Archive for Caged Insider

UFC on ESPN+2 Primer: The Jose Aldo Train Is Coming to the End of the Line

It sort of goes without saying that Jose Aldo is a legend.

He was the first dominant “little guy” when the UFC got into the “little guy” business, and his run as featherweight champ saw a lot of carnage befall his enemies. A lot of carnage.

Of course, that all came to an end the night Conor McGregor starched him in seconds. And then there was now-champ Max Holloway, who beat the stuffing out of Aldo not once but twice.

Which brings us to today. Aldo has long flirted with the idea of retiring, and now that he’s gotten older and less capable of hanging with the youngsters, maybe that exit date has grown closer. He fighting against Renato Moicano at UFC on ESPN+2 this weekend in Brazil, in the co-main event slot, and you have to think that whenever a Brazilian fighter is close to calling it quits, he asks matchmaker Sean Shelby to make that last fight close to home, so…

…So I guess savor his fight this weekend? I mean, maybe he wins and fights again, or maybe he doesn’t and doesn’t.

Anyway, here’s Daniel Cormier giving the match-up some hype.

The post UFC on ESPN+2 Primer: The Jose Aldo Train Is Coming to the End of the Line appeared first on Caged Insider.

Caged Insider

UFC on ESPN+2 Primer: The Jose Aldo Train Is Coming to the End of the Line

It sort of goes without saying that Jose Aldo is a legend.

He was the first dominant “little guy” when the UFC got into the “little guy” business, and his run as featherweight champ saw a lot of carnage befall his enemies. A lot of carnage.

Of course, that all came to an end the night Conor McGregor starched him in seconds. And then there was now-champ Max Holloway, who beat the stuffing out of Aldo not once but twice.

Which brings us to today. Aldo has long flirted with the idea of retiring, and now that he’s gotten older and less capable of hanging with the youngsters, maybe that exit date has grown closer. He fighting against Renato Moicano at UFC on ESPN+2 this weekend in Brazil, in the co-main event slot, and you have to think that whenever a Brazilian fighter is close to calling it quits, he asks matchmaker Sean Shelby to make that last fight close to home, so…

…So I guess savor his fight this weekend? I mean, maybe he wins and fights again, or maybe he doesn’t and doesn’t.

Anyway, here’s Daniel Cormier giving the match-up some hype.

The post UFC on ESPN+2 Primer: The Jose Aldo Train Is Coming to the End of the Line appeared first on Caged Insider.

Caged Insider

UFC on ESPN+2 Primer: The Jose Aldo Train Is Coming to the End of the Line

It sort of goes without saying that Jose Aldo is a legend.

He was the first dominant “little guy” when the UFC got into the “little guy” business, and his run as featherweight champ saw a lot of carnage befall his enemies. A lot of carnage.

Of course, that all came to an end the night Conor McGregor starched him in seconds. And then there was now-champ Max Holloway, who beat the stuffing out of Aldo not once but twice.

Which brings us to today. Aldo has long flirted with the idea of retiring, and now that he’s gotten older and less capable of hanging with the youngsters, maybe that exit date has grown closer. He fighting against Renato Moicano at UFC on ESPN+2 this weekend in Brazil, in the co-main event slot, and you have to think that whenever a Brazilian fighter is close to calling it quits, he asks matchmaker Sean Shelby to make that last fight close to home, so…

…So I guess savor his fight this weekend? I mean, maybe he wins and fights again, or maybe he doesn’t and doesn’t.

Anyway, here’s Daniel Cormier giving the match-up some hype.

The post UFC on ESPN+2 Primer: The Jose Aldo Train Is Coming to the End of the Line appeared first on Caged Insider.

Caged Insider

UFC on ESPN+2 Primer: The Jose Aldo Train Is Coming to the End of the Line

It sort of goes without saying that Jose Aldo is a legend.

He was the first dominant “little guy” when the UFC got into the “little guy” business, and his run as featherweight champ saw a lot of carnage befall his enemies. A lot of carnage.

Of course, that all came to an end the night Conor McGregor starched him in seconds. And then there was now-champ Max Holloway, who beat the stuffing out of Aldo not once but twice.

Which brings us to today. Aldo has long flirted with the idea of retiring, and now that he’s gotten older and less capable of hanging with the youngsters, maybe that exit date has grown closer. He fighting against Renato Moicano at UFC on ESPN+2 this weekend in Brazil, in the co-main event slot, and you have to think that whenever a Brazilian fighter is close to calling it quits, he asks matchmaker Sean Shelby to make that last fight close to home, so…

…So I guess savor his fight this weekend? I mean, maybe he wins and fights again, or maybe he doesn’t and doesn’t.

Anyway, here’s Daniel Cormier giving the match-up some hype.

The post UFC on ESPN+2 Primer: The Jose Aldo Train Is Coming to the End of the Line appeared first on Caged Insider.

Caged Insider

Nevada Commission Licenses Jon Jones Because They Like Money

As if there were any doubt… the Nevada State Athletic Commission took up the issue of Jon Jones today, and they decided to grant him a license to compete at UFC 235.

If you’ll recall, the UFC had to move UFC 232 from Nevada to California because, well, Jones had steroids in his system (supposedly) left over from the last time he did them. And since it there wasn’t enough time to get the appropriate suitcases full of cash into the hands of appointed officials waiting in casino parking lots, the UFC did what they had to do to have Jones stay on the card.

So anyway, Jones was granted his license to face Anthony Smith. He’ll have to take all sorts of extra drug tests, and pay for them himself. He’ll also be restricted to a list of certain steroids – for instance, nothing whose name ends in “-ol” (like stanozolol).

Here’s MMAFighting:

The reigning UFC light heavyweight champion was granted a one-fight license to compete on March 2 against Anthony Smith in the main event of UFC 235 at a Tuesday afternoon hearing of the Nevada Athletic Commission (NAC). In a lengthy meeting that spanned over three hours, NAC officials determined that Jones will be required to be drug tested a minimum of twice a month until UFC 235, then continue to comply with a similarly rigorous testing schedule throughout all of 2019 if he wishes to fight in Nevada again.

Jones will be required to pay for the additional drug tests in the lead-up to UFC 235.

“This is on you,” NAC chairman Anthony Marnell told Jones. “It’s on your shoulders. I like what I hear, I like what I see, but the proof’s in the pudding. So I’m happy that you’re back here, you’ll always be treated with respect here, and I wanted to make sure that you understood that today. Welcome back to Nevada, and do the right thing from this point going forward. As you know, we’re going to be visiting you frequently.”

What.

Ever.

The post Nevada Commission Licenses Jon Jones Because They Like Money appeared first on Caged Insider.

Caged Insider

Nevada Commission Licenses Jon Jones Because They Like Money

As if there were any doubt… the Nevada State Athletic Commission took up the issue of Jon Jones today, and they decided to grant him a license to compete at UFC 235.

If you’ll recall, the UFC had to move UFC 232 from Nevada to California because, well, Jones had steroids in his system (supposedly) left over from the last time he did them. And since it there wasn’t enough time to get the appropriate suitcases full of cash into the hands of appointed officials waiting in casino parking lots, the UFC did what they had to do to have Jones stay on the card.

So anyway, Jones was granted his license to face Anthony Smith. He’ll have to take all sorts of extra drug tests, and pay for them himself. He’ll also be restricted to a list of certain steroids – for instance, nothing whose name ends in “-ol” (like stanozolol).

Here’s MMAFighting:

The reigning UFC light heavyweight champion was granted a one-fight license to compete on March 2 against Anthony Smith in the main event of UFC 235 at a Tuesday afternoon hearing of the Nevada Athletic Commission (NAC). In a lengthy meeting that spanned over three hours, NAC officials determined that Jones will be required to be drug tested a minimum of twice a month until UFC 235, then continue to comply with a similarly rigorous testing schedule throughout all of 2019 if he wishes to fight in Nevada again.

Jones will be required to pay for the additional drug tests in the lead-up to UFC 235.

“This is on you,” NAC chairman Anthony Marnell told Jones. “It’s on your shoulders. I like what I hear, I like what I see, but the proof’s in the pudding. So I’m happy that you’re back here, you’ll always be treated with respect here, and I wanted to make sure that you understood that today. Welcome back to Nevada, and do the right thing from this point going forward. As you know, we’re going to be visiting you frequently.”

What.

Ever.

The post Nevada Commission Licenses Jon Jones Because They Like Money appeared first on Caged Insider.

Caged Insider

Nevada Commission Licenses Jon Jones Because They Like Money

As if there were any doubt… the Nevada State Athletic Commission took up the issue of Jon Jones today, and they decided to grant him a license to compete at UFC 235.

If you’ll recall, the UFC had to move UFC 232 from Nevada to California because, well, Jones had steroids in his system (supposedly) left over from the last time he did them. And since it there wasn’t enough time to get the appropriate suitcases full of cash into the hands of appointed officials waiting in casino parking lots, the UFC did what they had to do to have Jones stay on the card.

So anyway, Jones was granted his license to face Anthony Smith. He’ll have to take all sorts of extra drug tests, and pay for them himself. He’ll also be restricted to a list of certain steroids – for instance, nothing whose name ends in “-ol” (like stanozolol).

Here’s MMAFighting:

The reigning UFC light heavyweight champion was granted a one-fight license to compete on March 2 against Anthony Smith in the main event of UFC 235 at a Tuesday afternoon hearing of the Nevada Athletic Commission (NAC). In a lengthy meeting that spanned over three hours, NAC officials determined that Jones will be required to be drug tested a minimum of twice a month until UFC 235, then continue to comply with a similarly rigorous testing schedule throughout all of 2019 if he wishes to fight in Nevada again.

Jones will be required to pay for the additional drug tests in the lead-up to UFC 235.

“This is on you,” NAC chairman Anthony Marnell told Jones. “It’s on your shoulders. I like what I hear, I like what I see, but the proof’s in the pudding. So I’m happy that you’re back here, you’ll always be treated with respect here, and I wanted to make sure that you understood that today. Welcome back to Nevada, and do the right thing from this point going forward. As you know, we’re going to be visiting you frequently.”

What.

Ever.

The post Nevada Commission Licenses Jon Jones Because They Like Money appeared first on Caged Insider.

Caged Insider

Nevada Commission Licenses Jon Jones Because They Like Money

As if there were any doubt… the Nevada State Athletic Commission took up the issue of Jon Jones today, and they decided to grant him a license to compete at UFC 235.

If you’ll recall, the UFC had to move UFC 232 from Nevada to California because, well, Jones had steroids in his system (supposedly) left over from the last time he did them. And since it there wasn’t enough time to get the appropriate suitcases full of cash into the hands of appointed officials waiting in casino parking lots, the UFC did what they had to do to have Jones stay on the card.

So anyway, Jones was granted his license to face Anthony Smith. He’ll have to take all sorts of extra drug tests, and pay for them himself. He’ll also be restricted to a list of certain steroids – for instance, nothing whose name ends in “-ol” (like stanozolol).

Here’s MMAFighting:

The reigning UFC light heavyweight champion was granted a one-fight license to compete on March 2 against Anthony Smith in the main event of UFC 235 at a Tuesday afternoon hearing of the Nevada Athletic Commission (NAC). In a lengthy meeting that spanned over three hours, NAC officials determined that Jones will be required to be drug tested a minimum of twice a month until UFC 235, then continue to comply with a similarly rigorous testing schedule throughout all of 2019 if he wishes to fight in Nevada again.

Jones will be required to pay for the additional drug tests in the lead-up to UFC 235.

“This is on you,” NAC chairman Anthony Marnell told Jones. “It’s on your shoulders. I like what I hear, I like what I see, but the proof’s in the pudding. So I’m happy that you’re back here, you’ll always be treated with respect here, and I wanted to make sure that you understood that today. Welcome back to Nevada, and do the right thing from this point going forward. As you know, we’re going to be visiting you frequently.”

What.

Ever.

The post Nevada Commission Licenses Jon Jones Because They Like Money appeared first on Caged Insider.

Caged Insider

Nevada Commission Licenses Jon Jones Because They Like Money

As if there were any doubt… the Nevada State Athletic Commission took up the issue of Jon Jones today, and they decided to grant him a license to compete at UFC 235.

If you’ll recall, the UFC had to move UFC 232 from Nevada to California because, well, Jones had steroids in his system (supposedly) left over from the last time he did them. And since it there wasn’t enough time to get the appropriate suitcases full of cash into the hands of appointed officials waiting in casino parking lots, the UFC did what they had to do to have Jones stay on the card.

So anyway, Jones was granted his license to face Anthony Smith. He’ll have to take all sorts of extra drug tests, and pay for them himself. He’ll also be restricted to a list of certain steroids – for instance, nothing whose name ends in “-ol” (like stanozolol).

Here’s MMAFighting:

The reigning UFC light heavyweight champion was granted a one-fight license to compete on March 2 against Anthony Smith in the main event of UFC 235 at a Tuesday afternoon hearing of the Nevada Athletic Commission (NAC). In a lengthy meeting that spanned over three hours, NAC officials determined that Jones will be required to be drug tested a minimum of twice a month until UFC 235, then continue to comply with a similarly rigorous testing schedule throughout all of 2019 if he wishes to fight in Nevada again.

Jones will be required to pay for the additional drug tests in the lead-up to UFC 235.

“This is on you,” NAC chairman Anthony Marnell told Jones. “It’s on your shoulders. I like what I hear, I like what I see, but the proof’s in the pudding. So I’m happy that you’re back here, you’ll always be treated with respect here, and I wanted to make sure that you understood that today. Welcome back to Nevada, and do the right thing from this point going forward. As you know, we’re going to be visiting you frequently.”

What.

Ever.

The post Nevada Commission Licenses Jon Jones Because They Like Money appeared first on Caged Insider.

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Bellator 214 Results: Fedor Emelianenko Annihilated by Ryan Bader in 35 Seconds

The headline says it all. At Bellator 214 last night, in the Bellator heavyweight grand prix final, Ryan Bader needed only 35 seconds to TKO Fedor Emelianenko. I mean, is this really a surprise to anyone?

Fedor is long past his days of glory, when he was considered the best heavyweight in the world, bar none. And Bader, besides being a TUF winner and UFC vet, is Bellator light-heavyweight champ, so… yeah, this was going to happen.

It still hurts, of course. It hurts anytime we have to see our heroes fight long past their prime, and it especially stings because it’s Fedor. Fedor was the man! Now, he’s a prime candidate for whatever CTE clinics they have going in Russia.

Ugh.

The post Bellator 214 Results: Fedor Emelianenko Annihilated by Ryan Bader in 35 Seconds appeared first on Caged Insider.

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