks Paiva and now they’re trading. Both land hard left hooks. Paiva with some good right hands, walking Kara-France down. He steps in with a knee. One minute to go. Leg kick connects. Kara-France steps in, gets teh worst of the exchange. Now he steps in with a right hand. Triple jab. Kara-France lands a good right and jumps guard on a guillotine at the bell. 10-9 Paiva.

Round 3: Kara-France lands a leg kick. Paiva with a nice combination low-high. Kara-France left hook, Paiva right hand. One minute in. 1-2 from Kara-France. Paiva eats a 1-2. He catches a leg kick, then boots the living daylights out of Kara-France’s cup. They resume with two minutes to go. Paiva continues to walk him down, landing combos. Nasty body shots and he looks for a guillotine. Kara-France drags him to the mat in response to a guillotine attempt. Paiva scrambles back to his feet, eats shots in the center with two minutes to go.

Paiva threatens to spin. He lands a body shot, takes an overhand right. One minute to go. Trading in the center. It’s still Paiva walking him down. Big left hooks by Kara-France. Paiva rips the body. Hard left from the Brazilian. Kara-France shoots in the waning seconds and completes it. 10-9 Paiva.

Final result: Kara-France def. Paiva by split decision


135 lbs.: Teruto Ishihara vs. Kyung Ho Kang

Round 1: Ishihara opens with low kicks. Body kick from Kang. Another and a straight right behind it. Ishihara comes back with a leg kick and check hook. Good overhand left and a monster counter drops Kang. Kang shoots, denied. He lands a right hand and knee, then another right hand that stings Ishihara. Lead right connects. Two minutes in. Kang goes downstairs, then drops Ishihara with a knee. Another right hand and another. Uppercuts in the clinch. Ishihara slugging it out with him. Kang getting the better of it, lands some blistering knees. Now he changes levels and completes a single-leg. He tries to take the back with no hooks. Two minutes to go.

Now both hooks in and he’s got the choke locked up. Ishihara goes to sleep.

Final result: Kang def. Ishihara by technical submission (rear naked choke)


155 lbs.: Callan Potter vs. Jalin Turner

Round 1: Potter opens with a leg kick. Right hand into a takedown attempt. Turner gets an underhook and shoves him to the mat, posturing out of an omoplata and limp-legging out of a leglock. Back to the feet. Two right hands sting Potter and Turner pummels him into unconsciousness.

Final result: Turner def. Potter by KO (punches)


135 lbs.: Wuliji Buren vs. Jonathan Martinez

Round 1: Martinez opening with inside low kicks. Both men firing head kicks. Buren changes levels against the fence and lands an inside trip into guard. One minute in. Buren looking for half guard, setting up a guillotine. Martinez scrambles into his own takedown attempt as Buren looks to cinch it up and dumps him to the mat. Two minutes in. Martinez moves to side control and looks for a Von Flue choke. Not there. Buren turns to his knees and is in danger of having his back taken. Two minutes to go.

One hook in for Martinez. Buren moving, can’t quite dislodge him. Martinez whacks him with a hard left as he stands and loses the hook in the process. Pressing Buren against the fence with a minute to go. Martinez exits with a knee, then slips on a high kick. Buren stands over him and looks to drop punches, gets tied up in guard. Martinez spins for an armbar, then a leg. 10-9 Martinez.

Round 2: Buren hops in with a knee and body kick after taking some low kicks. Two-piece counter from Martinez. Left cross connects. One minute in. Shift right hand by Buren, oblique kick from Martinez. Martinez with a body kick and left cross behind it. 1-2 and front kick attempt. Buren hits a reactive shot, avoiding a guillotine as he does. Half guard. Martinez trying to regain guard, instead sweeps his way into top position. Buren using butterfly guard. He hits a sweep of his own to regain half guard. Two minutes to go.

Martinez forces a scramble, nearly gives up his back, can’t wrench Buren down but forces him to a knee. Good knee to the body from Martinez. One minute to go. Elbow connects. Martinez threatening a choke. He ends the round landing knees to the thigh. 10-9 Martinez.

Round 3: Buren hits an early trip directly into mount. Martinez uses the cage to roll free, only for Buren to latch onto an arm. Martinez escapes, takes the back, and starts dropping punches a minute in. Maintaining back control. Two minutes in. Martinez transitions to mount, then the back again. Mount, left hands, back. Good punches. Two minutes to go.

Martinez appears to consider an arm triangle, which allows Buren to sweep into guard. Martinez kicks him off, can’t make enough space. Buren clamps onto an anaconda choke, can’t complete it and shoots in. One minute to go. Martinez sprawls on it and forces him to his back. Buren with two butterfly hooks in. Martinez opens up with ground-and-pound, nearly getting a finish before the bell. 10-9 Martinez.

Final result: Martinez def. Buren by unanimous decision


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It Looks Like Conor McGregor vs. Cowboy Cerrone Might Happen… For a Belt!

If Instagram posts are to be believed, then it seems like the match-up between Conor McGregor and Donald “Cowboy” Cerrone might actually happen. And for an interim belt!

Keep in mind that this news tidbit is coming from Cowboy’s social media account, and for all we know, he could be on a Jack Daniels bender and shouting at clouds right now.

But another interim belt in rotation… (Note: This whole interim lightweight belt thing is floating around because champ Khabib Nurmagomedov said he’ll be out until November – which isn’t out of the ordinary, because the dude does observe Ramadan.)

How To Watch UFC 234 ‘Prelims!’

The action unfolds later tonight (Sat., Feb. 9, 2019) at UFC 234 live on pay-per-view (PPV) from inside Rod Laver Arena in Melbourne, Australia, as middleweight champion Robert Whittaker officially defends his title for the first time against dangerous contender Kelvin Gastelum.

Before Whittaker vs. Gastelum leads a PPV card that also features a co-main event clash between former middleweight king Anderson Silva and undefeated sensation Israel Adesanya, a slew of preliminary bouts will unfold on Fight Pass and ESPN.

The UFC 234 “Prelims” stack up as follows:

ESPN “Prelims”

Devonte Smith vs. Dong Hyun Ma
Shane Young vs. Austin Arnett
Kai Kara-France vs. Raulian Paiva
Teruto Ishihara vs. Kyung Ho Kang

Fight Pass Early “Prelims”

Lando Vannata vs. Marcos Rosa Mariano
Callan Potter vs. Jalin Turner
Wuliji Buren vs. Jonathan Martinez

Check out below to find out when and where you can catch the action.

How to watch UFC 234 Fight Pass “Prelims” (Start time: 6:30 p.m. ET)

ONLINE:

CABLE/SATELLITE:

  • Brazil — Combate
  • Mexico — UFC Network
  • Argentina — UFC Network
  • Bolivia — UFC Network
  • Chile — UFC Network
  • Colombia — UFC Network
  • Ecuador — UFC Network
  • Panama — UFC Network
  • Paraguay — UFC Network
  • Peru — UFC Network
  • Dominican Republic — UFC Network
  • Venezuela — UFC Network

How to watch UFC 234 ESPN “Prelims” (Start time: 8:00 p.m. ET)

CABLE/SATELLITE:

  • UFC 234: Whittaker vs. Gastelum “Prelims” can be viewed via ESPN. Check your local providers or click here for instant access to ESPN.
  • Canadian viewers can watch UFC 234 “Prelims” via TSN Network.

If you find yourself mobile tonight and unable to view UFC 234 from the comfort of your own home, feel free to find a participating bar near you!

MMAmania.com will deliver LIVE round-by-round, blow-by-blow coverage of the entire UFC 234 fight card, starting with the Fight Pass “Prelims” matches online, which are scheduled to begin at 6:30 p.m. ET, then the remaining undercard balance on ESPN at 8 p.m. ET, before the PPV main card start time at 10 p.m. ET.

To see who else is fighting at UFC 234 click here.

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Remember When the Middleweight Division Was Compelling?

This weekend’s edition of Octagon goodness takes place in Australia, so of course the UFC has their resident champ from Down Under on the card: Robert Whittaker. Which is fine – Whittaker is tough, he’s skilled, and he more than earned the belt. But his presence as a headliner, opposite TUF winner Kelvin Gastelum, is sort of a glaring reminder that the middleweight division… well… it used to be a lot more compelling.

Back in the day, we had Anderson Silva as champ, and he was straight-up ganking people.

Then we had Chris Weidman, Luke Rockhold and Michael Bisping making each other’s lives miserable. Which was good entertainment! But sadly, that whole thread ran out when Georges St. Pierre emerged from retirement to wreck Bisping, before slinking back into the shadows again.

Don’t get me wrong. Whittaker is a decent champ. When not dealing with injuries, he’s active, and he wins.

But his wins are rarely awe-inspiring. In two go-arounds with Yoel Romero, Whittaker took two decisions – and the last one was a close split decision. That does not an exciting division make.

So yeah, UFC 234. Gastelum. Who didn’t get past Weidman, but did at least knock out an old Bisping and decision Jacare. Ho-humm.

When can we have excitement, again?

The post Remember When the Middleweight Division Was Compelling? appeared first on Caged Insider.

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Midnight Mania! Cerrone Says He’s Fighting McGregor For Interim Lightweight Title

Bringing you the weird and wild from the world of MMA each and every weeknight

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According to Donald “Cowboy” Cerrone, he is fighting Conor McGregor for the interim lightweight title. Via his Instagram:

Good News @thenotoriousmma looks like we get to fight for 155 Interim Title vs @properwhiskey vs @budweiser

It seems likely, considering comments made by Dana White after the UFC 234 press conference, in which he said that both men have ‘earned’ this opportunity. Via BloodyElbow.com:

“Those two want to fight each other, they’ve both earned it,” White told MMAjunkie following the UFC 234 pre-fight press conference in Australia. “‘Cowboy’s’ fought anybody we’ve ever put against him. We throw this young killer Hernandez at him, ‘Cowboy’s’ the underdog and he goes in and does it the way he did it, then Conor’s fought everybody.

“If these two want to fight, I’m down.”

According to Dana’s comments, he also thinks Tony Ferguson is next for current lightweight Khabib Nurmagomedov, which makes the timeline interesting. If Cerrone fights McGregor this summer, the UFC will presumably want Khabib to fight Ferguson around the same time, but Khabib wants to wait until November. The man left out in the cold in that scenario, of course, is Dustin Poirier, who has been holding out hope for a title shot of his own.

Not everyone is going to end up happy in any scenario, particularly with the weight of McGregor’s drawing power warping the gravity around any hope of rational decisions involving the UFC lightweight title. Cerrone vs. McGregor is an easy sell, and that might be what ends up counting.


Insomnia

Joe Rogan is evidently a really popular tattoo for some reason

Dominick Cruz too?? Who is getting these tattoos?

I really wish I hadn’t seen this, this looks like an alien is trying to climb out the back of Gastelum’s neck.

This is a less gross version of the meme

Max Holloway is hilarious

In related news, Jose Aldo’s coach also wants that Alex Volkanovski fight.

“Bobby Knuckles” is hated by Dana, which is a great reason to keep calling Robert Whittaker that.

Nate Quarry having too much fun


Slips, Rips, KO Clips

Ouch!

I can almost feel her pain

Dance like a butterfly, hit like a hammer

People are calling for Anderson to turn this around on Israel Adesanya


Random Land

I love this account, which is all abandoned places.

Sleep well, Maniacs! A better tomorrow is always possible. Follow me on Twitter and Facebook @Vorpality

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Remember When the Middleweight Division Was Compelling?

This weekend’s edition of Octagon goodness takes place in Australia, so of course the UFC has their resident champ from Down Under on the card: Robert Whittaker. Which is fine – Whittaker is tough, he’s skilled, and he more than earned the belt. But his presence as a headliner, opposite TUF winner Kelvin Gastelum, is sort of a glaring reminder that the middleweight division… well… it used to be a lot more compelling.

Back in the day, we had Anderson Silva as champ, and he was straight-up ganking people.

Then we had Chris Weidman, Luke Rockhold and Michael Bisping making each other’s lives miserable. Which was good entertainment! But sadly, that whole thread ran out when Georges St. Pierre emerged from retirement to wreck Bisping, before slinking back into the shadows again.

Don’t get me wrong. Whittaker is a decent champ. When not dealing with injuries, he’s active, and he wins.

But his wins are rarely awe-inspiring. In two go-arounds with Yoel Romero, Whittaker took two decisions – and the last one was a close split decision. That does not an exciting division make.

So yeah, UFC 234. Gastelum. Who didn’t get past Weidman, but did at least knock out an old Bisping and decision Jacare. Ho-humm.

When can we have excitement, again?

The post Remember When the Middleweight Division Was Compelling? appeared first on Caged Insider.

Caged Insider

Covington Standing Ground Even If It Means ‘Never Fighting Again’

Colby Covington keeps digging himself a deeper hole with Ultimate Fighting Championship (UFC) after not getting the welterweight title shot he wanted.

Less than one week after UFC president Dana White confirmed that “Chaos” is no loner the interim welterweight champion, having defeated Rafael dos Anjos at UFC 225 to claim the title, Covington has made it clear that he’s no longer going to play nice with the massive MMA promotion.

“I’m just moving on with my life,” Covington told TSN. “I’m not going to be the nice guy anymore. I’m not going to be the guy that tells lies about the UFC and tries to cover for the UFC like they’re so great and everything’s fine and dandy.

“I’ve done so many favors for the UFC, flown all over the world, fought for little money against top contenders, fought for entry-level money. I’ve never complained, always been a company man, never failed a steroid test. Never done anything wrong, literally never.”

This situation has gotten so out of hand that Covington, who is just 30 years of age and has compiled a professional MMA record of 14-1 (9-1 UFC), is threatening to walk away from the sport. That is unless he gets the title shot he was promised.

“I’m the biggest draw in this division right now,” Covington proclaimed. “I’m not fighting for anything less than I deserve and I don’t care what they say. I’ll stand up for what’s right and if that means never fighting again then that means never fighting again.

“I’ve already built a great life for myself. I came from the projects. I came from trailer parks, growing up with one parent, just my mom, having to work four jobs. I don’t need anything anymore. I’ve already made enough money where I’m healthy and I have investments and I have enough going on in my life that I don’t need to fight ever again. You may never see me fight again. That’s a possibility right now.”

I guess UFC better pony up that “undisputed champion” money.

Despite these rants, it’s highly unlikely that UFC will budge and feed into Covington’s antics. At the end of the day, the promotion waits for no fighter. Just ask current UFC welterweight champion Tyron Woodley, who has already warned his nemesis of his wrong doings.

At this point, Covington may be better off laying low and keeping his name out of the headlines. The more he pokes the bear that is UFC the less likely he is to get his way.

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